Jun 23, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Automotive Technology

  
  • ATE 207 - Advanced Engine Performance


    Credits: 4
    6 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 245 

     
    Description
    This course covers the terminology, theory and operation of the computerized on-board diagnostic (OBD) system found on current vehicles. Students will apply their knowledge of ignitions, fuels, emissions and engines to diagnose vehicle drivability-related problems. Student will use specific test equipment and procedures to isolate vehicle problems and utilize the chassis dynamometer to complete OBD II monitors and diagnose vehicle faults. The use of hybrid technology to enhance engine performance and economy will be covered. Some course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use diagnostic equipment to diagnose drivability-related faults.
    2. Use a five gas emission analyzer as a diagnostic tool.
    3. Develop, interpret and document the diagnostic process used to repair drivability-related faults.
    4. Remove and replace failed fuel, emission and ignition components.
    5. Perform specific OBD II fault diagnosis.
    6. Use the dynomometer to complete OBD II monitors.
    7. Explain how hybrid vehicles increase vehicle efficiency.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety in the shop
    2. Engine performance diagnostic procedures
    3. Engine performance diagnostic equipment
    4. OBD II
    5. Five gas emission analyzer
    6. Data stream analysis
    7. OBD II monitors
    8. Hybrid vehicle operation
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


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  • ATE 230 - Engine Performance 1


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 122  and ATE 131  

     
    Description
    This course provides a study of the conventional, electronic and distributor-less/coil over-plug ignition systems. Students will become acquainted with automotive ignition systems and troubleshoot and/or diagnose ignition problems. An introduction to chassis dynamometer operation and safety will be covered. Emphasis is placed on troubleshooting and the proper use of electronic test equipment. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify ignition-related components.
    2. Explain various ignition systems.
    3. Diagnose ignition-related concerns in a lab setting.
    4. Define on-board diagnostics (OBD) II terminology.
    5. List the steps required to safely restrain a vehicle on the dynamometer.
    6. Explain how a dynamometer can be used in diagnosis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. Manufacturer-specific diagnostic service information
    3. Ignition-related components
    4. Primary ignition system
    5. Secondary ignition system
    6. Timing controls
    7. Ignition system diagnosis in lab setting
    8. OBD II
    9. Dynamometer safety
    10. Diagnosis using a dynamomter
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


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  • ATE 234 - Stndrd Transmission/Transaxle/Drivetrain


    Credits: 3
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course will introduce the student to the design, assembly, operation and diagnostic procedures for clutches, manual transmissions and transaxles, differential components and drive axle components. Drive train vibration analysis and noise correction will also be covered. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Remove and inspect a clutch assembly and identify the components.
    2. Interpret computer-based service information and apply information to the disassembly and reassembly of a manual transmission or transaxle.
    3. Remove, inspect, setup and reassemble a differential assembly.
    4. Disassemble, inspect and reassemble an all wheel drive transfer case.
    5. Analyze driveline noise and vibrations then apply corrective measures to eliminate.
    6. Practice on-car diagnostic procedures relating to clutch, drive train and all wheel drive systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Clutch theory, operation and diagnosis
    2. Manual transmission/transaxle, theory, operation and diagnosis
    3. Differential theory, operation and diagnosis
    4. Utilization of special service tools, factory procedures and service Information
    5. Noise, vibration and harshness
    6. Transfer case theory, operation and diagnosis
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


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  • ATE 235 - Auto Transmissions and Transaxles


    Credits: 5
    8 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course will introduce the student to the theory and practical application of the automatic transmission and transaxle. Transmissions and transaxles are studied with emphasis on diagnosis and repair of hydraulic systems, mechanical systems and electronic control systems. On-car diagnostic procedures will be practiced in conjunction with industry-recognized service manual information. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Disassemble, inspect and reassemble automatic transmission and transaxle assemblies.
    2. Interpret service manual information and use precision measuring tools to determine component condition and reusability.
    3. Identify and discuss individual internal components of automatic transmission.
    4. Practice logical on-car diagnostic procedures relating to the automatic transmissio’s computer control and hydraulic system.
    5. Use diagnostic scan tools and other manufacturer specific testing equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theory, disassembly and reassembly of various automatic transmissions and transaxles
    2. Performance of hydraulic and electrical transmission system tests
    3. Scan tools and digital multi-meters to analyze vehicles with no concerns
    4. Scan tools and digital multi-meters to analyze vehicles with instructor created concerns
    5. Comparison of scan tool results of the normal vehicle to the defective vehicle
    6. Manufacturer-specific disassembly, measuring and reassembly tools
    7. Hybrid and conventional torque converter application relating to fuel efficiency
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


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  • ATE 245 - Engine Performance 2


    Credits: 4
    6 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 230  

     
    Description
    This course covers, in detail, the theory, operation and diagnosis of computerized fuel injection and emission control systems. The student will verify the operation of fuel and emission control systems utilizing diagnostic test equipment to include a chassis dynamometer. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify inputs used by the engine computer to calculate fuel delivery.
    2. Prioritize engine computer inputs as they relate to engine operation.
    3. Explain how fuel adaptive functions of engine computers can be used as diagnostic tools.
    4. Use a scan tool to analyze engine computer inputs and retrieve diagnostic fault codes.
    5. Test and verify operations of fuel delivery systems.
    6. Identify emission control systems and components and explain what emissions they are designed to control.
    7. Identify engine computer outputs and associate them to correct corresponding inputs.
    8. Define on-board diagnostics (OBD) II terminology.
    9. Explain how a dynamometer can be used in diagnosis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Shop safety
    2. Gasoline
    3. Fuel pumps
    4. Tanks/lines/filters
    5. Fuel injection
    6. Diagnosis
    7. Exhaust gas recirculation
    8. Positive crankcase ventilation
    9. Secondary air
    10. Evaporative emission system
    11. Catalytic converters
    12. Exhaust gas analysis
    13. OBD II
    14. Dynamometer diagnosis
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


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  • ATE 250 - Automotive Internship 1


    Credits: 1
    400 Cooperative Ed Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 101  and Department Recommendation

     
    Description
    This internship adds a professional opportunity for “hands on” experience with all the skills and knowledge gained in the Automotive Program courses. Employment with a commercial auto or truck repair business with a minimum of 400 verifiable working hours is required to complete this course. The work hours logged must be in ASE categories A1 through A8.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Complete a co-operative working experience of 400 hours.
    2. Participate in various aspects of the workplace in order to gain experience and insight into how automotive service centers operate.
    3. Meet employer expectations by cooperating with fellow employees as measured by a written evaluation form which shall include:
    •  Quality of work,
    •  Personal habits,  
    •  Attitude,
    •  Judgment,
    •  Initiative,
    •  Productivity

        4.  Participate in the diagnosis and repair of vehicles with guidance from the service shop supervisor.

     Listed Topics

    1. The student will have the opportunity to diagnose and repair vehicle concerns with guidance from the service shop supervisor or the employer.
    Reference Materials
    Service information will vary with shop.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/01/2005


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  • ATE 251 - Automotive Internship 2


    Credits: 1
    400 Cooperative Ed Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 250  and Department Recommendation.

     
    Description
    This internship is a continuation of Automotive Internship 1 (ATE 250 ) to further provide students a professional opportunity for “hands on” experience with all the skills and knowledge gained in the Automotive Program courses. Employment with a commercial auto or truck repair business with a minimum of 400 verifiable working hours is required to complete this course. The work hours must be logged in ASE categories A1 through A8.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Complete a co-operative work experience of 400 hours.
    2. Continue to participate in various aspects of the workplace in order to gain experience and insight into how automotive service centers operate.
    3. Continue to meet employer expectations by cooperating with fellow employees as measured by a written evaluation form which shall include:
    • Quality of work,
    • Personal habits,
    • Attitude,
    • Judgment,
    • Initiative,
    • Productivity

        4.  Participate in the diagnosis and repair of vehicles with guidance from the service shop supervisor.

     Listed Topics

    1. The student will continue to have the opportunity to diagnose and repair vehicle concerns with guidance from the service shop supervisor or the employer.
    Reference Materials
    Service information will vary with shop.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/01/2005


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  • ATE 252 - Explorations in Transportation Innovation, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    Modern transportation systems increasingly involve computerized mechanisms for control, analysis, and design. Drawing on the tools and methods of automotive technology, mechatronics, and data analytics, students explore transportation related problems through hands-on, project-based learning in each discipline. Students will draw on problem-solving frameworks used by each discipline to generate innovative ideas for presentation to industry partners. As a survey course, students from all academic disciplines at any stage of degree progression will acquire transferrable skills relevant to their own domain.
    Learning Outcomes
    Cross-cutting objectives

    1. Navigate the interconnectedness of technology related to transportation
    2. Collaborate on an interdisciplinary team to pursue a shared line of inquiry related to a transportation concern
    3. Analyze the ethical and environmental dimensions associated with technical transportation systems 

    Data analytics

    1. Identify and describe the sources and structure of data in the transportation domain (spatial data, longitudinal data, sensor output data, crash reporting data, crowd-sourced data)
    2. Generate data-driven inquiry questions that inform a broader line of inquiry related to a transportation concern (e.g. vehicle energy efficiency, road grid design, safety system analysis)
    3. Gather data from primary or secondary sources connected to the chosen pathway of inquiry
    4. Transform and map raw data into structures and formats appropriate for analysis
    5. Present data-backed conclusions to an audience and include a discussion of the limits of appropriate application of the findings

    Automotive technology

    1. Hands-on repair and installation of electronic sensors (e.g. accelerometers, fuel consumption, etc.)

    Mechatronics

    1. Use of programmable logic controllers to automate responses to sensor data
    Listed Topics
    • Transportation system analysis
    • Problem diagnosis and solution planning
    • Data analytics and optimization
    • Sensing and device communication
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved materials will be used.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    • Information Literacy
    • Technological Competence


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  • ATE 401 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 1
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Learning Outcomes
    1. Complete a co-operative working experience of 400 hours. Participate in the diagnosis and repair of vehicles with guidance from the service shop supervisor.

    Approved By: Dice, Frances Date Approved: 08/24/2011


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  • ATE 402 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 2
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll
    in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Jacobs, Diane Date Approved: 04/16/2015


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Aviation (Flight) Technology

  
  • AVT 101 - Private Pilot Theory


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: AVT 103  

    Description
    This course is a study of the principles of flight, specifically covering all data to obtain a Private pilot Certificate as regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA-Part 141). On completion of AVT101, AVT 103 , and AVT 105 , the student should be able to pass the FAA written examination for private pilot certification.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the function of basic airplane systems.
    2. Successfully apply the aerodynamic principles of flight.
    3. Demonstrate effective communication practices in the flight environment.
    4. Interpret meteorological conditions using FAA weather data.
    5. Demonstrate VFR navigation/basic instrument navigation and performance factors using the principles of cross country flying.
    6. Investigate human factor issues in aviation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Discovering aviation
    2. Airplane systems
    3. Aerodynamic principles
    4. Flight environment
    5. Communications and flight information
    6. Meteorology for pilots
    7. Federal Aviation Regulations
    8. FAR / AIM Part 1,61,67,91
    9. Interpreting weather data
    10. Airplane performance
    11. Navigation
    12. Human factors
    13. Principles of flying cross country
    Reference Materials
    Jeppesen Private Pilot Manual, FAA Private Pilot
    Knowledge Test Guide, Private Pilot Practical test Standards, FAR / AIM.
     
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


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  • AVT 103 - Air Traffic Control Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: AVT 101  

    Description
    In this course, the student studies the development, growth and usage of the air traffic control system with emphasis on its use in the United States. This course introduces common aviation terminology and expands upon basic Private Pilot aeronautical knowledge. In addition, proper cross-country planning procedures are illustrated.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe routine aeronautical processes.
    2. Identify airport signage.
    3. Discuss basic navigational equipment.
    4. Illustrate proper cross-country planning procedures.
    5. Describe Air Traffic Control procedures and services.
    6. Define common aviation terms.
    Listed Topics
    1. Airport signage
    2. Visual Flight Rules (VFR)
    3. Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)
    4. National Airspace System charts (NAS)
    5. Air Traffic Control system
    6. Navigational charts
    7. Radio and air traffic control communications
    8. Controlled and uncontrolled airport procedures
    9. Military Intercept Procedures (MIP)
    10. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations and Airman’s Information Manual  (FAR/AIM), other current textbooks, internet resources and miscellaneous handouts.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • AVT 105 - Flight-Private


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: AVT 101  

    Description
    This course provides the student with flight instruction and experience at a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Part 141 approved flight school. The student will complete the dual and solo flight time requirements including pre- and post-flight briefing and required stage exams. A valid second class medical certificate is required to begin this course. The student must pass the FAA private pilot practical exam to obtain a private pilot certificate in order to successfully complete the course. The FAA required minimum flight hours in this course are 35 hours; however, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform all maneuvers outlined in the Practical Test Standards (PTS).
    2. Apply proper communication procedures at both controlled and uncontrolled airports.
    3. Obtain standard weather briefings.
    4. Demonstrate proper understanding of Visual Flight Rules (VFR).
    5. Perform solo flights both locally and cross-county.
    6. Pass the FAA private pilot practical exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pre- and post-flight preparation
    2. Airport operations
    3. Takeoffs, landings and go-arounds
    4. Performance maneuvers
    5. Ground reference maneuvers
    6. Navigation
    7. Slow flight and stalls
    8. Basic instrument maneuvers
    9. Emergency procedures
    10. Night operations
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), Cessna/King multi-media program, current textbook and the Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • AVT 110 - Aviation Meteorology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of weather, meteorological charts and reports for safe aircraft flight. Topics include the effects of air pressure, temperature, moisture, fronts, thunderstorms, hazardous weather conditions and related meteorological phenomena. Students use all available weather forecasting and reporting data to promote safe flight.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the meteorological principles of pressure, temperature, wind and moisture, including their effects on aircraft operation.
    2. Discuss the use of proper altimetry.
    3. Analyze the effects of air masses, fronts and cloud classifications.
    4. Apply Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules and regulations for operation in turbulence, icing, thunderstorms and instrument meteorological conditions.
    5. Apply weather principles to the interpretation and use of aviation weather resources to promote safe flight.
    6. Analyze weather conditions that cause hazardous flight environments.
    Listed Topics
    1. High pressure and low pressure areas
    2. Surface temperatures and temperatures aloft
    3. Basic aerodynamics
    4. Surface winds or winds aloft
    5. Altimetry and airplane performance
    6. Moisture content in the air
    7. Cloud classification
    8. Air masses
    9. Fronts
    10. Turbulence
    11. Wind shear
    12. Icing
    13. Thunderstorms
    14. Ceilings and visibility
    15. Safety of flight
    16. Weather forecasting
    Reference Materials
    Textbook required, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • AVT 111 - Flight Theory/Instrument


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 101  AVT 103  AVT 105  

     
    Description
    This course covers the aeronautical knowledge needed to sit for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Part 141 Instrument Pilot Knowledge exam. Successful completion of this course will authorize the student to sit for the exam.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss principles of attitude instrument flight.
    2. Review appropriate instrument flight planning and decision-making.
    3. Demonstrate proper understanding of instrument flight rules.
    4. Demonstrate proper understanding of visual flight rules.
    5. Describe proper instrument approach procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principles of instrument flight
    2. Pre- and post-flight procedures
    3. Instrument flight environments
    4. Instrument approaches
    5. Instrument flight rules (IFR) operational considerations
    6. Meteorology
    7. Flight planning
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), instrument flight information charts, current textbook and the internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • AVT 115 - Flight/Instrument


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 101  AVT 103  AVT 105  
    Co-requisites: AVT 111  

    Description
    This course provides the student with the required flight training to obtain the instrument rating. The course includes necessary flight training as well as the requisite stage exams while preparing a student for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) instrument pilot practical exam. All training follows FAA Part 141 regulations. A second class medical certificate is required to take this course. The student must pass the FAA instrument pilot practical exam to obtain an instrument rating in order to successfully complete the course. The FAA required minimum flight hours in this course are 35 hours; however, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform all FAA maneuvers outlined in the Practical Testing Standards (PTS).
    2. Apply proper communication at controlled and uncontrolled airports.
    3. Obtain instrument standard weather briefings.
    4. Demonstrate instrument flight rules and proper planning procedures.
    5. Complete the necessary cross-country instrument flights.
    6. Pass the FAA instrument pilot practical exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pre- and post-flight procedures
    2. Air Traffic Control clearances and procedures
    3. Flight of the aircraft by reference to the instruments
    4. Navigation aids
    5. Instrument approach procedures
    6. Emergency operations
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), instrument flight information charts, National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) and the Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/05/2014


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  • AVT 116 - Navigation


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of air navigation beginning with a review of pilotage and dead reckoning, and continuing through the use of available radio guidance systems, flight directors, on-board radar, Global Positioning Systems (GPS),  Radio Navigation (RNAV), Lateral Navigation (LNAV) and Flight Management Computer (FMS). Plotters, navigation computers, sectional and en route charts and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) publications and manuals are studied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate pilotage and dead-reckoning, utilizing Visual Flight Rules (VFR) flight planning procedures.
    2. Determine proper electronic navigation principles and procedures.
    3. Investigate ground based radar navigation and instrument approaches procedures.
    4. Analyze principles of area navigation, RNAV, GPS and long range over water navigation systems.
    5. Demonstrate operation of electronic flight, navigation and flight management systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pilotage and dead-reckoning
    2. VFR flight planning
    3. Electronic navigation
    4. Ground based radar navigation
    5. Instrument approaches
    6. Principles of area navigation
    7. RNAV
    8. GPS
    9. Long range over water navigation
    10. Inertial navigation
    11. Electronic flight information systems
    12. Navigation and flight management systems
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations/Airman Information Manual (FAR/AIM), Chart supplements, current navigation textbook.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • AVT 117 - Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of unmanned aircraft systems (under 55 pounds) and their role in the field of aviation. Students will learn current commercial regulations, the national airspace system, weather, loading and performance and operations in accordance with the FAA Airmen Certification Standards (ACS). At the completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the FAA aeronautical test to become certified as remote small aircraft systems pilots.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify current UAS commercial registration, certification and regulation procedures.
    2. Define common aviation terminology and definitions.
    3. Describe the effects of weight and balance on UAS performance.
    4. Recall the components of UAS systems, instruments and payloads.
    5. Summarize the basic principles of flight procedures.
    6. Apply the basic principles of navigation, aeronautical chart interpretation and radio communications.
    7. Conduct basic flight manuevers using a computerized flight simulator and UAS system.
    8. Evaluate the classifications of the national airspace system.
    9. Design flight plans for an unmanned aircraft system.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of drones
    2. Registration and certification basics
    3. UAS regulations
    4. National Airspace System
    5. Weather
    6. Loading and performance
    7. Crew resource management
    8. Operations
    9. Radio communications
    10. Emergency procedures
    11. Flight planning and management
    12. FAA aeronautical test
    13. Flight simulator training
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, internet, software and appropriate media.


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  • AVT 201 - Aircraft Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 101  

     
    Description
    In this course, students study the components and operation of aircraft systems, including hydraulic, electrical, fuel, oil, pressurization, flight controls, anti-icing, fire and the interrelationship of directional guidance. Performance charts, weight and balance calculations and sections of aircraft operating manuals are addressed. Also studied are engine systems, ranging from basic piston engines to sophisticated jet propulsion, as well as auxiliary power units.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the physics of aircraft engines and reciprocating jet engine theory.
    2. Demonstrate the operational considerations of simple and  complex aircraft systems, propellers and governors, fuel systems, turbo-charging, super-charging and landing gear systems.
    3. Examine pneumatic, de-ice and rain systems.
    4. Investigate aircraft structures and flight control systems.
    5. Demonstrate the concepts and practical application of aircraft weight and balance.
    6. Explore aircraft inspections and pilot maintenance.
    7. Analyze performance charts and weight and balance calculations.
    8. Review aircraft operating manual(s) with an emphasis on limitations, non-normal and emergency sections.

     Listed Topics

    1. Physics of aircraft engines and auxiliary power units
    2. Reciprocating engine theory
    3. Engine lubrication and cooling
    4. Propellers and governors
    5. Fuel systems
    6. Power management systems
    7. Turbo-charging and super-charging
    8. Pressurization systems for high altitude operations
    9. Electrical systems
    10. Hydraulics, landing gear systems and braking systems
    11. Pneumatic and de-icing systems
    12. Fire systems
    13. Aircraft structures and flight controls
    14. Weight and balance
    15. Inspections and pilot maintenance
    16. Aircraft instrumentation
    17. Perfomance charts
    18. Normal, non-normal and emergency checklists
    19. Aircraft operating manual(s)
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations/Airman’s Information Manual, Current systems textbook, airplane operating manuals and handouts.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • AVT 205 - Flight-Commercial 1


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 111  AVT 115  
    Co-requisites: AVT 211  

    Description
    This course will develop the commercial pilot skills necessary for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) commercial pilot practical exam. The course provides instruction and flight experience including pre- and post-flight briefings as well as the dual and solo flights necessary to complete the approved hours for the commercial pilot exam. A second class medical certificate is required to take this course. The FAA required minimum flight hours in this course are 60 hours; however, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate commercial pilot maneuvers.
    2. Perform a night cross-country flight.
    3. Complete cross-country flights using visual flight rules.
    4. Define the operations and limitations of a commercial pilot.
    5. Pass the FAA Part 141 commercial pilot stage check.
    Listed Topics
    1. Operations of a commercial pilot
    2. Limitations of a commercial pilot
    3. Aerodynamics and principles of flight
    4. Cross-country flight
    5. Commercial maneuvers
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), Aeronautical Informational Manual (AIM), instrument flight information charts, National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) and the Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • AVT 211 - Flight Theory/Commercial


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 111  AVT 115  
    Co-requisites: AVT 205  

    Description
    This course will provide the aeronautical knowledge necessary to receive authorization to sit for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Part 141 commercial pilot knowledge exam. The course provides instruction and flight experience and includes complex aircraft operations, understanding of commercial regulations and multi-engine principles of flight.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe commercial regulations.
    2. Define complex aircraft systems and operation.
    3. Describe multi-engine aircraft systems operations.
    4. Define the limitations of a commercial pilot.
    5. Pass the FAA Part 141 commercial pilot knowledge exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Commercial pilot operations
    2. Complex aircraft operations
    3. High altitude operations
    4. Performance calculations of weight and balance for landing and takeoff
    5. Commercial maneuvers
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), instrument flight information charts, National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) current textbook and the internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • AVT 215 - Flight/Commercial 2


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 205  and AVT 211  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of the commercial flight course. It includes the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) required hours of instruction in a complex aircraft and flight experience including pre and post flight briefings as well as dual and solo flights. A second class medical certificate is required to take this course. For successful completion of the course, the student must successfully pass the FAA Part 141 commercial pilot practical exam. The FAA required minimum flight hours in this course are 60 hours; however, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Execute minimum and maximum performance maneuvers.
    2. Demonstrate complex aircraft operations.
    3. Define the operations and limitations of a commercial pilot.
    4. Pass the FAA Part 141 commercial pilot practical exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Commercial pilot operations
    2. Complex aircraft operations
    3. Maximum performance maneuvers
    4. Stall/spin awareness
    5. Commercial maneuvers
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations (FAA), Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), instrument flight information charts, National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) and the Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • AVT 216 - Flight Safety


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 201 , ENG 101  
    Co-requisites: AVT 211  

    Description
    Students are instructed in safe flight from proper pre-flight planning through end-of-trip debriefing.  Requirements for accident/incident reports are addressed, as well as cockpit resource management. Physical, emotional and psychological effects on flight are also addressed. Sources include the Federal Aviation Regulation/Airman’s Information Manual (FAR/AIM) and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident reports.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze case studies on aviation accident causation, including preventative measures.
    2. Define organizational and cultural behaviors and their effect on aviation safety.
    3. Determine corrective actions for pilot training in aircraft accident prevention.
    4. Review the human body’s physical, emotional and psychological effects on flight.
    5. Analyze the internal and external stressors that affect flight.
    6. Demonstrate crew resource management techniques.
    7. Develop a sample organizational aircraft safety program.
    8. Examine air carrier safety programs.

     Listed Topics

    1. Aircraft accidents involving but not limited to weather hazards, midair collisions, Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) and pilot proficiency
    2. Physical, psychological and emotional stressors, as related to flight and the effects of flight on the human body
    3. Effects of adverse weather and mechanical abnormalties on flight 
    4. Internal and external stressors and how they adversely affect flight
    5. Crew Resource Management (CRM)
    6. Advanced decision making techniques
    7. General aviation safety operations
    8. Air carrier safety operations
    Reference Materials
     Federal Aviation Regulations/Airman’s information Manual, current flight safety textbook, advisory circulars, airworthiness directives and National Transportation and Safety Board investigation reports.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • AVT 217 - Legal Environment of Aviation


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 101 , ENG 101  

     
    Description
    Students study the laws affecting the aviation industry, including administrative agencies, liability, negligence, aircraft accident reporting and airline and other commercial operations. Non-commercial operations are also reviewed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss the American legal system as applied to the federal aviation system.
    2. Analyze aircraft ownership in the United States.
    3. Analyze the construction and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification regarding experimental aircraft.
    4. Articulate an overview of the aviation insurance industry and its impact on aircraft ownership and flight training.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of FAA enforcement procedures of Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) as they pertain to aircraft operations.
    6. Analyze the principles of negligence liability, product liability and negligence law.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of the FAA medical certificate issuance and the appeals process.
    Listed Topics
    1. The American legal system
    2. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
    3. Aircraft ownership 
    4. Homebuilt aircraft Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Pittsburgh Chapter
    5. Aviation insurance
    6. FAA enforcement procedures 
    7. Principles of negligence liability 
    8. Particular applications of negligence law
    9. Product liability
    10. Medical certificate appeals and special issuance
    Reference Materials
    Federal Aviation Regulations/Airman’s Information Manual (FAR/AIM), current textbook, handouts
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • AVT 220 - Multi-Engine Theory


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 103  AVT 105  

     
    Description
    In this course students will acquire the aeronautical knowledge needed to meet the requirements specified in the FAA Regulations-Part 141 for the multi-engine pilot written examination.


    Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of multi-engine component/systems through FAA approved stage exams.
    2. Demonstrate through oral and practical exams the use of system integration and checklist usage.
    3. Apply practical use of crew/cockpit resource management techniques.
    4. Analyze and diagram multi-engine aircraft maneuvers.
    5. Examine emergency procedures and their practical application.

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • AVT 225 - Multi-Engine Flight


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 105  
    Co-requisites: AVT 220  

    Description
    This course is an FAA 141 approved fixed base operator will give multi-engine flight training in modern twin-engine aircraft. The course is designed to give a pilot a minimum of 10 hours of flight instruction, including 10 hours of oral instruction and briefing. The student must successfully complete the FAA Multi-engine Pilot Rating Flight Exam. The FAA required minimum flight hours in this course are 10 hours; however, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Pass the FAA Multi-engine practical exam resulting in the issuance of an FAA multi-engine rating.
    2. Demonstrate the application of proper preflight procedures.
    3. Apply the use of checklists for both normal and non-normal procedures.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to execute to FAA practical test standards multi-engine maneuvers.
    5. Demonstrate proper cockpit resource management in the operation of multi-engine aircraft.
    Listed Topics
    1. Preflight and multi-engine aircraft performance calculation
    2. Checklist and system integration
    3. Normal operations
    4. FAA multi-engine certification maneuvers
    5. Non-normal (emergency) procedures
    6. Cockpit / crew resource management
    Reference Materials
    Jeppesen Multi-Engine Kit, FAR/AIM
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • AVT 255 - Cert Flght Instr Airplane Flgt


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 215  
    Co-requisites: AVT 250  

    Description
    This course prepares the commercial pilot to meet the FAA 141 flight requirements for the CFI-A certification. the estimated minimum flight hours required in this course are 15 hours, which will cover practice teaching, flight theory and flight maneuvers. However, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Pass the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Airplane Practical exam.
    2. Demonstrate the the theories of learning/teaching and effective communication.
    3. Develop a lesson plan and syllabus.
    4. Demonstrate the use of the students’ portfolio to illustrate FAA flight theory and certification maneuvers lesson plans and handouts.
    5. Demonstrate classroom and in-flight teaching techniques.
    6. Analyze knowledge of evaluation techniques.
    7. Demonstrate the correlation and application of FAA regulations.
    8. Demonstrate the proper use of FAA documentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Teaching theory
    2. Effective communication
    3. Lesson plan development
    4. Syllabus development
    5. Flight theory and certification maneuvers
    6. Ground school techniques
    7. In-flight instruction techniques
    8. Evaluation theory and techniques
    9. FAA documentation and regulations
    Reference Materials
    Jeppesen Certified Flight Instructor kit, FAR/AIM Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Instrument Flying Handbook, Fundamentals of Instructing Handbook, Certified Flight Instrument Instructor Written exam study guides, FAA Instrument Pilot Practical Test Standards.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


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  • AVT 265 - Cert Flight Instrct/Instrm Airpln Flight


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: AVT 255  AVT 250  
    Co-requisites: AVT 260  

    Description
    This course prepares the commercial pilot to meet the FAA 141 flight requirements for the CFI-A certification. The estimated minimum flight hours required in this course are 10 hours, which will cover practice teaching, flight theory and analysis of flight maneuvers. However, the actual flight hours may vary based on student proficiency.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Pass the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Instrument Airplane Practical Exam.
    2. Demonstrate the theories of learning/teaching and effective communication.
    3. Apply the principles of lesson plan and syllabus development.
    4. Demonstrate the use of the students’ portfolio of FAA instrument flight theory and certification maneuvers, lesson plans and handouts.
    5. Demonstrate classroom and in-flight teaching techniques.
    6. Analyze knowledge of evaluation techniques.
    7. Demonstrate the application of FAA Instrument regulations.
    8. Demonstrate the proper use of FAA documentation.
       
    Listed Topics
    1. Teaching theory
    2. Effective communication
    3. Lesson plan development
    4. Syllabus development
    5. Instrument flight theory and certification maneuvers
    6. Ground school techniques
    7. In-flight instruction techniques
    8. Evaluation theory and techniques
    9. FAA documentation and IFR regulations
    10. FAA documentation and regulations
    Reference Materials
    Jeppesen Certified Flight Instructor kit, FAR/AIM Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Airplane Flying Handbook, Fundamentals of Instructing Handbook, FAA Fundamentals of Instruction and Certified Flight/ground instructor written exam study guides, FAA Private pilot and Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search



Barbering

  
  • BAR 101 - Principles of Barbering 1


    Credits: 6
    3 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: BAR 112C  

    Description
    This course provides an understanding of the history and profession of barbering while helping students develop life skills and promote professional image.  Students are instilled with an appreciation for one of the world’s oldest professions and maintain the continuation of the historical perspective for future generations of barbers.  Emphasis is on professionalism while students identify values and attitudes of goal setting, motivation, self-management and time management. 
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the history of barbering.
    2. Explain the importance of life skills in a professional setting.
    3. Model a professional image.
    4. Prepare work station according to State standards and best practices.
    5. Demonstrate proper sanitation, hygiene and safety practices.
    6. Model effective human relations and communications skills.
    Listed Topics
    1. Origin of the barber
    2. The rise of the barber-surgeons
    3. Modern barbers and the State Board of Barber Examiners
    4. The state of barbering today
    5. Time management
    6. Role playing in a lab and/or professional setting
    Reference Materials
    Internet and textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


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  • BAR 102 - Principles of Barbering 2


    Credits: 6
    3 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: BAR 112C  

    Description
    This course examines bacteriology including the growth, reproduction and relationship of bacteria to the spread of diseases.  Infection control and safe work practices as they relate to the barbershop are discussed.  Decontamination for the prevention and control of pathogen transmittal, demonstration of proper decontamination procedures for tools, equipment and surfaces are introduced.  Universal precautions and responsibility of a professional barber are identified along with the principal tools and implements of barbering.  The importance of anatomy and physiology to the professional are discussed along with chemistry, electricity and light therapy.  Emphasis of safety precautions includes investigation of properties and disorders of the skin, hair and scalp.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply best practices for infection control and maintaining safe work environments.
    2. Demonstrate effective use of barbering implements, tools and equipment.
    3. Describe general anatomy and physiology, chemistry and electricity as it relates to the barbering profession.
    4. Examine skin disorders through microscopic techniques.
    5. Analyze properties and disorders of hair and scalp.
    Listed Topics
    1. Infection control
    2. Implements, tools and equipment
    3. General anatomy and physiology
    4. Basics of chemistry
    5. Basics of electricity
    6. Skin
    7. Disorders of hair and scalp

    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BAR 103 - Principles of Barbering 3


    Credits: 6
    3 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BAR 101 , BAR 102 , BAR 112C  
    Co-requisites: BAR 113C  

    Description
    This course introduces students to draping procedures, scalp and facial massage and scalp treatments. Students identify the muscles, nerves and arteries affected by facial massage as well as treatments for the skin and skin care products.  Students are introduced to the facial shave procedure and the physiological structures and angles of the face using specific strokes of the shaving area.  Students gain proficiency in men’s haircutting, shampooing, styling, hair replacement measurements, construction, cutting, cleaning and alternative hair replacement methods.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify anatomical structures and muscles of the face and scalp.
    2. Perform facial massage using proper technique.
    3. Demonstrate the 14-step facial shave procedure.
    4. Cut and style men’s hair.
    5. Classify hair replacement systems and alternative methods of reconstruction.
    Listed Topics
    1. Treatment of the hair and scalp
    2. Men’s facial massage and treatments
    3. Shaving and facial hair design
    4. Men’s haircutting and styling
    5. Men’s hair replacement
    6. Hair replacement systems
    Reference Materials
    Internet and textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BAR 104 - Principles of Barbering 4


    Credits: 6
    3 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BAR 101 , BAR 102 , BAR 112C  
    Co-requisites: BAR 113C  

    Description
    This course introduces students to women’s haircutting and styling.  Topics include texturizing, wet styling, blow-drying, thermal curling and straightening techniques.  Additionally, students learn to complete chemical texture services while understanding the effects of the service on the hair.  Principles of color theory including hair coloring and lightening procedures are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will:

    1. Differentiate between various hair textures.
    2. Demonstrate proper women’s haircutting technique.
    3. Style women’s hair using a variety of common techniques including wet styling and blow-drying.
    4. Perform chemical and texture services on hair.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques for hair coloring and lightening.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hair textures
    2. Basic haircutting and styling for women
    3. Chemical texture services
    4. Characteristics and structure of hair
    5. Color theory
    Reference Materials
    Internet resources and textbook
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BAR 105 - Principles of Barbering 5


    Credits: 6
    3 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BAR 103 , BAR 104 , BAR 113C  
    Co-requisites: BAR 114C  

    Description
    This course prepares the student for the barbering career including topics such as barber shop management, job search skills and State Board licensing laws.  Students learn about the functions of a barber shop owner or manager and the different types of business ownership.  Topics include developing a business plan, advertising, designing floor plans, creating services and discussing retail sales techniques.  Students review goal setting and discuss the different industry positions available for barbers.  Resumes and portfolios are created.  Preparation for State Board Examinations and State Barber Board Rules and Regulations are examined. 
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the barber licensure requirements of the PA State Board of Barber Examiners.
    2. Define current industry trends and forms of business ownership.
    3. Demonstrate effective interviewing skills.
    4. Develop a business plan.
    5. Create advertisements, floor plans and services.
    6. Demonstrate retail sales techniques.
    7. Prepare a portfolio.
    Listed Topics
    1. Preparing for State Board exams
    2. Shaving
    3. Haircutting
    4. Facial massage
    5. Hair sectioning
    6. Hair coloring
    7. Hair texturizing
    8. Rules and regulations
    9. Industry trends
    10. Preparing for employment
    11. The employment interview
    12. Self-employment
    13. Operating a successful barbershop
    14. Selling in the barbershop
    Reference Materials
    Internet and textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BAR 112C - Barber Clinical 1


    Credits: 2
    150 Clinical Hours

    Co-requisites: BAR 101 , BAR 102  

    Description
    This course provides supervised clinical practice of various Barber skills and techniques learned in Principles of Barbering 1 and Principles of Barbering 2.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. 
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course students will:

    1. Display professional appearance and behavior.
    2. Employ effective time management skills.
    3. Develop communication skills that are professional in both oral and written fashion.
    4. Exercise dependability by successfully completing all clinic related assignments.
    5. Demonstrate safety in all aspects of the clinical experience.
    Listed Topics
    Various topics will be addressed and applied in this clinical experience as they relate to skills and techniques learned in BAR 101  and BAR 102  

     Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources as approved by instructor


    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BAR 113C - Barber Clinical 2


    Credits: 3
    200 Clinical Hours

    Co-requisites: BAR 103 , BAR 104  

    Description
    This course provides supervised clinical practice of various Barber skills and techniques learned in Principles of Barbering 1, Principles of Barbering 2, Principles of Barbering 3 and Principles of Barbering 4.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Display professional appearance and behavior.
    2. Employ effective time management skills.
    3. Develop communication skills that are professional in both oral and written fashion.
    4. Exercise dependability by successfully completing all clinic related assignments.
    5. Demonstrate safety in all aspects of the clinical experience.
    6. Perform various barbering techniques on clients.
    Listed Topics
    Various topics will be addressed and applied in this clinical experience as they relate to skills and techniques learned in BAR 103  and BAR 104 .

     Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources as approved by instructor


    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BAR 114C - Barber Clinical 3


    Credits: 4
    250 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BAR 103 BAR 104 , BAR 113C  
    Co-requisites: BAR 105  

    Description
    This course provides supervised clinical practice of various Barber skills and techniques learned in Principles of Barbering 1, Principles of Barbering 2, Principles of Barbering 3, Principles of Barbering 4 and Principles of Barbering 5.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

    1. Display professional appearance and behavior.
    2. Employ effective time management skills.
    3. Develop communication skills that are professional in both oral and written fashion.
    4. Exercise dependability by successfully completing all clinic related assignments.
    5. Demonstrate safety in all aspects of the clinical experience.
    6. Perform various barbering techniques on clients.
    Listed Topics
    Various topics will be addressed and applied in this clinical experience as they relate to skills and techniques learned in BAR 105 .

     Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources as approved by instructor


    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search



Biology

  
  • BIO 100 - Life Science


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to biology for non-biology majors. The course introduces fundamental concepts pertaining to the cell, multicellular organisms and environmental relationships. This course does not satisfy a biology requirement for the biology major.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe and apply the steps of the Scientific Method.
    2. Recognize science and biology in everyday life events.
    3. Identify and describe ecological environmental concerns.
    4. Describe the theory of inheritance, beginning with Mendel’s experiments and new Genetics.
    5. Identify and describe cell reproduction.
    6. Describe the evidence for mechanisms of evolution.
    7. Define and explain the chemistry of Life.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scientific Method
    2. Cells
    3. Genetics
    4. Ecology
    5. Environmental Biology
    6. Evolution
    7. Reproduction
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 08/01/2007


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  • BIO 103 - Introduction to Human Biology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course familiarizes students with the structure and function of the human body. It deals with the chemical, cellular and physiological principles on which human life is based. The normal organization and function of the body’s organ systems are covered along with selected disorders. This course does not satisfy a biology requirement for the biology major.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the application of the scientific method to the study of the human body.
    2. Identify the chemical principles that form the basis of human life.
    3. Characterize the major chemical components of the human body.
    4. Describe the organization of the cell and its parts.
    5. Explain the principles of cell membrane function.
    6. Delineate the cell’s need for and its means of acquiring energy.
    7. Distinguish among the major tissue types.
    8. Define homeostasis.
    9. Describe the structure and function of the organ systems of the human body
    10. Relate abnormalities and disorders to the normal structure and function of the body’s organ systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. The scientific method and the process of science in the study of human biology
    2. Atoms, molecules, chemical bonds and reactions
    3. Chemical composition of the human body
    4. Cell structure
    5. Cell membrane physiology
    6. Cellular metabolism
    7. The four primary tissues
    8. Homeostasis as the basis of human physiology
    9. The organ systems of the human body (including selected abnormalities and disorders):
    •  Cardiovascular system: heart, blood vessels, lymphatic circulation, blood
    •  Digestive system: digestive processes and nutrition
    •  Respiratory system: gas exchange
    •  Urinary system: excretion
    •  Skeletal system and articulations: support and movement
    •  Muscular system: locomotion
    •  Nervous system: integration and coordination
    •  Sensory reception: the world outside and in
    •  Endocrine system: integration and coordination II

     Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.


    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 10/18/2007


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  • BIO 107 - Pharmacology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to drug information for health professionals or paramedic personnel. This course surveys the pharmacokinetics of drugs, drug calculation, mechanisms of drug action, side effects and the toxic effects of drugs. Also included are specific clinical conditions and the underlying pathophysiology requiring drug intervention.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe specific information for drug use in clinical situations.
    2. Calculate drug dosages.
    3. Explain the components and abbreviations of a prescription.
    4. Describe the primary and secondary effects of drugs on selected organ systems.
    5. Define basic principles of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics.
    6. Explain side effects and toxic effects associated with drug administration.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to pharmacologic concepts and terminology
    2. Autonomic pharmacology and antihypertensive drugs
    3. Prescription writing and drug calculations
    4. Drugs influencing the central nervous system
    5. Drugs influencing the cardiovascular system
    6. Drugs used to treat allergic reactions
    7. Antibiotics/antimicrobial drugs
    8. Drugs influencing the endocrine system
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/26/2007


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  • BIO 110 - Introduction to Biological Science


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 100  (or EAL 100 ) and DVS 101  or DVS 103  (or EAL 101 )

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to fundamental life processes. Emphasis is on molecular biology that includes the study of micro and macro molecules. Cellular biology is also emphasized including structure, function, reproduction and genetics. This course incorporates an introduction to laboratory skills that includes the scientific method, metric system, and microscopy. Many institutions will accept this course as a science elective for non-biology majors. This course does not satisfy a biology requirement for biology majors. Students who plan on transferring to a four-year institution should consult a transfer counselor


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply the scientific method to interpret data and solve problems based on evidence.
    2. Detail atomic structure, types of chemical bonds and the relationship between molecular structure and function.
    3. Distinguish between the molecular structures for the four categories of biomolecules.
    4. Demonstrate the proper use of the compound light microscope to visualize cell structure.
    5. Connect the flow of information in Central Dogma of Biology.
    6. Compare the individual phases and outcomes of mitosis and meiosis.
    7. Summarize the major stages of cellular respiration.
    8. Perform Punnett square analysis to identify variations in the population with respect to genetic disorders.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scientific Method
    2. Metric system
    3. Microscopy
    4. Chemistry of life
    5. Cell structure and function
    6. Cellular respiration
    7. Mitosis and meiosis
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as required by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BIO 115 - Human Biology in Health and Disease


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to human anatomy and physiology and provides an overview of specific organ systems. The common diseases in each of the organ systems as well as common diagnostic procedures and therapeutic measures are studied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe homeostasis and its connection to feedback loops.
    2. Identify the structure and function of cell components.
    3. Classify the primary tissue types.
    4. Detail the structure and function of the integument, senses, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive and urinary systems.
    5. Explain the common diseases associated with each of the systems.
    6. Explain the diagnosis and treatment of common diseases associated with each of the systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cell structure and function
    2. Homeostasis
    3. Integumentary system
    4. Senses
    5. Skeletal system
    6. Muscular system
    7. Nervous system
    8. Endocrine system
    9. Cardiovascular system
    10. Lymphatic system
    11. Respiratory system
    12. Digestive system
    13. Urinary system
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/26/2007


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  • BIO 117 - Introduction to Nutrition


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course which introduces the principles of nutrition. The course stresses a scientific foundation for nutrition that allows students to develop a personal diet and dietary practices that are associated with good health. Emphasis is placed on nutritional literacy with regard to the distinguishing information based on science from information based on unsubstantiated claims.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the 6 nutrient classes.
    2. Describe the roles of the 6 nutrient classes in the body and proper portions in the diet.
    3. Delineate the basic structure and functions of the human digestive system.
    4. Explain human energy balance and the factors that affect intake and expenditure.
    5. Explain the mechanics of weight loss.
    6. Describe factors that contribute to maintenance of a healthy weight.
    7. Discuss implications of an active lifestyle on nutritional needs.
    8. Explain the effects of drugs on the body.
    9. Outline nutritional needs throughout the human lifecycle.
    10. Describe accepted practices related to food safety and major pathogens associated with food borne illness.
    Listed Topics
    1. Macro and micronutrients
    2. Food guide pyramids and label evaluation
    3. Carbohydrates, lipids, proteins
    4. Human digestion and absorption
    5. Vitamins, Minerals, Water
    6. Energy balance and weight maintenance
    7. Nutrition for Sports and Activities
    8. Alcohol
    9. Obesity
    10. Malnutrition
    11. Life cycle nutrition
    12. Food safety
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/14/2006


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  • BIO 120 - Human Reproduction and Sexually Transmitted Diseases


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course which introduces the anatomy and physiology of male and female reproductive systems along with topics such as pregnancy and contraception. The second part of the course focuses on human sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the function of DNA in the cellular processes of mitosis and meiosis.
    2. Describe the anatomy and physiology of male and female reproductive systems.
    3. Explain the physiology and endocrinology of human reproduction.
    4. Discuss selected contraceptive methods.
    5. Recognize health risks and problems associated with selected sexually transmitted disease.
    6. Explain treatments for sexually transmitted diseases.
    7. Describe the biology and pathology of selected sexually transmitted diseases.
    Listed Topics
    1. Mitosis and meiosis
    2. Anatomy of human reproductive organs
    3. Physiology of human reproductive organs
    4. Selected contraceptive methods
    5. Selected sexually transmitted diseases
    6. Medical and health challenges of human reproduction and sexually transmitted diseases
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/14/2006


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  • BIO 121 - Principles of Sustainability


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to allow a student to develop an understanding of sustainable systems from an environmental, economic and equity (social justice) point of view. Students will learn to critically evaluate these concepts when considering personal, business and community issues.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define sustainability terminology and its use by various groups.
    2. Identify the economic, environmental and equity aspects of sustainability issues.
    3. Summarize basic sustainability issues surrounding air quality, water availability, food and agriculture, energy and shelter.
    4. Incorporate tangible (economic) and intangible (environmental, equity) costs into the decision making process.
    5. Evaluate positive and negative trade-offs that sustainability solutions have on all community levels (family, state, faith, etc.).
    6. Assess the roles of technology and behavior modification when looking for sustainability solutions.
    7. Describe the challenges that population growth introduces for resolving sustainability issues.
    Listed Topics
    1. Fundamentals of sustainability
    2. History of the sustainability movement
    3. Sustainability and population growth
    4. Economics of sustainability
    5. Community perspectives
    6. Sustainable environments
    7. Renewable vs. sustainability resources
    8. Designing sustainability
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


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  • BIO 123 - Medical Biology and Terminology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course that develops a working knowledge of the medical biology and terminology used by medical personnel. It familiarizes students with basic terms in anatomy, physiology and the pathology of the human body. The terminology is presented system by system. This course does not fulfill the science requirement for graduation in a degree program.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify medical terms by dividing them into component parts.
    2. Use proper phonetic pronunciation of medical terms.
    3. Spell medical terms correctly.
    4. Identify accepted medical abbreviations.
    5. Relate medical terms to the structure and function of the human body.
    6. Relate medical terms involved in disease processes in the human body.
    7. Relate terminology to clinical procedures and tests.
    Listed Topics
    1. Origin of medical terms and basic word structure (roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining vowels)
    2. Rules that govern the pronunciation and formation of medical terms
    3. Accepted abbreviations used by medical personnel
    4. Relating medical terminology to the anatomy, physiology, and pathological conditions of selected systems
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/26/2007


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  • BIO 128 - Introduction to Astrobiology, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed for students who have an interest in the origin of life on earth and the possibility of finding life on planets, moons or exoplanets. Topics will examine our current understanding of what early earth looked like, possible explanations of where and how life arose on earth, how prebiotic chemistry may lead to biology and the search for life beyond planet earth.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the inter-relatedness of all life on earth.
    2. Identify the chemical principles and components that form the basis of life on earth.
    3. Define what life is.
    4. Describe the organization and evolution of life on earth.
    5. Explain the theories of how life may have arisen on earth.
    6. Describe what early earth may have been like.
    7. Describe the relationship of earth’s geological history and history of life on earth.
    8. Relate habitability of other planets to the possibility of life.
    9. Explain how exoplanets are discovered and how to search for extraterrestrial life.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction
    2. What is Life
    3. How Did Earth and Its Biosphere Originate
    4. How Have Earth and Its Biosphere Evolved
    5. What Does Life on Earth Tell Us about Habitability
    6. What Is Known about Potentially Habitable Worlds beyond Earth
    7. What Are the Signs of Life That We Could Use to Look for Life beyond Earth
    8. What Relevance Does Astrobiology Have to the Future of Life on This Planet
    Reference Materials
    Required Materials: Textbook, Internet access, NetID from CCAC, CCAC Academic Email
    Address (See Course Email Policy Below)
    Recommended Text(s): None
    Audio-Visual Materials: Various audio visual materials are present on the Blackboard
    site for this course, including video clips, PowerPoint presentations and Internet links.


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  • BIO 133 - Environmental Science


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course uses a variety of source materials to assist students in developing an understanding of the multifaceted nature of environmental science problems and solutions as well as the impact of human activity on the environment and human health.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss the multidisciplinary nature of environmental science.
    2. Explain the basic biology behind environmental issues.
    3. Compare the environmental impact of population numbers against consumption patterns.
    4. Summarize human effects on the environment, including climate change.
    5. Describe the effect of environmental science topics such as toxins, air quality, and water quality on human health.
    6. Summarize human renewable and nonrenewable energy use.
    7. Describe sustainable strategies to mitigate human effects on the environment.
    8. Use data to analyze an environmental issue or problem.
    9. Defend positions on scientific issues using material synthesized from articles, videos, guest speakers or other valid sources regarding environmental issues.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to environmental science
    2. Population
    3. Nutrient cycling
    4. Toxins
    5. Air quality and climate change
    6. Water quality
    7. Energy use
    8. Waste
    9. Sustainability
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary learning materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Information Literacy
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/14/2020


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  • BIO 140 - Food Microbiology


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This is a course intended for non-science majors who require a basic knowledge of microbes affecting food. The course provides a broad introduction to cells and their components, the distinct features of microbes and their role in food spoilage and food borne illnesses. Additional topics discussed include: aseptic techniques, food testing and the effectiveness of sanitation techniques.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the structure and describe the function of cellular components.
    2. List and describe the primary microbes involved in both food production and food handling.
    3. Explain the process of disease transmission in food and water.
    4. Explain the challenges in sanitation as it relates to food handling.
    5. Trace the flow of food through the food handling process.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cell structure and function
    2. Microbes and microbial growth
    3. Transmission of disease via food and water
    4. Sanitation in the production and handling of food
    5. Standards for sanitation of food facilities and equipment
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/26/2007


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  • BIO 150 - Environmental Seminar


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course deals with the identification of and the possible solutions for regional environmental issues. Students learn to critically evaluate these concepts while considering personal, business and community issues. Local experts discuss environmental topics with students and field trips to appropriate local sites are taken.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe selected environmental issues affecting the local region.
    2. Develop solutions to local regional environmental issues by critically evaluating evidence.
    3. Analyze ethical issues pertaining to the environmental field.
    4. Compare different careers available in the environmental industry, particularly with regard to local opportunities.
    5. Develop basic skills (writing reports, reading journal articles, effective verbal communication) necessary for employment in the environmental industry.
    Listed Topics
    1. Waste water runoff
    2. Air pollution from coal powered plants
    3. Fracking for natural gas.
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • BIO 151 - General Biology 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  and MAT 108 ; and BIO 110  or two high school science classes (one a biology with lab) with a grade of C or better in the last five years.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to atomic structure, important bioorganic molecules, cellular structure and function, cellular reproduction, genetic principles and biotechnology. Selected topics include an overview of cellular biochemistry, with emphasis on cellular respiration and photosynthesis. The accompanying laboratory program allows students to practice scientific procedures by conducting investigations which are coordinated with lecture topics. This course transfers to most four-year institutions. Students should consult a transfer counselor.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Formulate a hypothesis, make a prediction and design an experiment to test the validity of a hypothesis.
    2. Explain the structure of an atom, the nature of atomic bonds, and the reactivity of elements.
    3. List and define the unique characteristics of water that make it essential to life.
    4. Summarize the structure and characteristics of the four classes of macromolecules necessary for life.
    5. Summarize the structure and function of the cell, including cell organelles, cell membranes and cellular metabolism.
    6. Identify the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
    7. Explain the difference(s) between mitosis and meiosis.
    8. Explain the structure and function of DNA, including DNA replication, transcription, and translation.
    9. Explain and apply the principles of Mendelian genetics.
    10. Apply the principles of biotechnology to explain DNA cloning, genetic engineering and genetic disease testing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scientific process: solving problems
    2. Basic chemistry for biology
    3. Cell structure and function
    4. Cell division
    5. Photosynthesis
    6. Cellular respiration
    7. Mendelian genetics
    8. Molecular genetics
    9. Protein synthesis
    10. Overview of biotechnology
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and student study guide, laboratory manual, lecture handouts, laboratory models and dissections, specimens, and lecture and laboratory videos.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


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  • BIO 152 - General Biology 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  

     
    Description
    In this course there is an emphasis on plants and animals, particularly with regard to evolution, phylogeny and physiology. Darwinian principles of evolution and natural selection are underlying themes throughout the semester. Also included is a study of population genetics and mechanisms of speciation and conservation biology. Students are introduced to the development of organ systems throughout plant and animal groups. The laboratory program presents the domain and kingdom classification systems from the viewpoint of phylogeny and anatomy.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the evidence for Darwinian evolution.
    2. Explain and apply the mathematical theory of population genetics.
    3. Explain the scientific theories for the origin of life.
    4. Identify plant structures and explain their role in plant processes.
    5. Compare and contrast organ systems throughout animal phyla.
    6. Identify the main structure and physiological functions of animal organ systems.
    7. Identify specific organisms within the Domain and Kingdom classifications.
    8. Explain basic principles of animal behavior.
    9. Define conservation biology and ecological concepts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Darwin; historical background and evidence for evolution
    2. Population genetics and speciation
    3. Origin of life; scientific theories and evidence
    4. Structure of prokaryotes
    5. Plant structure and function
    6. Animal structure and function
    7. Phylogeny of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals
    8. Terminology and general concepts of animal behavior
    9. Conservation biology and ecological concepts
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and student study guide and laboratory manual, lecture handouts, laboratory models and dissection specimens, and lecture and laboratory videos.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


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  • BIO 160 - Introduction to Human Pathology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 110  or BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the major medical and surgical diseases. Basic biological concepts essential to the understanding of diseases and disease processes are stressed. Etiology, diagnoses and stages of the disease process are presented.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify cellular responses to injury in the body.
    2. Examine cells and tissues in normal and diseased conditions.
    3. Demonstrate basic defense mechanisms of the body and immune disorders.
    4. Describe basic concepts of the role of microbiology with diseases.
    5. Evaluate the general nature, course and clinical manifestations of major diseases of body systems.
    6. Explain basic procedures used in diagnosis of diseases.
    7. Describe the epidemiology, etiology and pathology of a disease process using medical references.
    Listed Topics
    1. General concepts of disease and defining characteristics
    2. Diseases affecting the body as a whole
    3. Immune system response (specific and non-specific defenses)
    4. Diseases of specific body systems
    5. Diagnostic procedures
    6. Epidemiology of certain prevalent diseases
    Reference Materials
    Textbook/materials as deemed appropriate by the instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • BIO 161 - Anatomy & Physiology 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 110  or BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This is a course in systemic human biology for students in allied health, nursing, physical education and other fields requiring a background in human biology. The focus of the course is normal anatomy and physiology, with reference to pathological situations as appropriate. The course focuses on body organization; tissues; and the integumentary, skeletal-articular, muscular, nervous and the endocrine systems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the structure and function of the integument, skeletal (articulations), muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.
    2. Communicate effectively in the medical field using proper anatomical terminology including regional and directional terms.
    3. Apply the concept of feedback loops in homeostasis under normal conditions and in common clinical disorders.
    4. Distinguish between major human tissue types according to form, function and location. 
    5. Analyze information utilizing case studies to solve anatomical and physiological problems.
    6. Demonstrate basic laboratory and microscopic techniques relevant to the field of anatomy and physiology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Homeostasis and anatomical terminology
    2. Histology
    3. Integumentary dystem
    4. Osseous tissue and skeletal system
    5. Articulations
    6. Muscular tissue and muscles
    7. Nervous tissue
    8. Central nervous system
    9. Peripheral nervous system
    10. Sense Organs - general and special
    11. Autonomic nervous system
    12. Endocrine system
    Reference Materials
    Textbook/materials as required by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BIO 162 - Anatomy & Physiology 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161  

     
    Description
    This is a course in systemic human biology for students in allied health, nursing, physical education and other fields requiring a background in human biology. The focus of the course is normal anatomy and physiology, with reference to pathological situations as appropriate. The course includes the reproductive, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, acid-base/fluid/ electrolyte balance, urinary and digestive systems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the structure and function of the cardiovascular, immune (lymphatic), respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems.
    2. Communicate effectively in the medical field using proper anatomical terminology.
    3. Apply the concept of feedback loops in homeostasis under normal conditions and in common clinical disorders.
    4. Explain the role of blood in regulation of pressure, fluid, nutrients, wastes, electrolytes and pH balance in the body.
    5. Analyze information utilizing case studies to solve anatomical and physiological problems.
    6. Demonstrate basic laboratory and microscopic techniques relevant to the field of anatomy and physiology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Circulatory system: heart, blood vessels, blood
    2. Lymphatic system and immunity
    3. Respiratory system
    4. Acid-Base, fluid, and electrolyte balance
    5. Respiratory system
    6. Digestive system
    7. Reproductive system
    Reference Materials
    Textbook/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BIO 175 - Microbiology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 110  or BIO 151  with a grade of “C” or higher

     
    Description
    This is a course in microbiology for students in allied health, nursing and other fields requiring a background in microbiology.  Students study microorganisms with an emphasis on those that are pathogenic. Topics include epidemiology, immunology and control of microbes. Basic microbiological laboratory techniques such as principles of asepsis and identification of microorganisms are performed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss microbial cell and viral biology. 
    2. Evaluate physical and chemical methods of microbial control.
    3. Explain the dynamics of host-pathogen interactions including the microbiome.
    4. Describe the normal and immunocompromised body defenses against infectious disease.
    5. Explain the mechanism of vaccines and their role in community health maintenance. 
    6. Describe the common medically important microbe groups.  
    7. Describe the basic principles of epidemiology.
    8. Explain how ubiquity of microorganisms influences health procedures such as handling specimens and infection control in health care and community settings.
    9. Demonstrate aseptic technique and other basic laboratory procedures.
    10. Interpret the results of laboratory exercises.    
    Listed Topics
    1. Anatomy and physiology of prokaryotic cells                     
    2. Viruses                    
    3. Host-pathogen interactions and the microbiome
    4. Body defenses against pathogens
    5. Vaccines and public health    
    6. Common medically important microbes
    7. Epidemiology and selected human infectious diseases
    8. Aseptic technique      
    9. Methods of studying microbes
    10. Microbial control
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, laboratory manual and/or handouts, videos and computer enhancements.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • BIO 181 - Biology of Wallops Island, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a directed exploration of the natural history and biodiversity of Wallops Islands. Students will experience the ecology of a dynamic coastal system through the school programs offered by Chincoteague Bay Field Station.  The Field Station is located on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, between the Atlantic Ocean and ecologically important Chesapeake Bay. The barrier islands of the Eastern Shore create a series of close-by habitats that are biologically diverse and geologically dynamic. These natural classrooms introduce students to a variety of concepts in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences. The core of the course will consist of a Friday to Sunday visit to the Marine Science Consortium located in Wallops Island.  Students will explore a variety of terrestrial and marine habitats to observe animals and plants in the wild, as well as visiting conservation facilities and evolutionary research stations. Some preparatory coursework will take place before the trip itself.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

    1. Identify and describe the unique animals and plants of Wallops Islands
    2. Recognize the critical ecological significance of the islands and similar “living laboratories”
    3. Describe the relationship between geography and evolution
    4. Learn techniques for direct observation of animal behavior in the wild
    5. Describe the species found in Wallops Island through trawling, wetlands and beach investigations.
    6. Describe the evidence for mechanisms of evolution and adaptation to specific environments
    7. Understand the effects of human activity on isolated ecosystems and the importance of conservation
    8. Identify organisms living in Wallops Island collected in field in lab using microscopes
    Listed Topics
    1. Biogeography
    2. Ecology
    3. Environmental Biology
    4. Evolution
    5. Environmental Science
    6. Field Study
    7. Zoology
    8. Sustainability
    Reference Materials
    REFERENCE, RESOURCE OR LEARNING MATERIALS TO BE USED BY STUDENT:

    Directed readings on topics related to the ecology and environmental science to Chincoteague Bay Field Station/Marine Science Consortium, natural history of Wallops Island, including http://www.cbfieldstation.org/ and related articles on specific organisms and habitats studied.



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  • BIO 201 - Botany


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This is a course that includes a detailed examination of the plant kingdom with the major concentration on the vascular plants. The major plant divisions are studied with respect to their anatomy, physiology, life cycles, evolution and ecology. A comparison of bacteria, algae, fungi and higher plants is included in the course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe plant evolution emphasizing the relationship between green plants, bacteria, algae and fungi.
    2. Explain the life cycles of plants within the major divisions.
    3. Relate anatomical structures with their physiological functions.
    4. Describe photosynthesis.
    5. Summarize plant growth, reproduction and development with hormonal interactions.
    6. List plant nutritional needs.
    7. Explain plant ecology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Plant evolution
    2. Plant life cycles
    3. Plant anatomy and physiology
    4. Photosynthesis
    5. Plant growth, reproduction and development
    6. Plant hormones
    7. Plant nutritional needs
    8. Plant ecology
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/26/2007


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  • BIO 207 - Genetics


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the principles involved in the transmission of inherited characteristics, as revealed by classical and modern investigations. Special concepts include the chromosome theory, cytogenetics and genetic imbalance, mechanisms and significance of DNA mutation and DNA repair, Mendelian and multifactorial inheritance, the chemical structure of genes, applied molecular genetics, gene expression and regulation of gene action.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain cell reproduction including mitosis, meiosis and the cell cycle.
    2. Contrast single gene, polygenic and multifactorial inheritance patterns.
    3. Illustrate the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype.
    4. Explain the structure, function and cellular location of different nucleic acids.
    5. Describe the different types of DNA mutation, mutational mechanisms and DNA repair.
    6. Apply common principles and procedures related to recombinant DNA technologies.
    7. Employ basic laboratory techniques used in molecular and genetic analysis.
    8. Describe the underlying genetic mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis.
    9. Evaluate human genetic diversity and its role in human disease, health and evolution.

     Listed Topics

    1. Cell reproduction (cell cycle, mitosis, meiosis)
    2. Mendel’s principles
    3. Complex patterns of inheritance
    4. Cytogenetics and chromosomes
    5. DNA structure, replication and gene organization
    6. Principles of recombinant DNA, biotechnology and genetic testing in humans
    7. Gene expression
    8. DNA mutation and repair
    9. Basic laboratory techniques and analysis in genetics
    10. Cancer genetics
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/27/2020


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  • BIO 209 - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 115  or BIO 162  

     
    Description
    This is a course which provides a conceptual and technical presentation of cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology for students in specific health programs.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe structure and function of cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
    2. Summarize the components and functions of blood and the immune system.
    3. Explain the principles of homeostasis as applied to body fluids, electrolytes and acid base balance.
    4. List clinical symptoms of selected cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.
    5. Determine appropriate treatment and therapeutic goals for specific cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.
    Listed Topics
    1. Anatomy and physiology of the heart and blood vessels
    2. Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
    3. Body fluids, electrolytes and acid base balance
    4. Selected cardiovascular and respiratory diseases
    5. Treatment and therapeutic goals of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and acid base disorders
    6. Components and functions of blood
    7. Components and functions of the immune system
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/14/2006


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  • BIO 212 - Radiobiology


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  or BIO 161  

     
    Description
    This is a course which introduces the properties of different types of radiation and their biological effects, both beneficial and harmful. The course details the effects of radiation at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ system level.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify radiosensitive components of the cell.
    2. Discuss radiation effects on the cell cycle.
    3. Describe factors influencing radiation response of cells and tissues.
    4. Differentiate between direct and indirect effects of ionizing radiation.
    5. Evaluate factors influencing radiobiologic/biophysical events at the cellular and subcellular level.
    6. Explain the concept of LD50/30.
    7. List the effects of electromagnetic and particulate radiation on cells and tissues.
    8. Explain the Laws of Bergonie and Tribondeau.
    9. Compare the relationship of time, dose, fractionation, volume and site to radiation effects.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cell biology review
    2. Cellular response to radiation
    3. Direct and indirect effects of radiation
    4. Modification of cell and tissue response to radiation and the concept of LD 50/30
    5. Laws of Bergonie and Tribondeau
    6. Variations in radiation effects due to time, dose, fraction and volume
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/14/2006


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  • BIO 216 - Cell Biology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This is a course which emphasizes the relationships between the molecular structure of organisms and their functions. Regulation of cell processes in response to changes in both the intra and extra cellular environment are discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Characterize the structure and properties of the four key classes of cellular macromolecules.
    2. Summarize the structure and function of the cell and organelles.
    3. Relate cell structure to specific cellular disease.
    4. Describe cell membrane structure and its role in cell transport.
    5. Summarize the cell energy metabolic pathways.
    6. Describe signal transduction mechanisms.
    7. Describe enzyme structure and function and its relationship to bioenergetics.
    8. Explain cell movement with relationship to both extracellular and intracellular compartments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Bioorganic macromolecules
    2. Cell structure and function
    3. Cellular basis of disease
    4. Membrane structure and transport
    5. Cellular metabolism
    6. Signal transduction
    7. Bioenergetics
    8. Cell movement
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/14/2006


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  • BIO 230 - Research Methodology/Quality Assurance


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151 , MAT 108  

     
    Description
    This course provides students with the basics of conducting proper scientific research in a laboratory. Specific topics include process of science, use of scientific literature sources, critical article review and analysis, presentation of experimental data and basic methods and procedures of quality assurance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe how scientific research is conducted in a laboratory.
    2. Distinguish between different types of experimental designs.
    3. Determine the proper presentation of experimental data and corresponding statistics.
    4. Conduct comprehensive scientific literature reviews.
    5. Critique scientific journal articles.
    6. Write a research proposal.
    7. Employ proper documentation/techniques in the laboratory to measure accuracy and precision.
    8. Run assays that include appropriate quality control samples.
    9. Analyze quality control sample data to support routine data quality in biological systems.
    10. Create histograms and control charts from sample data and interpret.
    Listed Topics
    1. Science as a process
    2. Experimental design and analysis
    3. Experimental data (presentation and interpretation)
    4. Database of scientific literature sources
    5. Understanding a scientific article (reading/critiquing)
    6. Research proposals
    7. Procedures for quality control
    8. Skill standards for bio-science industry workers
    Reference Materials
    Textbook/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BIO 240 - Environmental Biology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This is a course which introduces the diverse elements that make up an organism’s environment. Biotic and abiotic factors which influence the environment are studied along with energy flow through ecosystems. Population and community structures are studied with regard to stability and change. The effects of human intervention on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are discussed. Students may be expected to participate in field experiences off campus and for extended periods of time.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify theoretical constructs of an ecosystem.
    2. Describe energy flow within an ecosystem.
    3. Explain biogeochemical cycles.
    4. Identify and summarize factors which affect population growth cycles.
    5. Explain the structure and function of communities.
    6. Apply ecological concepts to current environmental concerns and issues.
    7. Perform basic methods of gathering ecological data through laboratory and field experience.
    Listed Topics
    1. Ecosystem structure
    2. Energy flow in ecosystems
    3. Biogeochemical cycles
    4. Population growth and regulation
    5. Community stability and change
    6. Aquatic ecosystems
    7. Terrestrial ecosystems
    8. Human intervention in ecosystems
    9. Field experience using common lab methods and protocols
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/14/2006


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  • BIO 241 - Pathophysiology


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161 , BIO 162  

     
    Description
    This course provides an in depth study of the predisposing factors and direct causes of diseases, as well as their effects on the body. The course includes a systemic approach to the basic disease process in terms of etiology, symptomatology, general pathological changes, diagnostic procedures and treatments.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain why and how diseases occur as per homeostatic mechanisms.
    2. Identify the mechanism and response of cells to inflammation, tissue injury and cell death.
    3. Discuss pathophysiology associated with disorders of the endocrine, immune, circulatory, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal and nervous systems.
    4. Interpret common laboratory and diagnostic tests as they impact patient evaluation.
    5. Describe the following aspects of significant diseases: incidence or prevalence, cause, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis.
    6. Analyze information utilizing case studies in successful clinical problem-solving.
    7. Evaluate health articles, medical journals and other forms of data related to pathophysiology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cell responses to inflammation, tissue injury and tissue death
    2. Etiological agents
    3. General pathophysiological changes
    4. Signs and symptoms of disease
    5. Diagnostic procedures
    6. Therapy and treatment protocols
    7. Prognostic indicators with morbidity and mortality
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and contemporary learning materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • BIO 251 - Biology of the Galápagos Islands, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a directed exploration of the natural history and biodiversity of the Galápagos Islands.  Students will retrace the famous journey of Charles Darwin, and study the unique indigenous wildlife of the islands, as well as the evolutionary and biogeographic forces that shaped this extraordinary ecosystem. The core of the course will consist of a nine-day visit to the Galápagos Islands, during which students will explore a variety of terrestrial and marine habitats to observe animals and plants in the wild, as well as visiting conservation facilities and evolutionary research stations. Some preparatory coursework will take place before the trip itself.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and describe the unique animals and plants of the Galápagos Islands.
    2. Recognize the critical ecological significance of the islands and similar “living laboratories”.
    3. Describe the relationship between geography and evolution.
    4. Learn techniques for direct observation of animal behavior in the wild.
    5. Describe the history of the Galápagos Islands and their role in Charles Darwin’s research.
    6. Describe the evidence for mechanisms of evolution and adaptation to specific environments.
    7. Understand the effects of human activity on isolated ecosystems and the importance of conservation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Biogeography
    2. Ecology
    3. Environmental Biology
    4. Evolution
    5. History of Science
    6. Field Study
    7. Zoology
    Reference Materials
    Directed readings on topics related to the ecology and natural history of the Galápagos Islands, including The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, The Beak of the Finch by Jonathan Weiner and articles on specific organisms and habitats studied.


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  • BIO 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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Biotechnology

  
  • BTC 100 - Survey of Biotechnology and Bioethics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces both non-science and science majors to the fields of biotechnology and bioethics.  Topics include the history of DNA technology, contemporary DNA technology, molecular biology methodology, agricultural biotechnology and commercial biological applications.  Additionally, discussion will focus on bioethics, social and legal aspects of biological research and ethical decision making in the laboratory.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of DNA structure and its role in protein synthesis.
    2. Apply basic knowledge of recombinant DNA technology used in biomedical research.
    3. Report biotechnology methods in medicine, pharmaceutical and agricultural enterprises.
    4. Demonstrate skills necessary for reading and evaluating scientific literature.
    5. Identify ethical issues that arise from biotechnology.
    6. Evaluate relevant ethical principles utilizing specific case studies.
    7. Determine ethical responsibility for the use of biotechnology in both industry and academic venues.
    Listed Topics
    1. DNA and RNA structure and function
    2. Protein structure and function
    3. Recombinant DNA technology
    4. Careers in biotechnology
    5. Bioethics
    6. Research ethics
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society and Citzenship
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BTC 101 - Lab Techniques in Cellular Biology and Histology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  and MAT 108  

     
    Description
    This course introduces the basic concepts and laboratory skills used in a biotechnology workplace.  Laboratory skills  emphasized include micropipetting, dilutions, preparing physiological solutions and spectroscopy.  Modern and classic techniques used to determine cellular structure and enzymatic function will be explored.  Students will become competent performing laboratory protocols including tissue embedding, staining, cell culture and immunohistochemistry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare common physiological solutions for laboratory use.
    2. Utilize precise measuring, sterile technique and light microscopy.
    3. Maintain a laboratory notebook and digital photo atlas.
    4. Demonstrate basic histological techniques.
    5. Develop skills to maintain cells in culture.
    6. Assemble analyzed experimental data.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety in the laboratory
    2. Laboratory measurements and solutions
    3. Laboratory notebooks and data collection
    4. Operation of scientific instruments
    5. Structural organization of the cell
    6. Staining techniques
    7. Immunofluorescence
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as required by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BTC 103 - Bioinformatics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BTC 101  and MAT 165  

     
    Description
    This course provides an introduction to some of the important fundamental skills sets in bioinformatics. In-depth descriptions of methods and algorithms provide background, while hand-on experience with software provides practical experience. Concepts and approaches to DNA and amino acid sequence alignment, homology, conserved domain identification, phylogenetic inference, array-based transcriptomics, quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis and peptide identification searches are presented. Basic computer skills are required.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify molecular biology of genes, transcription and translation beyond basic principles of the central dogma.
    2. Solve biological questions using biological databases containing sequences, clinical and structural information.
    3. Retrieve information from biological databases.
    4. Perform structure/function analysis of biological molecules using information obtained from database searches.
    5. Perform DNA/protein sequence alignment and analysis as a result of database queries, specifically identifying homologs and conserved domains.
    6. Identify differentially expressed genes from analysis of a microarray data set.
    7. Interpret the output of a quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) experimental data.
    8. Define peptide identification search algorithms given proteomics profile.
    Listed Topics
    1. Central dogma of genetics
    2. Database searching methods and sequence comparison
    3. DNA /protein sequence alignment and analysis
    4. Interpretation of microarray data sets
    5. Interpretation of (qRT-PCR) experiments
    6. Interpretation of proteomic profiles
    Reference Materials
    Textbook/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BTC 202 - Molecular Biology Laboratory


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BTC 101  or BIO 207  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to modern molecular biology theory and laboratory practices.  Special topics will include advanced molecular biology methods used in protein and nucleic acid analysis, enzyme-mediated reactions, genetic transformations, DNA sequence interpretation and gene amplification.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Contrast agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocols.
    2. Employ molecular techniques to isolate and characterize nucleic acids and proteins.
    3. Apply enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques to biomedical problems.
    4. Interpret enzyme mediated biochemical reaction rates.
    5. Perform experiments to study restriction enzyme activity.
    6. Compare Southern blot analysis of DNA and Western blot analysis of proteins.
    7. Interpret DNA sequencing data
    8. Apply the polymerase chain reaction to amplify target DNA.
    9. Perform RNA analysis using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.
    10. Execute basic laboratory techniques used in genetic transformation of bacteria.
    Listed Topics
    1. DNA and protein isolation and separation using electrophoresis
    2. Enzyme rates of reactions
    3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)
    4. Western blot analysis of protein
    5. Restriction enzyme analysis
    6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
    7. DNA and RNA isolation and analysis
    8. Southern blot analysis of DNA
    9. DNA sequencing analysis
    10. Bacterial cell transformation
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/27/2020


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  • BTC 204P - Biotechnology Internship


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours 120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: BTC 202  and Cumulative GPA 2.0

     
    Description
    This course provides practical work experience at one of the affiliated biotech industries or university research facilities. Techniques learned in biology/biotechnology labs are applied in an actual laboratory setting to give the student more experience while learning practical applications for laboratory procedures.  Performance evaluation of student by faculty coordinator and employer.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Write competency-based goals to support specific laboratory skills to be utilized in experiments.
    2. Construct a logbook or research notebook of all laboratory/work-related experiences.
    3. Demonstrate personal and professional skills, including an acceptable work record, as required by host laboratory.
    4. Evaluate protocols using proper equipment to collect data in the laboratory.
    5. Summarize the internship experience in a written document, outlining laboratory techniques utilized in the internship.
    Listed Topics
    1. Topics will be determined by nature of internship experience.
    Reference Materials
    Will be provided by faculty coordinator and employer
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • BTC 280 - Adv Topics in Biology and Biotechnology Seminar


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 151  

     
    Description
    This seminar exposes students to contemporary biological topics presented by faculty experts.  Topics include immunology, tissue engineering, environmental sustainability, neurology, cancer biology, pathophysiology and forensic analysis.  Students will learn about local workforce opportunities by regional corporations.  Emphasis is placed on building critical thinking skills through discussion of concepts through examination of articles and lecture.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the role of the immune system in biotechnology applications.
    2. Classify scaffold materials utilized in tissue repair and regeneration.
    3. Identify regional environmental biology key concepts.
    4. Differentiate nervous system role in controlling body functions.
    5. Compare signal transduction pathways for cancer disease progression.
    6. Identify abnormal physiology and histology in diseased tissue.
    7. Distinguish data collection and interpretation utilized in forensic analysis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Immunology
    2. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering
    3. Environmental biotechnology
    4. Neurology
    5. Cancer biology
    6. Pathophysiology
    7. Forensic analysis
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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Building Construction Technology

  
  • BLC 103 - Construction Planning and Control


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course in the step-by-step procedures and organizational planning necessary for program construction projects using Critical Path Method (CPM). Topics include manual and computer methods of construction, job scheduling, organization and time planning, CPM networking and monitoring of construction progress, cost controlling and determining the applications and advantages of the CPM.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the building and break down its elements.
    2. Prioritize the sequence of construction elements.
    3. Identify parallel processing elements.
    4. Assign time per task and schedule the sequence of events as per the CPM process.
    5. Set up CPM schedules using appropriate computer programs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Scheduling
    2. Requirements for Construction Schedules
    3. Participants in the Construction Process
    4. Instruction of Project Schedule Methods
    5. Uses of Construction Project Schedules
    6. Task Definition
    7. Definition of a Task
    8. Task Attributes
    9. Work Breakdown
    10. Logic Diagrams and the Critical Path Method (CPM)
    11. Introduction
    12. Essential Terms
    13. Logical Relationships
    14. Symbols
    15. Rules of Job Planning
    16. Steps in Network Planning
    17. Rules for Numbering Nodes
    Reference Materials
    “Means Schedule Manual,” F. Williams Horsley, Robert Snow Means Company, Inc. Industry Publications and Articles
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • BLC 121 - Construction Materials and Methods


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a comprehensive analysis of building materials, products, processes, and systems used in various types of building construction. Students will investigate material usage, building systems and methods of construction. Additionally, students will evaluate techniques covering material performance, selection and building construction installation procedures.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Interpret performance requirements used for evaluation and selection of products, materials, or systems for a construction project.
    2. Differentiate between the best practices and challenges related to material installation.
    3. Investigate and evaluate design concepts, structural concepts, materials, methods of construction and equipment available in construction.
    4. Appraise the interdependent aspects of the overall building design process and the application of current and new technology to materials and construction methods.
    5. Discuss the selection and installation of green materials in new and renovated buildings.
    Listed Topics
    1. Materials
    2. Properties, Performance, Limitations
    3. Design Concepts
    4. Structural Concepts
    5. Methods of Construction
    6. Equipment
    7. New Materials
    Reference Materials
    Industry Publications
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • BLC 191 - Construction Industry Supervision


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    In this course students will study human relations, with an emphasis on the subject of motivational strategies. Students will learn how to develop their leadership and supervisory potential through communication analysis and effective problem solving techniques.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify their leadership styles and evaluate their effectiveness.
    2. Illustrate communication barriers and practice written and oral solutions.
    3. Apply principles of motivation in problem solving scenarios.
    4. Describe and employ through role playing best practices in supervisory leadership techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Leadership Skills
    2. Construction Project Scheduling
    3. Principles of Motivation
    4. Effective Problem Solving
    5. Best Practices in Supervision

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • BLC 192 - Construction Contracting


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will present the overall picture of project management, including its function, objectives and preparation strategies. Practices for the execution of projects will be outlined and discussed. This course will be presented from the point of view of an operating construction company and its organization.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain construction contracting business methods and business ownership contracts and contract bonds.
    2. Set up insurance, cost estimating and bidding plans.
    3. Prepare project planning and scheduling details.
    4. Analyze construction cost accounting.
    Listed Topics
    1. Project planning
    2. Scheduling
    3. Time, money, performance
    4. Cost estimating
    5. Project management scheduling and control Ttchniques: CPM, PERT, etc.
    Reference Materials
    Industry Publications
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/31/2017


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  • BLC 203 - Surveying


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Knowledge of basic trigonometry.

     
    Description
    This course focuses on building site layout and preparation. Studies include surveying techniques, adjustment and care of surveying equipment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate measurement of distance, direction and angles.
    2. Collect and document field data.
    3. Transfer field data and notes to survey drawings.
    4. Perform basic surveying calculations.
    5. Operate and maintain surveying equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Measurement techniques and instruments
    2. Field data collection at the job site
    3. Plotting of field data to survey drawings
    4. Basic surveying calculations
    5. Operation and maintenance of surveying equipment
    Reference Materials
    Surveying equipment, surveying text.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/31/2017


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  • BLC 205 - Project Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    In this course, students will learn how project management roles are changing as innovative contracts, alternate delivery systems, alternative dispute resolution and creative project financing are increasingly changing how projects are  administered.  The modern project manager has more information available than ever before and information technology is changing rapidly.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the function of project manager on a construction project.
    2. Explain the various forms of project delivery methods and the underlying principles for choosing the appropriate system.
    3. Identify the pre-construction process including: financing, estimating, scheduling, float, life cycle costing, constructability reviews, value engineering and special contract requirements.
    4. Coordinate procurement with the construction schedule.
    5. Report costs of material and equipment.
    6. Demonstrate the elements of an effective Quality Control program.
    7. Interpret techniques to assess and manage operational risk.
    8. Explain the value of Building Information Modeling (BIM).
    9. Describe the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) point system.
    Listed Topics
    1. Organizing and Leading the Construction Project
    2. Project Delivery Methods
    3. Preconstruction Process
    4. Procurement and Project Chronology
    5. Project Control
    6. Quality Control
    7. Risk Assessment
    8. BMI concepts
    9. LEED Point System
    Reference Materials
    Texbook/materials as required by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/08/2019


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  • BLC 294 - Construction Estimating 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Prior knowledge of building construction materials and methods.

     
    Description
    This course will teach basic techniques for estimating utilizing the quantity survey method. Emphasis will be placed on a uniform method of entering the description and dimensions and computing the quantities of materials for the various items of work encountered in general building construction, including excavation, concrete, form work, masonry, carpentry, structural steel and building finishes. Students will estimate quantities from construction drawings, blueprints and details. A discussion of green materials will be introduced in the course. Students will learn to prepare quantity surveys for construction materials that normally fall under the responsibility of a general contractor; electrical and mechanical estimating are beyond the scope of this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the standard estimating procedures in quantity surveys of requiredmaterials for construction projects.
    2. Compile and analyze quantities of elementary work items in construction projects.
    3. Demonstrate the use of shortcut strategies and additional time saving techniques in construction estimating.
    4. Solve estimate quantity equations utilizing a uniform method in unit measurement.
    5. Discuss the costs and quantity of green materials in construction estimating.
    Listed Topics
    1. Materials
    2. Estimating Procedures
    3. Quantity Analysis
    4. Cost-Saving Techniques
    5. Estimating Projects
    6. Going Green
    Reference Materials
    Industry Handouts and Materials, Construction Blueprints.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/31/2017


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  • BLC 295 - Construction Estimating 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BLC 294  

     
    Description
    This is an advanced general construction estimating course designed for the building industry to further prepare students to enter jobs which require skills used in the development of complete construction estimates by the quantity survey method. Emphasis will be placed on pricing of direct labor costs, materials, equipment, subcontractor costs, project overhead, and markup. Each student will prepare cost estimates for construction materials that normally fall under the responsibility of a general contractor; electrical and mechanical estimating are beyond the scope of this course. Students will adjust portions of a national construction cost database by substituting local labor and material costs. A discussion of green materials and LEED Certification will be reviewed in the course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop an estimate from the organizing and planning stages to completion.
    2. Compute the cost of materials, labor, equipment, sub-contracts, taxes, insurance, overhead, markup and contract bonds in the assembly of a complete bid.
    3. Interpret estimate quantities from construction drawings, blueprints and details.
    4. Differentiate between items that influence and contribute to the cost of construction projects.
    5. Recognize the cost differential of utilizing green technologies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cost Estimating
    2. Planning
    3. Labor, Equipment and Material Costs
    4. Subcontracts, Taxes, Insurance
    5. Overhead, Markup, Contract Bonds
    6. Blueprint Analysis
    7. Cost Analysis, Green Technologies
    8. National Database Adjustments
    Reference Materials
    Industry Materials and Handouts, Construction Blueprints.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BLC 296 - Advanced Computer Estimating


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BLC 294  and BLC 295  

     
    Description
    The purpose of this course is to use the estimating skills acquired in Building Construction Estimating 1 and 2 in a hands-on computer environment to increase productivity. The student will prepare estimates for construction items that normally fall under the responsibility of a general contractor; electrical and mechanical estimating are beyond the scope of this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compile a total cost estimate utilizing leading industry software.
    2. Operate software in order to generate estimating reports.
    3. Input data to support and generate estimates.
    4. Adjust estimates to accommodate changes in bidding requirements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Leading Industry Software
    2. Report Calculations
    3. Data Generator
    4. Total Cost Analysis
    Reference Materials
    Industry Handouts and Materials, Construction Blueprints.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search



Business

  
  • BUS 101 - Introduction to Business


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides a foundation in modern business and business practices including principles of management, marketing and human resource management. The operation of business in a free enterprise system, the government’s role in business and forms of business ownership are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the fundamentals of business organizations, their function, role and impact on the economy.
    2. Explain the importance of ethical standards and social responsibility in the business environment.
    3. Discuss the role of the Federal Reserve, monetary and fiscal policy in the managment of the economy.
    4. Describe the opportunities and barriers to international business and the strategies for participating in a global economy.
    5. Compare the major forms of business ownership.
    6. Describe the function of human resource management in an organization.
    7. Differentiate between the various marketing strategies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Business and its role in a global society
    2. Economics
    3. International business
    4. External business environments
    5. Business ethics and social responsibility
    6. Forms of business ownership
    7. Principles of management
    8. Human resource functions
    9. Principles of marketing
    10. Accounting: financial statement basics
    11. The public market
    12. Diversity
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 103 - Principles of Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces the theory and basic principles of management. Students examine the management process including the areas of planning, leading, organizing and controlling.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the fundamental elements involved in the management decision making process.
    2. Explain the role of human resource management.
    3. Apply management principles, ideas and concepts to a business organization using case study analysis.
    4. Analyze the various dimensions of the environment that affect business operations.
    5. Explain the impact of ethics and diversity in the workforce.
    Listed Topics
    1. Ethics and diversity in the workforce
    2. Approaches to management
    3. Communication process
    4. Motivational theories
    5. Decision making process
    6. Group dynamics
    7. Leadership theories
    8. Planning, organizing, leading and controlling
    9. Labor relations
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 104 - Principles of Marketing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This introductory course focuses on the marketing process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, distribution and promotion of products and services that fill various market needs and wants, and support the goals of the individual organization.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate the role of marketing in the economy and organizations.
    2. Describe the relationship of the marketing mix and the target market.
    3. Analyze the impact of various dimensions of business environments on marketing strategies.
    4. Differentiate between valid and invalid marketing research tools for gathering data and information.
    5. Compare and contrast business-to-business marketing and consumer marketing.

     Listed Topics

    1. Fundamental marketing concepts
    2. The marketing mix
    3. Marketing strategies
    4. Marketing planning
    5. Consumer behavior
    6. Marketing research
    7. Business-to-business marketing
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 108 - Principles of Finance


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 104  

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the principles of finance including the concepts of money and interest, forms of business enterprises, capitalization of corporations and financial reports.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define and describe the goals and functions of financial management.
    2. Use financial ratios to evaluate the financial performance of a firm.
    3. Perform financial forecasts given baseline data.
    4. Use recognized analytical methods to evaluate capital projects for investment.
    5. Explain the relationship of securities markets to corporate financial management.
    6. Calculate break-even and describe the impact of operating leverage on the firm.
    7. Create and/or interpret and compare scenarios of financial leverage and the impact on the firm.
    8. Compare and contrast the use of debt and equity in the capital structure of a corporation and the related cost of capital.
    9. Define and describe sources of short-term financing.
    10. Utilize models for managing current assets, such as creating cash flow budgets, calculating the economic ordering quantity (EOQ) for inventory and calculating return on investments in accounts receivable.
    11. Measure relative risk as it relates to portfolio theory of investments.
    12. Describe the factors that affect dividend policy.
    Listed Topics
    1. The goal of maximizing shareholder wealth
    2. Capital markets
    3. Financial analysis
    4. Financial forecasting
    5. Leverage
    6. Time value of money
    7. Valuation of securities
    8. Cost of capital
    9. Capital budgeting
    10. Dividend policy
    11. Risk
    12. Working capital management
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts and library resources.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 110 - Personal Finance


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A course in the management of personal finances. Topics include the budgeting of income and the care and proper use of checking accounts. Attention is given to insurance, various features of U.S. Savings Bonds and other forms of savings, home ownership, securities and the stock market, income taxes, retirement planning, and estates.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List and analyze the elements needed to make a personal financial decision.
    2. Demonstrate competence in making financial decisions through the development of a personal financial plan.
    Listed Topics
    1. Planning for the future.
    2. Developing budgets and financial statements.
    3. Personal income taxes.
    4. Using commercial bank services.
    5. Establishing consumer credit.
    6. The housing decision.
    7. Purchasing consumer durables.
    8. Property and liability insurance.
    9. Health and disability insurance.
    10. Life insurance.
    11. Investment strategy.
    12. Fixed-income securities.
    13. Common stock.
    14. Mutual funds.
    15. Retirement planning.
    16. Estate planning.
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 112 - Entrepreneurship


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides the entrepreneur with a guide through the process of business start-up or enhancement. Following the completion of the course, the student will be able to bring a business to successful launch or will have discovered ways to improve an existing business. The student will learn the fundamentals of networking with other businesses and learn how to use these resources to enhance business opportunities.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create the entrepreneurial assessment report.
    2. Prepare a plan to address major points of the assessment.
    3. Analyze the challenges inherent in the proposed or existing business.
    4. Employ a problem solving approach to remedy obstacles to successful business operation.
    5. Utilize resources appropriate to the development of a successful business.
    6. Develop an ongoing evaluation process to enhance business operations.
    7. Identify funding sources that may be available to support a business owner.
    Listed Topics
    1. Goal development and evaluation
    2. Assessment recommendations
    3. Benchmarks and timelines
    4. Business challenges
    5. Professional networking
    6. Launching a business
    7. Relevant certifications
    8. Organizational growth
    9. Business structures
    10. Recordkeeping
    Reference Materials
    Textbook
    In addition to the required texts, the student will be expected to use Blackboard for assigned articles, video clips and other materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 117 - Public Relations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A survey of the role of public relations in marketing communications. Studied are the relationships of public relations to marketing practices, consumerism, ethics, profitability, social responsibility, government and the law. Channels of communication and other tools of public relations are examined.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Be able to identify and explain strategies used in the public relations field.
    2. Build a foundation to use as a basis for making career decisions.
    3. Utilize research methods with an emphasis on current events and utilize the library facilities and resources.
    4. Recognize the elements of a public relations plan.
    5. Analyze current events and case studies from a public relations perspective.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Public Relations and History.
    2. Public Relations Management, Strategy and Tactics.
    3. Public Opinion Molding.
    4. Ethics in Public Relations.
    5. Research.
    6. Writing Public Relations Communications Both for the Eye and Ear.
    7. Public Relations and Marketing and Advertising.
    8. Publicity Techniques
    9. Utilizing Media
    10. Public Relations Targets; Government. the Community. Consumers, Investors and the International Community
    11. Managing Crises and Opportunity
    12. Public Relations and the Law.
    13. The Relationship Between Top Management and the PR Professional
    14. The Importance of Including Employees in the PR Process
    15. Planning as a Critical Function for PR success
       
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 122 - Business Statistics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A study of statistical methods as they apply to business problems. Areas included are probabilities, binomials, normal distributions and hypothesis testing.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compute and explain the mean, median and mode standard deviation for both grouped and ungrouped data.
    2. Compute and explain probabilities of dependent and independent variables.
    3. Identify and demonstrate knowledge of sampling procedures.
    4. Estimate parameters as they apply to business.
    5. Test hypothesis of means and use results to make decisions from results.
    Listed Topics
    1. Statistical Description (mean, median, mode, standard deviation)
    2. Probability Concepts and Distributions
    3. Sampling
    4. Estimating Parameters
    5. Testing Hypotheses–One and Two Samples

    Optional Topics

    1. Analysis of Variance
    2. Regression
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 130 - Business Communications


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This course develops a student’s skills in writing effective business letters, reports and research projects. Verbal communication skills and the preparation of resumes and other job related materials are studied.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Illustrate a basic understanding of the theory, concepts and principles of business communications.
    2. Apply the principles through written assignments and in-class communications.
    3. Use business communication principles in academic, professional and personal lives.
    4. Present the principles of effective business communications.
    5. Apply the planning process as it pertains to business communications.
    6. Recognize the importance of the editing process in business communications.
    7. List the various types and styles of written communications.
    8. Define the importance of an oral presentation as it relates to meetings, conferences and interviews.
    9. Recognize the importance of listening.
    10. Apply various communication strategies when seeking employment.
    11. Recognize communication differences in a culturally diverse environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Communication foundations
    2. Communication analysis
    3. Communication through voice, electronic and written messages
    4. Communication through reports and business presentations
    5. Communicating about work and jobs
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook and supplementary materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 140 - Introduction to E-Commerce


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This class is designed to provide the student with thorough knowledge of E-Commerce concepts and terminology. It covers E-Commerce applications, methodologies that address business solutions needed for electronic procurement, supplier management and customer relationship management. Real-life examples and case studies are examined to provide the student with working knowledge of these concepts.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of E-Commerce as it pertains to business through various Business and Revenue Models and Business Processes.
    2. Identify the various Business Strategies that can be implemented by creating an effective web presence, through meeting the visitors needs, trust and loyalty and by having a user-friendly interface.
    3. Identify the components that make up the technology infrastructure to implement a web presence.
    4. Identify various marketing strategies such as banners, text ads and direct e-mail.
    5. Explain various Business-to-Business online strategies including software solutions available to implement those strategies such as an Electronic Data Interchange System.
    6. Identify and explain the Legal, Ethical and Tax issues as they pertain to E-Commerce.
    7. Identify the hardware and software needed to implement a web presence such as web servers, operating systems and email systems.
    8. Identify and explain the different web hosting alternatives, different E-Commerce Software for small, medium and large sized companies.
    9. Identify and explain the various security issues and risks associated with E-Commerce and how to implement safeguards to protect the company and its customers.
    10. Explain the various payment systems available for E-Commerce and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    11. Demonstrate how to integrate E-Commerce into the business including if outsourcing should be considered for some services.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Electronic Commerce
    2. Technology Infrastructure
    3. Selling and Marketing on the Web
    4. Business-to-Business Online Strategies
    5. Online Auctions
    6. Legal and Ethical Issues
    7. Web Server and Software
    8. Security Issues and Risks
    9. Payment systems for E-Commerce
    10. E -Commerce Integration
    Reference Materials
    Current Textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts and case studies.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 143 - Internet Marketing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will analyze the various aspects of marketing as they relate to the world of E-Business. The marketing mix and marketing strategies as they pertain to online applications will be explored. The course emphasizes marketing principles, theories and practices, rather than the technical aspects of web development and E-Commerce.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define and apply terminology used in Internet Marketing.
    2. Examine traditional/offline marketing models to determine how they are adapted to an online environment.
    3. Describe the characteristics of Internet users and their implication to marketing.
    4. Compare and contrast online and offline marketing research tools.
    5. Apply marketing segmentation strategies and promotional strategies to the online environment.
    6. Discuss new online opportunities in marketing.
    7. Develop an Internet Marketing Plan.
    Listed Topics
    1. Fundamentals Marketing Principles
    2. Internet User Characteristics
    3. Marketing Research Designs and Applications
    4. Marketing Planning Process
    5. Marketing Planning and the Environment
    6. B2B Marketing
    7. Consumer Marketing
    8. Marketing Strategies
    9. Marketing Mix Analysis
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 151 - Social Theory of Business Ethics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BUS 103  

     
    Description
    This course presents an analysis of the manager as an individual and as a member of the corporate structure. The course includes the following topics: business attitudes, job satisfaction, philosophy of profit, business and social responsibility.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define business ethics contrasted with law.
    2. Describe and utilize a framework for balancing personal values and organizational ethics.
    3. Apply sound decision-making process for handling ethical dilemmas.
    4. Identify criteria for whistle blowing, the risks associated with it and when and how to blow the whistle.
    5. Identify the characteristics of ethical management.
    6. Recommend actions to handle common human resource issues.
    7. Identify components of a system for recognizing and preventing unethical behavior.
    8. Create a role-play an intervention meeting.
    9. Develop creative ways to promote ethical behavior in the workplace.
    10. Identify the common types of ethical issues that arise in various functional areas.
    11. Develop a corporate code of ethics.
    12. Describe the importance of an internal ethics audit.
    Listed Topics
    1. Morality in business
    2. Ethical theories
    3. Privacy in the workplace
    4. Sexual harassment
    5. Safety
    6. Whistleblowing
    7. Intellectual property
    8. Bribes
    9. Advertising and the consumer
    10. Corporate social responsibility
    11. Diversity and affirmative action
    12. Environmental protection
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Case Studies, Films, Exercises, News Media, Supplements.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 200 - Principles of Supervision


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An introduction to the methodology of supervision. Emphasis is placed on building effective work relationships, clarity of communications, dealing with group behavior, handling daily conflicts, and controlling work flow.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define and explain the basic skills of first line supervision of subordinates.
    2. Analyze the supervisor’s role in the major functions of management.
    3. Adequately communicate verbally and in writing with other areas of the firm.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to function effectively in a culturally diverse workplace.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to effect change in subordinate behavior.
    6. Implement total quality management and safe work habits in the workplace.
    7. Exercise an awareness of the importance and magnitude of the inter-relationships between business and business management.
    Listed Topics
    1. Supervision: The Role and the Territory
    2. Planning, Organizing and Goal Setting Values and Ethics
    3. Developing Effective Relationships  
    •     Employee Behavior
    •     Communication Skills
    •     Interpersonal Relationships
    •     Work Groups and Unions
    •     Leadership              

        4. Controlling, Building and Maintaining Performance      

    •     Productivity
    •     Evaluating Performance
    •     Coaching and Developing

        5. Staffing and Human Resource Management Issues

    •     Orientation
    •     Nontraditional Employees, Diversity
    •     Safety and Health Issues
    •     Career Development

                      

     Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.

                       

                      
                       .


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 201 - Human Resource Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A survey of current practices and procedures in human resource management and the study of functions such as recruitment, selection, training, compensation and maintenance of the workforce.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the major Federal laws and executive orders, court decisions and Federal guidelines affecting equal employment opportunity.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic approaches to human resources planning.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the process and the many principles and procedures involved in employee selection.
    4. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different training methods.
    5. Explain how a properly planned and effectively utilized performance appraisal program should contribute to improved employee performance.
    6. Identify the important objectives and policies of an organizations’ compensation program.
    7. State the criteria for a successful incentive plan and how effective financial incentives are in comparison with other forms of motivation.
    8. Recognize the changes occurring in the types and value of benefits employees receive as part of their total compensation.
    9. Recognize the concept of employee rights and employer responsibilities.
    Listed Topics
    1. The Environment of Modern Personnel Administration
    2. Equal Employment Opportunity
    3. Job Analysis and Design
    4. Human Resources Planning
    5. Recruitment of Human Resources
    6. Employee Selection, Practices and Procedures
    7. Orientation, Placement, and Separations
    8. Training and Development
    9. Performance Appraisal
    10. Wages and Salaries
    11. Incentives and Gainsharing
    12. Employer Benefits and Services
    13. Social Security and Worker’s Compensation
    14. OSHA and Physical Security
    15. Union-Management Cooperation and Dispute Resolution
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/25/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 204 - Labor Relations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BUS 101  

     
    Description
    This course is an analysis of collective bargaining as well as the causes and possible solutions to conflict between management and labor. The course includes the following topics: wages, pensions, working conditions, safety and union recognitions, wage and salary administration practices, recruitment, training programs and procedures.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Examine the evolution of U.S. labor relations.
    2. Apply labor terminology in classroom discussions as it relates to current events locally, nationally and internationally.
    3. Analyze the impact of the most significant pieces of labor-related legislation on the work environment.
    4. Assess methods of recruitment and the selection of personnel.
    5. Evaluate actual labor relation cases.
    Listed Topics
    1. The Historical Framework
    2. The Legal Framework
    3. Union Behavior: Structure, Government and Operation
    4. Overview of Collective Bargaining
    5. Grievances and Arbitration
    6. Wage issues under Collective Bargaining
    7. Economic Supplements under Collective Bargaining
    8. Institutional issues under Collective Bargaining
    9. Administrative Issues under Collective Bargaining
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Case Studies, Internet, Exercises, Supplements.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 210 - Principles of Retailing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of retailing from the viewpoint of the owner and manager. The topics include organization of the retail firm, establishment of stores, customer needs, purchasing, pricing, financing, advertising, selling, planning and control.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the market factors which affect retailing.
    2. Identify the basic factors used in determining store location.
    3. Describe the various factors important to store layout and design.
    4. Identify and explain the retail organization structure.
    5. Identify merchandise policies with regard to budgets, planning and selecting item assortments, selecting resources and negotiations.
    6. List the basic types of merchandise information systems.
    7. Describe the various aspects of handling incoming merchandise, such as receiving and checking.
    8. Solve mathematical computations dealing with pricing merchandise.
    9. Identify the different aspects of sales promotion activities and the importance of each to the different types of retail organization.
    10. Identify the types of customer services available to retail stores and where they are applicable.
    11. Review the accounting controls used in retailing (e.g., balance sheet, income statement and expense classification).
    12. Outline the problems faced by retailers with security and loss prevention.
    Listed Topics
    1. Structures of Retailing
    2. Strategic Planning
    3. Retail Customers
    4. Non-store Retailing
    5. Franchising
    6. Legal, Ethical, and Social Responsibility
    7. Financial Consideration
    8. Site Selection
    9. Store Design
    10. Visual Merchandising
    11. Merchandise Mix
    12. Pricing
    13. Promotion
    14. Security
    15. Customer Relations
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Case Studies, Internet, Exercises, Supplements
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 211 - Principles of Advertising


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An introduction to advertising. Emphasis is on the purpose of advertising, the ways firms use advertising and sales promotion as part of their total marketing plans, and the means for determining the need for a complete sales campaign. Topics include market research, media evaluation, ad preparation, and sales promotion.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the role and purpose of advertising in business.
    2. Analyze external factors in an advertising environment.
    3. Develop an advertising campaign.
    4. Compare and contrast various advertising media.
    5. Differentiate advertising from public relations and sales.
    6. List the elements of promotion and the function and role of advertising departments, advertising agencies, or marketing communication firms.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Advertising
    2. Social Responsibility, Ethics, and Regulation
    3. Advertising and Marketing
    4. The Consumer Audience
    5. Account Planning and Research
    6. How Advertising Works
    7. Advertising Planning and Strategy
    8. Media Planning and Buying
    9. Print Media
    10. Broadcast and Interactive Online Media
    11. The Creative Side of Advertising
    12. Copywriting
    13. Design and Production
    14. Direct-Response Marketing
    15. Sales Promotion
    16. Public Relations
    17. Retail and Business to Business
    18. International Advertising
    19. The integrated Campaign
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • BUS 212 - Principles of Selling


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A study of the techniques of salesmanship. Topics include the analysis of customer need, selection of prospects, the sales approach, the sales presentation, overcoming customer objections, closing the sale, and suggestion selling.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the significance of selling activities: to consumers, business firms, salespeople and society in general.
    2. Recognize the principle forms of marketing channels of distribution.
    3. Demonstrate the necessary skills and characteristics that contribute toward greater sales effectiveness.
    4. Cite the principal buying motives of purchases.
    5. Show how company, product and competitor information can facilitate the selling process.
    6. Develop improved communication and listening skills.
    Listed Topics
    1. Selling Today: Developing a Personal Selling Philosophy
    • Personal Selling and the Marketing Concept
    • Career Opportunities in Selling Today

        2. Developing a Relationship Strategy

    • Factors Influencing the Relationship-Building Process
    • Communication Styles: Managing the Relationship Process

        3. Developing a Product Strategy

    • Acquiring Product Information
    • Developing Product-Selling Stretegies

        4. Developing a Customer Strategy

    • Understanding Buyer Behavior
    • Developing a Prospect Base

        5. Developing a Presentation Strategy

    • Preparing for the Sales Presentation
    • Creating the Consultative Presentation
    • Custom Fitting the Sales Demonstratiion

        6. The Professional Salesperson is a Problem Solver

    • The Importance of Time Management to Success
    • The Listening Factor and How It Increases Sales
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
     
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


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  • BUS 221 - Production Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the characteristics and techniques applicable to product or operations management. The emphasis is on decision making in operational areas such as planning and control, cost reduction techniques, inventory control, production engineering, quality control, materials management, value engineering and the use of statistics and quantitative techniques in arriving at sound business decisions.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Provide concepts and techniques in production or operations management.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to efficiently plan, order, and control needed to produce goods and services.
    3. Identify an overall view of the decision-making process as it relates to the major areas of production or operations management.
    4. Develop competency by enhancing strategic awareness in such areas as supply chain management, total quality management, just-in-time systems, inventory management and scheduling.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction and overview of operations management
    2. Operations strategy and competitiveness
    3. Product design and process selection
    4. Total quality management and quality control
    5. Forecasting methods
    6. Capacity planning and facility location
    7. Facility layout
    8. Inventory management and just-in-time tactics
    9. Resource planning
    10. Scheduling
    11. Project management
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet, Exercises, Supplements.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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