Apr 14, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Music Theory & Practice

  
  • MUS 231 - Class Voice 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 230  

     
    Description
    This course builds on the singing skills developed in Class Voice 3. Students further refine their vocal techniques through rehearsal and performance of songs representing various musical styles, including classical, musical theatre, jazz, pop, folk and country. In addition, this course addresses issues pertaining to repertoire selection, and the differences between solo and ensemble singing. Lectures and activities include exercises designed to address vocal techniques specific to particular solo and ensemble settings; student selection of songs; and rehearsals and performances of solo and ensemble repertoire representing various musical genres.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Select vocal repertoire that is appropriate for the individual student.
    2. Recognize the essential attributes of various vocal styles and techniques.
    3. Demonstrate, in solo and ensemble performances, vocal techniques appropriate to various musical styles.
    4. Analyze the similarities and differences between solo and ensemble singing.
    5. Analyze the relationship between text and music in solo and ensemble songs from various musical styles.
    6. Evaluate performances of solo and ensemble songs from various musical styles.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocal style
    2. Solo and ensemble techniques
    3. Repertoire selection
    4. Song interpretation
    5. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 237 - Musicianship Skills 3


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 138  
    Co-requisites: MUS 228  recommended

    Description
    This course builds upon the aural music theory skills developed in Musicianship Skills 2. It includes sight singing and dictation of melodies containing chromatic elements; rhythmic dictation in simple and compound meters; and two-part dictation. The course material covers tonicizations, modulations, sequences, modal mixture and other chromatic chords.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Interpret music in the treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs while sight singing melodies that contain chromatic elements.
    2. Identify musical sequences presented aurally.
    3. Interpret sound patterns presented aurally while dictating melodies that contain chromatic elements.
    4. Interpret sound patterns presented aurally while taking rhythmic and two-part dictation in simple and compound meters.
    5. Evaluate instances when printed notation does not correspond with a given aural example (i.e., error detection).
    Listed Topics
    1. Treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs
    2. Sequences
    3. Modulation
    4. Tonicization
    5. Modal mixture
    6. Chromaticism
    7. Simple and compound meters
    8. Melodic, rhythmic and two-part dictation
    9. Error detection
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 238 - Musicianship Skills 4


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 237  
    Co-requisites: MUS 229  recommended

    Description
    This course builds upon the aural music theory skills developed in Musicianship Skills 3. It includes sight singing and dictation exercises that contain chromatic elements, diatonic modes, non-diatonic scales and more advanced rhythmic techniques such as syncopation, mixed meter and borrowed division of the beat. Aural identification of large scale musical forms is included as well.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Sing diatonic modes.
    2. Sing non-diatonic scales.
    3. Interpret music in the treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs while sight-singing melodies that contain chromatic elements, diatonic modes, non-diatonic scales, syncopation, mixed meter and borrowed division of the beat.
    4. Interpret sound patterns presented aurally while taking rhythmic, melodic, two-part and four-part (harmonic) dictation in simple and compound meters.
    5. Identify the large scale form of music presented aurally.
    Listed Topics
    1. 18th and 19th-century musical forms
    2. 20th and 21st-century techniques
    3. Motivic manipulation
    4. Phrase rhythm
    5. Diatonic modes
    6. Non-diatonic scales
    7. Syncopation
    8. Mixed meters
    9. Melodic, rhythmic, two-part and four-part (harmonic) dictation
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 253 - History of Jazz


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This class surveys Jazz from its inception until present day. Topics include composers, performance practice and instrumental technique. Lectures synthesize jazz history with American culture through source study, analytical listening and research.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recite the narrative of Jazz’s development.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of a specific facet of Jazz history through writing and research.
    3. Appraise a Jazz performance through writing.
    4. Identify important composers and tunes by name through listening.
    5. Summarize the important developments in the evolution of Jazz improvisation.
    Listed Topics
    1. The roots of jazz
    2. Improvisation
    3. The swing era
    4. Modern jazz
    5. The avant-garde
    Reference Materials
    Textbook: department selected text
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


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  • MUS 270 - Electronic and Computer Music


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 119  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the principles and techniques developed in MUS 119 , Introduction to Music Technology. It covers advanced music production skills involving sequencing, editing, signal processing, mixing and sampling. Instruction is combined with practical application on a digital audio workstation.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the various components of computer-based music production.
    2. Summarize the development of computer-based music and its impact on the music industry.
    3. Experiment with advanced electronic music production techniques.
    4. Create computer-based music recordings.
    5. Evaluate electronic music compositions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sequencing
    2. Editing
    3. Signal processing
    4. Mixing
    5. Synthesizers
    6. Virtual instruments
    7. Sampling
    8. Computer-based music
    Reference Materials
    textbook, internet, digital audio workstation, music sequencing and editing software.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • MUS 271 - Music and Audio in Media


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 119  

     
    Description
    This course provides an overview of the various components of current multimedia production.  It covers editing, importing, embedding and synchronizing audio and video to create integrated multimedia products.  Instruction is combined with practical application on a digital audio workstation.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the various components of multimedia integration.
    2. Summarize the development of music videos and their impact on the music industry.
    3. Experiment with digital image and sound editing.
    4. Create multimedia recordings.
    5. Evaluate multimedia products.
    Listed Topics
    1. Digital sound editing
    2. Digital image editing
    3. Importing and embedding
    4. Synchronization
    5. Multimedia integration
    Reference Materials
    textbook, internet, digital audio workstation, music sequencing and editing software
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • MUS 272 - Live Sound Reinforcement


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview of the equipment and techniques used in live concert sound reinforcement.  It covers the operation and inter-connectivity of individual sound system components, including microphones, consoles, amplifiers, speakers and monitors.  Instruction is combined with practical application in a variety of live sound scenarios.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the interconnectivity of the various components of a live sound reinforcement system.
    2. Summarize the practical and acoustical considerations involved in live sound reinforcement.
    3. Demonstrate proper selection and placement of microphones, amplifliers, speakers and monitors in a variety of live concert scenarios.
    4. Demonstrate proper selection of cabling for various sound reinforcement projects.
    5. Experiment with signal processing and mixing techniques in a variety of live concert scenarios.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sound system set up
    2. Microphone techniques
    3. Signal flow
    4. Signal processing
    5. Mixing
    Reference Materials
    textbook, digital audio workstation, music technology software.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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Nuclear Medicine Technology

  
  • NMT 101 - Introduction to Nuclear Medicine Technology


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the NMT program.

     
    Description
    This course presents the fundamentals of radiopharmaceuticals and generators, an introduction to nuclear physics and types of decay, and an overview of patient care in nuclear medicine technology. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Differentiate between the types of radioactive decay.
    2. Describe the generator elution process including molybdenum and alumina ion breakthrough.
    3. Explain the bioroute of pertechnetate and other radiopharmaceuticals including method of localization, route of excretion and organ receiving highest radiation dose.
    4. Identify how radiopharmaceuticals are produced and quality control procedures.
    5. Interpret relevant patient data by using critical thinking and problem solving skills.
    6. Identify ethical principles and cultural diversity in a patient care setting.


     Listed Topics

    1. Radioactivity and decay
    2. Nuclear physics
    3. Generators
    4. Radiopharmaceuticals
    5. Methods of localization
    6. Radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality control
    7. Patient care
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, handouts and PowerPoint presentations.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • NMT 102 - Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161  and NMT 101  
    Co-requisites: BIO 162  

    Description
    This is a two-semester course designed to follow didactic approach to clinical nuclear medicine technology. A considerable number of class hours are allotted to the review of concepts in anatomy, physiology, pathology, and radiopharmaceuticals as they relate to the clinical procedures essential in performing Nuclear Medicine examinations. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain and outline normal and abnormal patterns of radiopharmaceutical distribution for each procedure.
    2. Locate and formulate specified data in sample patient charts with sample examination data.
    3. List the organs related to each procedure.
    4. Explain the anatomy and physiology related to each imaging procedure.
    5. List and comprehend the advantages and disadvantages for each procedure as it relates to the patient’s pathology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cardiovascular procedures
    2. Endocrine procedures
    3. Skeletal procedures
    4. Pulmonary procedures
    Reference Materials
    Current textbooks, workbooks, Internet sites and current computer software.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • NMT 150 - Applied Nuclear Medicine Technology 1


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the NMT Program.

     
    Description
     This course addresses the types of radiation and their effects on the human body.  Students study the amounts of radiation from various sources and learn radiation safety procedures. Radiopharmaceuticals and quality control procedures are introduced along with patient care. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the bioroute of pertechnetate and other radiopharmaceuticals including route of excretion and organ receiving highest radiation dose.
    2. Differentiate between the types of radioactive decay, radiation units and the biological effects of radiation.
    3. Practice As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principles by learning how to limit radiation exposure to the patient, public, fellow workers and self.
    4. Apply the rules of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations to the receipt and disposal of radioactive materials.
    5. Perform moly breakthrough, kit preparation and radiochromatography in the lab setting.
    6. Perform radioactive dilution and decay calculations using various formulas.
    7. Interpret relevant patient data by using critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
    8. Identify ethical principles and cultural diversity in a patient care setting.
    Listed Topics
    1. Radioactivity
    2. Radiation units
    3. Biological effects of radiation
    4. Sources of radiation
    5. Radiation protection guidelines
    6. Radiation shielding and monitoring
    7. Radiopharmaceuticals, preparation and radiochromatography
    8. Nuclear medicine math
    9. Patient care
    Reference Materials
    Current applicable textbooks, handouts, and PowerPoint presentations.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • NMT 151 - Applied Nuclear Medicine Technology 2


    Credits: 5
    5 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162  and CHM 151  

     
    Description
    This course follows a didactic approach to clinical nuclear medicine technology.  A considerable number of class hours are allotted to the review of concepts in anatomy, physiology, pathology and radiopharmaceuticals as they relate to the clinical procedures outlined in the main topics. This course provides the student with practical knowledge essential to the acquisition of skills in performing nuclear medicine examinations. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Obtain pertinent patient history information as needed for the nuclear medicine procedure.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to explain the nuclear medicine procedure to a patient.
    3. Evaluate patient medical history in preparation for the nuclear medicine procedure to identify any contraindications prior to the procedure.
    4. Identify the radiopharmaceutical, dose and route of administration and acquistion parameters for a diagnostic nuclear medicine procedure.
    5. Differentiate between normal and abnormal patterns of radiopharmaceutical distribution by analyzing films of nuclear medicine procedures.
    6. Quantify radiopharmaceutical distribution through computer analysis and mathematical calculations.

     Listed Topics

    1. Skeletal imaging
    2. Gastrointestinal imaging
    3. Cardiovascular imaging
    4. Pulmonary imaging
    5. Genitourinary imaging
    6. Central nervous system imaging
    7. Infection imaging
    8. Thyroid/Endocrine imaging
    9. Therapy procedures
    10. Miscellaneous procedures
    Reference Materials
    Current applicable textbooks, handouts, case studies and internet access.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • NMT 160C - Introduction to Applied Nuclear Medicine Practicum


    Credits: 2
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program.

     
    Description
    This course is conducted in a clinical facility where, under direct supervision, the student gains training and experience in patient care, radiation safety, radiopharmaceutical administration, performing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and operating nuclear medicine technology equipment.  The course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.  Students are charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate patient history and preparation as needed for the nuclear medicine procedure.
    2. Explain the procedure to the patient.
    3. Compute dosage and radiopharmaceutical required for the procedures.
    4. Obtain venous access as necessary to adminster radiopharmaceutical.
    5. Determine appropriate acquisition parameters and nuclear medicine equipment for the patient procedure.
    6. Utilize proper body mechanics in assisting patients.
    7. Demonstrate good radiation safety techniques and proper disposal of radioactive waste.
    8. Acquire nuclear medicine images to include correct annotation and processing.
    9. Analyze processed data critically to determine the need for additional images.
    10. Perform quality control procedures including analysis of results.
    11. Interact with other healthcare members to provide quality patient care with respect for diversity.
    12. Participate in or simulate therapy procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient care
    2. Radiopharmaceuticals:  dosage, administration and disposal
    3. Equipment and acquisition parameters
    4. Diagnostic imaging procedures
    5. Processing and archiving to Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS)
    6. Therapy procedures
    7. Radiation safety techniques
    8. Daily quality control on equipment
    9. Surveys and wipe tests

    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • NMT 161C - Applied Nuclear Medicine Practicum


    Credits: 3
    360 Clinical Hours

    Description
    A Practical experience with the fundamental techniques of nuclear medicine technology. The second clinical practicum provides more experience in the ongoing activities of a nuclear medical facility. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Assist with radiopharmaceutical administration for various scan procedures.
    2. Perform supervised positioning of patients for various scan procedures.
    3. Perform supervised calculation and setting of instrument and computer parameters.
    4. Assist with discharge of patient from department.
    Listed Topics
    1. Performing Assisted Scan Procedures:
    • Pulmonary
    • Cardiovascular
    • Hematological
    • Renal
    • Endocrine
    • Skeletal
    • Pulmonary
    Reference Materials
    Principles and Practices of Nuclear Medicine. Second Edition
    Early and Sodee, C. V. Mosby Company, 1995.


    Nuclear Medicine. The Requisites. First Edition
    Thrall & Ziessman, C. V. Mosby Company, 1995.


    Approved By: Kraft, John Date Approved: 08/26/1987


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  • NMT 201 - Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology 2


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161 , BIO 162 , NMT 102  

     
    Description
    This course is the second of a two-semester course designed to follow a didactic approach to clinical nuclear medicine technology and also to provide the student with practical knowledge essential to the acquisition of skills in performing nuclear medicine examinations. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain and outline normal and abnormal patterns of radiopharmaceutical distribution.
    2. Locate and formulate specified data in sample patient charts with sample examination data.
    3. List the organs related to each procedure.
    4. Explain the anatomy and physiology related to each imaging procedure.
    5. List and comprehend the advantages and disadvantages for each procedure as it relates to the patient’s pathology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Gastrointestinal system procedures.
    2. Urinary system procedures
    3. Central nervous system procedures
    4. Tumors and inflammatory diseases procedures
    Reference Materials
    Current textbooks, workbooks, Internet sites and current computer software.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 10/26/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • NMT 202C - Nuclear Medicine Clinical Practicum 1


    Credits: 3
    360 Clinical Hours

    Description
    An introduction to the clinical aspects of nuclear medicine technology. The student learns the procedures and instrumentation of a nuclear medicine facility. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss all administrative and nursing procedures.
    2. Discuss activities for performing ventilation examinations, blood pool examinations, dynamic cardiopulmonary examinations and cardiac examinations.
    3. Discuss activities for performing liver function examinations (Hepatobiliary studies) and pancreas examinations.
    4. Discuss activities for performing kidney function studies (renograms) and renal flow studies.
    5. Discuss activities for performing salivary gland scan examinations.
    6. Discuss activities for performing cisternogram examinations and dynamic brain studies.
    7. Discuss activities for performing soft tissue tumor localization examinations and bone marrow examinations.
    8. Discuss body composition examinations and all therapeutic procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Administrative Procedures
    2. Nursing Procedures
    3. Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Examinations
    4. Gastrointestinal Examinations
    5. Renal Examinations
    6. Hematological Examinations
    7. Endocrine/Exocrine Examinations
    8. Neurological Examinations
    9. Skeletal and Soft Tissue Examinations
    10. Therapeutic Procedures
    Reference Materials
    .
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/13/1997


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  • NMT 203 - Nuclear Medicine Laboratory Procedures


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: NMT 102  and NMT 201  
    Co-requisites: NMT 151  

    Description
    This course follows a didactic approach to clinical nuclear medicine technology.  A review of concepts in anatomy, physiology, pathology, and radiopharmaceuticals are covered as they relate to the clinical and therapeutic procedures outlined in the main topics.  This course provides the student with practical knowledge essential to the acquisition of skills in performing nuclear medicine diagnostic examinations and therapeutic procedures. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Obtain pertinent patient history information as needed for the nuclear medicine procedure.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to explain the nuclear medicine procedure to a patient.
    3. Evaluate patient medical history in preparation for the nuclear medicine procedure to identify any contraindications prior to the procedure.
    4. Identify the radiopharmaceutical, dose and route of administration, and acquisition parameters for a diagnostic nuclear medicine procedure.
    5. Differentiate between normal and abnormal patterns of radiopharmaceutical distribution by analyzing films of nuclear medicine procedures.
    6. Quantify radiopharmaceutical distribution through computer analysis and mathematical calculations.
    7. Characterize the various radiotherapies and the pathologies that can be treated.
    8. Determine the required pre and post-therapy procedures to include patient preparation, informed consent, patient instructions, radiation safety/monitoring and documentation.
    9. Document patient identity, radiopharmaceutical, route of administration and dosage for radionuclide therapies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Parathyroid imaging
    2. Adrenal imaging
    3. Breast imaging
    4. Monoclonal antibody imaging
    5. Lymphoscintigraphy/sentinel node localization
    6. Neuroendocrine tumor imaging
    7. Radionuclide therapies
    Reference Materials
    Current textbooks, handouts, case studies and internet sites.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • NMT 204C - Nuclear Medicine Clinical Practicum 2


    Credits: 4
    480 Clinical Hours

    Description
    During this practicum, the student spends more time in the hospital nuclear medicine unit. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss all administrative and nursing procedures.
    2. Discuss activities for performing ventilation examinations, blood pool examinations, dynamic cardiopulmonary examinations and cardiac examinations.
    3. Discuss activities for performing liver function examinations (Hepatobiliary studies) and pancreas examinations.
    4. Discuss activities for performing kidney function studies (renograms) and renal flow studies.
    5. Discuss activities for performing salivary gland scan examinations.
    6. Discuss activities for performing cisternogram examinations and dynamic brain studies.
    7. Discuss activities for performing soft tissue tumor localization examinations and bone marrow examinations.
    8. Discuss body composition examinations and all therapeutic procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Administrative Procedures
    2. Nursing Procedures
    3. Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Exalminations
    4. Gastrointestinal Examinations
    5. Renal Examinations
    6. Hematological Examinations
    7. Endocrine/Exocrine Examinations
    8. Neurological Examinations
    9. Skeletal and Soft Tissue Examinations
    10. Therapeutic Procedures
    Reference Materials
    None
    Approved By: Kraft, John Date Approved: 01/17/1983


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  • NMT 205C - Nuclear Medicine Externship


    Credits: 5
    400 Clinical Hours

    Description
    The student performs nuclear medicine examinations while increasing skills and self-confidence. The student works full-time in the nuclear medicine facility. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss all administrative and nursing procedures.
    2. Discuss activities for performing ventilation examinations, blood pool examinations, dynamic cardiopulmonary examinations and cardiac examinations.
    3. Discuss activities for performing liver function examinations (Hepatobiliary studies) and pancreas examinations.
    4. Discuss activities for performing kidney function studies (renograms) and renal flow studies.
    5. Discuss activities for performing salivary gland scan examinations.
    6. Discuss activities for performing cisternogram examinations and dynamic brain studies.
    7. Discuss activities for performing soft tissue tumor localization examinations and bone marrow examinations.
    8. Discuss body composition examinations and all therapeutic procedures.

     Listed Topics

    1. Administrative Procedures
    2. Nursing Procedures
    3. Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Examinations
    4. Gastrointestinal Examinations
    5. Renal Examinations
    6. Hematological Examinations
    7. Endocrine/Exocrine Examinations
    8. Neurological Examinations
    9. Skeletal and Soft Tissue Examinations
    10. Therapeutic Procedures
    Reference Materials
    None
    Approved By: Kraft, John Date Approved: 01/17/1983


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  • NMT 206 - Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course that develops greater skills in operating, calibrating, and performing routine maintenance quality control on gamma cameras, well counters, gas-filled detectors, and PET cameras. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the construction and operating principles of gas-filled detectors.
    2. Describe and diagram the operation of scintillation imaging systems.
    3. Explain and list all of the quality control procedures required for scintillation and gas detectors.
    4. Explain the operation of PET imaging systems.
    5. List the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standards and their applications to nuclear medicine.
    Listed Topics
    1. Gas-filled detectors
    2. Scintillation detectors
    3. Collimators
    4. Spatial resolution and sensitivity
    5. Equipment quality control
    Reference Materials
    Current textbooks, workbooks, Internet sites and current computer software.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • NMT 207 - Nuclear Medicine Seminar


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course presents current literature and trends in nuclear medicine methods and equipment. The course includes guest lecturers, field trips and student presentations on selected topics. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Search literature on selected topics.
    2. Compose topic outlines on selected topics.
    3. Develop various strategies for AV presentations.
    4. Examine (through field trips) various nuclear medicine facilities.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various guest lecturers such as physicians, radiation health physicists and nuclear medicine physicians
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio visual aids (PowerPoint), Internet charts, videos and journals.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • NMT 270 - Fundamentals of Molecular Imaging With PET


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will introduce the student to Positron Emission Tomography Imaging. This modality produces high energy, 3-D computer-reconstructed images measuring and determining the function or physiology in a specific organ, tumor or other metabolically active site. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Achieve competence in PET image interpretation.
    2. Assess clinical indications and diagnostic accuracy of PET with emphasis on HCFA-approved indications.
    3. Assess specific PET acquisition protocols for oncology, cardiac and brain imaging.
    4. Review patient preparation for specific clinical applications e.g., dietary preparation, issues related to diabetic patients.
    5. Assess patient throughout including details of dose administration, tracer uptake period and patient positioning on the scanner.
    6. Obtain working knowledge of basic physics related to PET data acquisition and image reconstruction.
    7. Assess cyclotron production of commonly used PET radiopharmaceuticals (FDG, N-13 Ammonia, F18-L-DOPA).
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient preparation and PET acquisition protocols
    2. Introduction of PET image interpretation
    3. PET Oncology: Indications and Diagnostic Accuracy
    4. PET Neurology: Indications and Diagnostic Accuracy
    5. PET Cardiology: Indications and Diagnostic Accuracy
    6. Basic physics of PET data acquisition and image reconstruction
    7. Cyclotron production of commonly used tracers
    Reference Materials
    Current textbooks, workbooks, Internet sites and current computer software.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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Nursing

  
  • NSG 104 - Drug Calculations


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides the nursing student with the information necessary to correctly interpret medication orders and medication labels and to correctly solve drug calculations using the dimensional analysis method. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to correctly interpret medication orders and read medication labels.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to correctly solve drug calculations problems using the dimensional analysis method.
    3. Successfully pass the final examination.
    Listed Topics
    1. Drug Calculation Using Dimensional analysis
    Reference Materials
    A textbook will be required.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/17/1996


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  • NUR 110 - Foundation and Health Promotion Concepts for Nursing Practice


    Credits: 6
    2.5 Lecture Hours 2.5 Lab Hours 120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing program
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully): NUR 120 , BIO 161 , PSY 101 , MAT 106  or MAT 108  

    Description
    This foundational course introduces the concept-based curriculum that builds upon safe and effective care, health promotion and maintenance and psychosocial and physiological integrity. The course includes didactic instruction as well as simulated laboratory and clinical experiences. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Integrate basic clinical judgment in the safe and effective delivery of patient care.
    2. Exhibit the art and practice of caring for diverse populations as a means to promote health.
    3. Demonstrate fundamental therapeutic communication when providing care for adult patients.
    4. Identify foundational principles of teaching and learning.
    5. Discuss the role and responsibility of the professional nurse.
    Listed Topics
    1. Clinical decision making
    2. Caring concepts including safety and comfort
    3. Role of the nurse
    4. Communication
    5. Teaching and learning principles
    Reference Materials
    Fundamentals of nursing textbooks, online learning resources, hospital-based technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/30/2013


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  • NUR 120 - Health Assessment Concepts for Nursing Practice


    Credits: 2
    1 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully):NUR 110 , BIO 161 , PSY 101 , MAT 106  or MAT 108  

    Description
    This course emphasizes holistic assessment of an adult including head-to-toe assessment skills, interviewing techniques and diagnostic data analysis through didactic instruction and simulated lab experience. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Articulate clinical judgment as it relates to normal and abnormal physical assessment findings.
    2. Demonstrate caring with respect for cultural attitudes and beliefs related to health promotion and assessment.
    3. Demonstrate therapeutic communication during the interview and physical assessment process.
    4. Identify learning needs of patients and assess readiness to learn with respect to cultural attitudes and beliefs related to health promotion.
    5. Articulate rationale for utilization of evidence-based practice.
    Listed Topics
    1. Physiological, psychosocial and cultural assessment
    2. Interviewing techniques
    3. Health promotion/illness prevention
    4. Diagnostic findings
    Reference Materials
    Nursing physical assessment, online learning resources, simulation technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/30/2013


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  • NUR 130 - Basic Health Concepts Nursing Practice


    Credits: 6
    2.5 Lecture Hours 2.5 Lab Hours 120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 110 , NUR 120 , BIO 161 , PSY 101 , MAT 106  or MAT 108  
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully): Take PSY 108 , ENG 101  and BIO 162  

    Description
    This course is designed to build upon the foundational spheres of the individual, healthcare delivery systems and nursing. The emphasis is on caring for the older adult client during health and illness through didactic, simulated laboratory and clinical experiences. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply clinical decision making in caring for adult/older adult with health alterations.
    2. Demonstrate cultural caring for the adult and older adult population.
    3. Apply therapeutic communication techniques in caring for the adult and older adult population.
    4. Differentiate the learning needs of adult from older adult patients.
    5. Demonstrate integrity and ethical practice when providing care to diverse patients.
    Listed Topics
    1. Nursing care of the adult and older adult
    2. Evidence-based practice
    3. Information technology
    4. Ethical practice related to end-of-life care
    Reference Materials
    Medical-Surgical textbook, online learning resources, simulation technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


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  • NUR 140 - Evidence Based Nursing Drug Therapy


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 110 , NUR 120 , BIO 161 , PSY 101 , MAT 106  or MAT 108  
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully): PSY 108 , ENG 101  and BIO 162  

    Description
    This didactic course covers the nurse’s role in safe medication drug administration. It utilizes an evidence based approach to patient teaching, assessment of adverse effects, evaluation of medication effectiveness and avoidance of medication errors. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the role of clinical judgment in the safe and effective administration of medications.
    2. Explain caring behaviors related to medication administration and complementary therapies.
    3. Analyze appropriate communication techniques for use in medication administration and complementary therapies.
    4. Choose appropriate media in the development of a medication teaching plan.
    5. Articulate the role of the nurse in safe medication administration including electronic and written documentation utilizing evidence-based practice.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safe and effective medication administration
    2. Electronic and written documentation
    3. Patient teaching
    4. Minimizing errors
    5. Nutritional therapy
    6. Prescription, over-the-counter and herbal interactions
    Reference Materials
    Nursing Pharmacology textbook, online learning resources, hospital documentation and informatics.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


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  • NUR 210 - Professional Nursing Issues


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 130  and NUR 140  
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully): NUR 220 , NUR 230  and ENG 102  

    Description
    This didactic course explores concepts of professional behaviors and issues that impact nursing in the current and future health care delivery system. The emphasis is on group learning through discussion of legal and ethical issues, professional responsibilities and accountability and evidence based practice research. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain how professional behaviors, quality improvement processes and legal/ethical issues impact clinical judgment.
    2. Discuss the legal and ethical issues that impact professional caring behaviors.
    3. Examine legal and ethical aspects of communication and how they impact the delivery of safe and effective care.
    4. Implement teaching plans that include legal and ethical concepts of patient care.
    5. Examine ethical inquiry practice as it relates to professional identity.
    Listed Topics
    1. Professional nursing organizations
    2. Utilization of nursing research/evidence-based practice
    3. Legal issues
    4. Ethical issues
    Reference Materials
    Nursing issues textbook and online learning resources.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


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  • NUR 220 - Adult Health Concepts for Nursing Practice


    Credits: 4
    1.75 Lecture Hours 1.5 Lab Hours 90 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 130 , NUR 140 , BIO 162 , BIO 175  and PSY 108  
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully) ENG 102  

    Description
    This course is comprised of two major components. The first component addresses the psychosocial concepts of patients experiencing stressful events and acute and chronic illness. The second component addresses care of patients with cancer and other cellular alterations. Both components include, didactic, simulation laboratory and clinical experiences. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply clinical decision making to care of adult patients with acute/chronic stressors.
    2. Utilize evidence based practice in the care of adult patients with acute/chronic stressors.
    3. Apply therapeutic communication techniques in the care of adult patients with acute/chronic stressors.
    4. Develop teaching plans that address risk factors and health promotion in defined populations.
    5. Develop the role of nurse advocate in the care of adult patients with acute/chronic stressors.
    Listed Topics
    1. Nursing care of patients with cancer
    2. Nursing care of patients with mental health problems
    3. Nursing care of patients with select medical-surgical problems
    4. Teaching plan to promote health
    Reference Materials
    Medical-Surgical textbook, online learning resources and simulation technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/30/2013


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  • NUR 230 - Family Health Concepts for Nursing Practice


    Credits: 4
    2.5 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours 60 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 130 , NUR 140 , BIO 162 , BIO 175 , PSY 108  
    Co-requisites: (If not previously completed successfully): ENG 102  

    Description
    This course covers care practices for women, infants, children and adolescents. The course explores the expanding family during health and illness through didactic, simulated laboratory and clinical experiences. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Utilize clinical judgment for women, infants, children and families.
    2. Integrate caring practices for women, infants, children and families.
    3. Apply therapeutic communication techniques appropriate and specific for interactions with women, infants, children and families.
    4. Develop teaching plans for individuals and families.
    5. Demonstrate advocacy while providing care for women, infants, children and families.
    Listed Topics
    1. Nursing care of infants, children and adolescents
    2. Women’s health problems
    3. Nursing care of child-bearing women
    4. Nursing care of families
    Reference Materials
    Pediatrics and Maternal Child textbooks, online learning resources and simulation technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/30/2013


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  • NUR 240 - Complex Health Concepts for Nursing Practice


    Credits: 7
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours 160 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 210 , NUR 220 , NUR 230  
    Co-requisites: Take 3 credits Humanities (if not previously completed sucessfully)

    Description
    This course focuses on caring for adults with complex, acute and chronic health problems through didactic instruction, simulated laboratory and clinical experiences. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze clinical judgment in the nursing care of patients with acute and chronic health alterations.
    2. Create a caring environment that respects the culture of patients with acute and chronic health alterations.
    3. Integrate therapeutic communication techniques with patients, families and interdisciplinary team members.
    4. Integrate healthcare teaching in the delivery of nursing care for patients with acute and chronic health alterations.
    5. Analyze the use of evidence-based practice and ethical behavior in providing care for patients with acute and chronic health alterations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Critical care skills including laboratory and diagnostic testing analysis, monitoring with invasive and non-invasive technology
    2. Nursing care of patients with acute cardiac, renal, neurological and endocrine problems.
    3. Communication
    4. Patient education
    Reference Materials
    Critical Care textbook, Medical-Surgical textbook, online learning resources and simulation technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


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  • NUR 250 - Leadership and Management Concepts


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: NUR 240  

     
    Description
    This capstone course is designed to integrate previous concepts through an in-depth clinical experience. The emphasis is placed on the transition from the student role to that of the professional nurse. The focus is on coordination and supervision of patient care utilizing leadership and management concepts. Clinical assignment during this course requires students to be flexible based on the mentors work schedule. This course includes an NCLEX review that requires an additional fee. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Integrate clinical judgment to facilitate transformation of knowledge, skills and values in a variety of healthcare delivery systems.
    2. Integrate caring and knowledge of cultural diversity when providing care to patients at various points across the lifespan.
    3. Critique the effectiveness of communication with the interdisciplinary healthcare team utilizing principles of management and delegation.
    4. Prioritize teaching and learning needs of patients and families in culturally diverse settings across the lifespan.
    5. Implement the role of the professional nurse when caring for patients and families in diverse healthcare delivery systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Management techniques
    2. Care of multiple patients in an acute setting
    3. Clinical decision making and prioritization
    4. Delegation
    5. Situation Background Assessment Recommendation (SBAR)
    Reference Materials
    Leadership and Management textbook, Medical-Surgical textbook, online learning resources and simulation technology.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


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Occupational Therapy Assistant

  
  • OTA 101 - Introduction to Occupational Therapy


    Credits: 5
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into OTA Program

     
    Description
    This is an introduction to occupational therapy and the role of the occupational therapy assistant in health care. Topics include history and philosophy, theories of practice, definition of the profession, disability groups treated, treatment settings, terminology used and modalities employed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define occupational therapy, related philosophies, theories, ethics, functions and goals.
    2. Explain the concept of service delivery and the implications for Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants (COTAs) in various practice settings.
    3. Identify the roles of occupational therapy practitioners, their credentialing, educational and supervisory requirements.
    4. Explain the Occupational Therapy (OT) process, clinical reasoning, therapeutic use of self, and OT Domain and Framework in OT service delivery.
    5. Describe the moral and ethical importance of maintaining confidentiality in all patient/client situations.
    6. Complete a 24-hour volunteer work experience, including the required volunteer work assignments.
    7. Explain the importance of utilizing proper universal standards and material safety within health care environments.
    8. Perform the basic techniques and procedures for selected lab activities in a satisfactory and safe manner.
    9. Identify significant individuals and events that aided in the development of the OT profession.
    10. Discuss the importance of cultural competency in various occupational therapy practice settings.
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical abbreviations
    2. Medical terminology
    3. Portfolio
    4. Vital signs
    5. Occupational profile
    6. Treatment team
    7. Confidentiality
    8. Americans with Disabilities Act
    9. Wheelchair safety
    10. Ethics (OT and CCAC/ALH)
    11. Various lab projects
    12. Activity analysis
    13. OT history
    14. OT supervision
    15. Cultural diversity
    16. Documentation
    17. American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT) article critique
    18. Professionalism
    19. Therapeutic use of self
    20. Therapeutic games  
    21. Learning styles
    22. Frames of reference
    23. OT roles and credentialing
    24. Interview techniques
    25. Professional development
    26. Scientific-based decisions
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Dr Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • OTA 102 - Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics


    Credits: 5
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , BIO 161  
    Co-requisites: OTA 112C  and BIO 162  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to pediatric pathological and behavioral conditions which inhibit normal development. Emphasis is on current diagnostic and treatment methods used in clinical situations and the role that occupational therapy plays in this process. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the role of occupational therapy in pediatrics, including service delivery models and work settings.
    2. Describe the processes of normal development in the areas of physical, cognitive, perceptual, psychosocial, and sensory integrative functioning.
    3. Describe selected pediatric diagnoses commonly referred to occupational therapy.
    4. Explain evaluation and treatment techniques commonly utilized in an occupational therapy pediatric setting.
    5. Adapt selected life tasks and activities for patients with developmental disabilities.
    6. Describe the supervisory guidelines between the occupational therapy assistant and the occupational therapist in various pediatric settings.
    7. Analyze an activity, gradation and adaptation for each activity component.
    8. List the components of play and the implications for health and occupational therapy intervention.
    9. Discuss multicultural factors and the role of the family in treatment of pediatric conditions.
    10. Utilize safety precautions and maintenance of tools, equipment and supplies.
    11. Synthesize occupational therapy documentation reflective of interventions in pediatric practice.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pediatric practice settings
    2. Normal development
    3. Diversity factors
    4. Pediatric conditions
    5. Pediatric evaluations
    6. Treatment approaches
    7. Assistive technology
    8. Activity analysis
    9. Adaptive equipment
    10. Scientific-based research
    11. Treatment activities
    12. Documentation
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • OTA 112C - Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 1 Pediatrics


    Credits: 1
    48 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 101  
    Co-requisites: OTA 102  

    Description
    This course provides students with experience through directed observation and participation in pediatric settings. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Display a professional appearance that does not interfere with patient/client relationship.
    2. Employ effective time management skills.
    3. Demonstrate professional oral and written communication skills.
    4. Display appropriate therapeutic interactions and involvement in the healthcare environment.
    5. Exercise dependability by successfully completing all Fieldwork related assignments.
    6. Show initiative in an appropriate and professional manner.
    7. Demonstrate responsibility for learning throughout the Fieldwork experience.
    8. Display an openness and willingness in response to supervision for professional development.
    9. Demonstrate safety in all aspects of the Fieldwork experience.
    10. Employ environmental maintenance consistently throughout the Fieldwork experience.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various clinical topics will be addressed and applied during this eight (8) week assignment. Topics may vary due to the patients/clients seen at each specific location as well as Occupational Therapy treatment programming offered.
    Reference Materials
    No specific texts are required for fieldwork experiences. However, there may be assignments and readings from texts used in the corresponding lecture/lab course(s), previous courses and other professional publications.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • OTA 201 - Occupational Therapy in Physical Disabilities


    Credits: 5
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , OTA 102 , PSY 108  
    Co-requisites: OTA 211C  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the etiology, diagnoses, clinical conditions and methods of treatment used with people who have a physical disability. Emphasis is on methods of evaluation and treatment used in occupational therapy and assisting the physically impaired to participate as fully as possible within their own environment. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the etiology and symptoms of physical dysfunction commonly referred to occupational therapy within the various treatment settings.
    2. Explain evaluation and treatment techniques commonly utilized with physically impaired clients.
    3. Apply the principles of compensation for occupational skills.
    4. Adapt selected life tasks and activities to specific physical disabilities.
    5. Examine the impact of physical dysfunction to the individual, the family and society.
    6. Describe the supervisory guidelines between the occupational therapy assistant and occupational therapist in a physical disabilities setting.
    7. Fabricate selected orthotic devices.
    8. Describe architectural barriers and modifications for accessibility.
    9. Demonstrate effective documentation for occupational therapy services.
    10. Employ safety precautions and proper maintenance of tools, equipment and supplies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Evaluation Methods
    2. Treatment Planning
    3. Documentation
    4. Orthopedic Conditions
    5. Amputations
    6. Spinal Cord Injury
    7. Hand Rehabilitation
    8. Arthritis
    9. Cerebral Vascular Accident
    10. Head Trauma
    11. Degenerative Diseases
    12. Burns
    13. Wheelchairs
    14. Transfers
    15. Splinting
    16. Architectural Barriers
    17. Activities of Daily Living
    18. Adaptive Equipment
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • OTA 202 - Occupational Therapy in Behavioral and Community Health


    Credits: 5
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 201 PSY 208  
    Co-requisites: OTA 212C  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the role of occupational therapy in behavioral and community health settings. Emphasis is on the use of occupational-based activity in the evaluation, remediation and prevention of psychosocial dysfunction. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe behavioral health diagnoses commonly referred to occupational therapy.
    2. Explain the various types of behavioral and community health settings and the role of occupational therapy in each.
    3. Describe the various psychiatric commitment procedures.
    4. Summarize the components of effective group leadership.
    5. Describe the types and functions of group roles and appropriate activities for specific client populations.
    6. Describe occupational therapy evaluations commonly administered by OTAs in a behavioral health setting.
    7. Perform the basic techniques and procedures for selected lab activities.
    8. Identify occupational therapy modalities, techniques and activities appropriate to specific diagnoses and client types.
    9. Explain the influence that a healthy or unhealthy life space has on one’s occupational performance.
    10. Demonstrate effective documentation skills for occupational therapy services.
    Listed Topics
    1. Behavioral and community health settings
    2. Psychosocial  diagnoses
    3. Symptoms and behaviors
    4. Group process
    5. Activity analysis
    6. Clinical and client safety
    7. Treatment planning
    8. Commitment procedures
    9. Documentation
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • OTA 203 - Occupational Therapy in Aging Populations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 201  
    Co-requisites: OTA 213C  

    Description
    This course is an overview of the aging process, emphasizing occupational therapy evaluation and treatment of the physical and the psycho-social function of older populations. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Investigate personal attitudes toward aging and older adults.
    2. Define terms related to aging.
    3. Define healthy old age and successful aging.
    4. Describe the difference between primary and secondary aging.
    5. Analyze major demographic and health statistics of the older populations.
    6. Examine community and diversity influences in the aging process of the individual and society.
    7. Describe methods of activity programming to achieve purposeful activity and occupation.
    8. Describe emotional problems and mental health conditions commonly seen in old age.
    9. Describe physical conditions commonly seen in old age.
    10. Examine sensory changes in the older adult and appropriate compensatory techniques.
    11. Summarize the AOTA Standards of Practice with older adults.
    12. Differentiate occupational therapy treatment settings for older adults.
    Listed Topics
    1. Definitions of Aging
    2. Successful Aging
    3. Activity Programming
    4. Health Promotion
    5. Diversity Influences
    6. Demographics of Aging
    7. Areas of Practice
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/19


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  • OTA 204 - Professional Issues in Occupational Therapy


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 201  
    Co-requisites: OTA 202  and OTA 203  

    Description
    This course introduces professional issues and concerns in occupational therapy. Topics include organization of health care institutions, community health care agencies, ethics, licensure, malpractice and continuing education. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the progression of health care, particularly in the evolution of service delivery models.
    2. Define the role of occupation therapy in traditional and emerging areas of occupational therapy practice.
    3. Describe methods to influence public policy to effect changes in service delivery of occupational therapy.
    4. Explain the elements of intraprofessional team building between the Occupational Therapist (OT) and Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA).
    5. Identify the importance of professional responsibilities to liability concerns of practice.
    6. Illustrate methods to promote the profession and service of occupational therapy.
    7. Investigate the role and responsibilities of a Fieldwork educator.
    8. Create a job resume and cover letter.
    9. Define elements of time management.
    10. Analyze elements of communication and change.
    11. Summarize factors of quality assurance and program evaluation.
    12. State the importance of work settings’ policies and procedures.
    13. List national and state requirements for credentialing.
    14. Explain the importance of continued professional development.
    15. Summarize the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Code of Ethics.
    16. Evaluate information sources used in evidence-based practice in occupational therapy.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of Health Care
    2. Resume Writing
    3. Service Delivery Models
    4. Decision Making
    5. Emerging Areas of Practice
    6. Credentialing
    7. Work Settings’ Policies & Procedures
    8. Intraprofessional Team Building
    9. Quality Assurance
    10. Ethics
    11. Evidenced-based practice
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • OTA 205 - Contemporary Practice Issues in Occupational Therapy


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 101  and OTA 102  or Current Certification as an Occupational Therapy Assistant

     
    Description
    This elective course enhances the OTA student’s knowledge of specialty and innovative areas of practice in Occupational Therapy. The role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant is emphasized. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define a specialty area of practice in Occupational Therapy.
    2. Summarize implications of this practice area on the health care delivery system.
    3. Explain the process of client referral in this area of practice.
    4. Define the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant in a specialty area of practice.
    5. Describe common client problems addressed by this area of practice.
    6. Describe evaluation and treatment techniques commonly used in this area of practice.
    7. Explain reimbursement for services in this area of practice.
    8. Describe future trends in this area of practice.
    Listed Topics
    1. Practice settings
    2. Client referral
    3. Role of the OTA
    4. Evaluation
    5. Treatment techniques
    6. Client problems
    7. Reimbursement
    8. Future trends

     Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, professional journals, videos, handouts, internet and library resources.


    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • OTA 211C - Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 1/Physical Disabilities


    Credits: 2
    96 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , OTA 102  and PSY 108  
    Co-requisites: OTA 201  

    Description
    This course provides students experience through directed observation and participation in physical disabilities settings.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Display a professional appearance that does not interfere with patient/client relationship.
    2. Employ effective time management skills.
    3. Demonstrate professional oral and written communication skills.
    4. Display appropriate therapeutic interactions and involvement in the healthcare environment.
    5. Exercise dependability by successfully completing all Fieldwork related assignments.
    6. Show initiative in an appropriate and professional manner.
    7. Demonstrate responsibility for learning throughout the Fieldwork experience.
    8. Display an openness and willingness in response to supervision for professional development.
    9. Demonstrate safety in all aspects of the Fieldwork experience.
    10. Employ environmental maintenance consistently throughout the Fieldwork experience.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various clinical topics will be addressed and applied during this six (6) week assignment. Topics may vary due to the patients/clients seen at each specific location as well as Occupational Therapy treatment programming offered.
    Reference Materials
    No specific texts are required for fieldwork experiences. However, there may be assignments and readings from texts used in the corresponding lecture/lab course(s), previous courses and other professional publications
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • OTA 212C - Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 1/Behavioral and Community Health


    Credits: 1
    48 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 201   
    Co-requisites: OTA 202  

    Description
    This course provides students with experience through directed observation and participation in behavioral and community health settings.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Display a professional appearance that does not interfere with patient/client relationship.
    2. Employ effective time management skills.
    3. Demonstrate professional oral and written communication skills.
    4. Display appropriate therapeutic interactions and involvement in the healthcare environment.
    5. Exercise dependability by successfully completing all Fieldwork related assignments.
    6. Show initiative in an appropriate and professional manner.
    7. Demonstrate responsibility for learning throughout the Fieldwork experience.
    8. Display an openness and willingness in response to supervision for professional development.
    9. Demonstrate safety in all aspects of the Fieldwork experience.
    10. Employ environmental maintenance consistently throughout the Fieldwork experience.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various clinical topics will be addressed and applied during this assignment. Topics may vary due to the patients/clients seen at each specific location as well as occupational therapy treatment programming offered.
    Reference Materials
    No specific texts are required for fieldwork experiences. However, there may be assignments and readings from texts used in the corresponding lecture/lab course(s), previous courses and other professional publications.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • OTA 213C - Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 1/Aging Populations


    Credits: 1
    48 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites:   OTA 201   
    Co-requisites: OTA 203  

    Description
    This course provides experiences in the use of therapeutic activity programs in aging populations. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Function as a cooperative team member.
    2. Demonstrate ability to formulate and implement goals for a therapeutic activity session.
    3. Select appropriate activities based on group members’ interests and abilities.
    4. Modify behavior in response to supervisory feedback.
    5. Demonstrate punctuality with completion of assignments and reporting to the fieldwork site.
    6. Maintain tools, supplies, materials and the Fieldwork environment.
    7. Demonstrate professional written and oral communication skills.

     Listed Topics
    Various clinical topics will be addressed and applied during this six (6) week assignment. Topics may vary due to the patients/clients seen at each specific location as well as Occupational Therapy treatment programming offered.

     Reference Materials
    OTA 213 Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 1 Aging Populations Blackboard Web Site, Various materials on activity programming for the older adult.


    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • OTA 221C - Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 2A


    Credits: 5
    320 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of all academic and Level 1 Fieldwork requirements in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program.

     
    Description
    This eight-week, full-time Fieldwork experience takes place in diverse practice settings, supervised by an occupational therapy practitioner. This course focuses on professional development and competency of the occupational therapy assistant for entry-level practice.  Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 2A must be successfully completed before beginning Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 2B. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis and requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Display sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to the clinical site’s policies and procedures during all fieldwork-related activities.
    2. Adhere consistently to the American Occupational Therapy Association Code of Ethics and site’s policies and procedures.
    3. Clearly and accurately communicate the values, beliefs and roles of Occupational Therapy practitioners to client, family, significant others and other service providers.
    4. Effectively and accurately gather data, administer assessments, assist in the interpretation of data, report results, and assist in the development of client-centered and occupation-based goals under the supervision of and in collaboration with the Occupational Therapy practitioner.
    5. Appropriately plan, implement and modify as needed, relevant client-centered and occupation-based interventions in collaboration with client, family, significant others and other service providers.
    6. Clearly, effectively and accurately communicate in verbal, nonverbal and written form with clients, families, significant others, other service providers and the public.  Produce clear and accurate documentation according to clinical site requirements.
    7. Demonstrate professional behavior in all fieldwork-related activities.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various clinical topics will be addressed and applied during this eight (8) week assignment. Topics may vary due to the patients/clients seen at each specific location as well as Occupational Therapy treatment programming offered.
    Reference Materials
    No specific texts are required for fieldwork experiences. However, there may be assignments and readings from texts used in previous courses, other professional publications and CCAC library resources.
     
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • OTA 222C - Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 2B


    Credits: 5
    320 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: OTA 221C , Successful completion of all academic and Level 1 Fieldwork requirements in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program.

     
    Description
    This eight-week, full-time Fieldwork experience takes place in diverse practice settings, supervised by an occupational therapy practitioner. This course focuses on professional development and competency of the occupational therapy assistant for entry-level practice. Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 2A must be successfully completed before beginning Occupational Therapy Fieldwork 2B. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis and requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Display sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to the clinical site’s policies and procedures during all Fieldwork-related activities.
    2. Adhere consistently to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Code of Ethics and site’s policies and procedures.
    3. Communicate the values, beliefs and roles of Occupational Therapy practitioners clearly and accurately to client, family, significant others and other service providers.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to effectively gather data, administer assessments, assist in the interpretation of data, report results and assist in the development of client-centered and occupation-based goals under the supervision of and in collaboration with the Occupational Therapy practitioner.
    5. Implement relevant and appropriate client-centered and occupation-based interventions in collaboration with client, family, significant others and other service providers.
    6. Communicate accurately in verbal, nonverbal and written form with clients, families, significant others, other service providers and the public. 
    7. Produce clear and accurate documentation according to clinical site requirements.
    8. Demonstrate professional behavior in all Fieldwork-related activities.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various clinical topics will be addressed and applied during this eight (8) week assignment. Topics may vary due to the patients/clients seen at each specific location as well as Occupational Therapy treatment programming offered.
    Reference Materials
    No specific texts are required for fieldwork experiences. However, there may be assignments and readings from texts used in previous courses, other professional publications and CCAC library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


    Course and Section Search



Paralegal

  
  • PAL 101 - Legal Research and Writing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An introduction to legal research. Students learn to use legal research tools such as indexes, digest, encyclopedias, treatises, annotated reports, restatements, and law reviews. The West key number system and Shepard’s citations are taught. In addition, students learn how to do cite and proof checking of legal citations in briefs and other documents.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Function efficiently at the paralegal level.
    2. Perform legal research manually and using electronic systems.
    3. Be exposed to the tools available to a lawyer to ascertain the law.
    4. Effectively utilize legal tools.
    5. Possess the confidence to utilize a law library of any size.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Legal Research
    2. The Legal Research Process
    3. Court Reports
    4. Federal Court Decisions
    5. State Court Decisions and the National Reporter System
    6. Legislation Forms
    7. Digests for Court Reports
    8. Annotated Law Reports
    9. Constitutions
    10. Federal Legislation
    11. Federal Legislation Histories
    12. State and Municipal Legislation
    13. Court Rules and Procedures
    14. Administrative Law
    15. Loose-leaf Services
    16. Shepard’s Citations
    17. Legal Encyclopedias
    18. Legal Periodicals and Indexes
    19. Treatises, Restatements, Model Codes and Uniform Laws
    20. Other Research Aids
    21. English Legal Research
    22. Federal Tax Research
    23. International Law
    24. Computer Assisted Legal Research and Micro-text
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 05/21/1990


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 102 - Paralegal Orientation


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course designed to provide the Paralegal students with an overview of the profession, curriculum, required competencies, and ethics.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the role of a Paralegal in the law office environment.
    2. Identify various areas of specialization in the legal profession and the skills necessary to succeed in these environments.
    3. Identify ethical issues arising in a law office environment.
    4. Develop a strategy for meeting educational and professional goals in pursuing a career as a legal assistant professional.
    Listed Topics
    1. What is a Paralegal – history and development.
    2. Certifications and professional associations now and in the future.
    3. Ethics and professional responsibility including confidentiality, conflicts of interest, unauthorized practice of law.
    4. Various working environments – the small law firm to corporate legal departments and public service.
    5. Importance of clients and dealing with clients.
    6. Need to develop interpersonal and communications skills within the office setting – dealing with other professionals in the office.
    7. Importance and role of research skills.
    8. Function, tasks and assignments expected of Paralegals in specific concentrations of law, overview of tasks required in areas of law including Litigation, Family Law, Estates and Trust, Law of Real Property, Research Assistants, Criminal, Appeals process.
    9. Importance of assembling a representative collection of academic work during pursuit of the Certificate or Associate Degree.

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/01/2006


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  • PAL 105 - Family Law


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An analysis of the Pennsylvania Divorce Code and the problems of parties involved in separation and divorce. Emphasis is on preparation of divorce complaints, separation support and custody agreements.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Function efficiently at the paralegal level in a law office that practices in the family law.
    2. Develop an understanding of the tools to ascertain the law and effectively utilize these tools.
    3. Prepare and interpret documents filed with the courts in domestic or family law proceedings.
    4. Calculate and predict obligations created by a family relationship, particularly financial obligations of family members.
    Listed Topics
    1. Divorce: Procedure and Substantive Law and History
    2. Support and Alimony/Pendente Lite: Use of Guidelines and Alimony Support Procedures
    3. Child Custody Problems: Partial and Legal Custody Procedural and Substantive Law
    4. Equitable Distribution: Valuation of Assets Division Factors, and Application
    5. Adoption: Agency and Private
    6. Protection from Abuse
    Reference Materials
    Statutes and local forms.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/04/2005


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  • PAL 110 - Tort Law, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the study of tort law. Topics include intentional torts, defamation, strict liability and negligence. In addition, defenses to tort litigation and remedies are studied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. The student will be able define and identify intentional torts, defamation, strict liability and negligence.
    Listed Topics
    1. Elements of tort law
    2. Intentional torts
    • Assault
    • Battery
    • False imprisonment
    • Intentional infliction of emotional distress
    • Trespass to land
    • Trespass to chattels
    • Conversion

       3. Defamation
       4. Invasion of Privacy
       5. Misrepresentation
       6. Strict liability

    • Ultra hazardous activities
    • Ownership of animals
    • Products liability

       7. Negligence

    • Duty
    • Breach of duty
    • Causation
    • Damages

       8. Survival and wrongful death
       9. Torts against and within the family
     10. Tort defenses
     11. Workers’ compensation



    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 111 - Litigation 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An introduction to the differences between civil and criminal litigation with an emphasis on civil litigation. The student learns the rules which govern the lawsuit, the way legal principles are developed from prior court decisions and types of relief a court can give to a person. The student learns the variety of state and federal courts and their scope of jurisdiction. Emphasis is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Judicial Code.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Distinguish the differences between criminal and civil litigation.
    2. Identify and apply the rules and procedures which govern the lawsuit, how the legal dispute is disposed of in various judicial systems and accepting a client’s case to the collection process.
    3. Recognize the structure litigation may take at the state and federal levels and the functions of a paralegal in the litigation process.
    4. Analyze the ethical considerations involved in dealing with clients and interoffice as well as outside the office professionals.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principles of Litigation and ethical considerations throughout the litigation process
    2. Lawyer and Client Relationships
    3. Causes of Action and Remedies
    4. Affirmative Defenses
    5. Jurisdiction and Court Organization
    6. Introduction to Federal Procedures
    7. Pleadings
    8. Joinder of Claims and Parties
    9. Gathering the Evidence
    10. Investigation
    11. Interrogatories
    12. Expert Witness
    13. Oral Depositions
    14. Use of Oral Depositions at Trial
    15. Inspection of Documents
    16. Trial Preparation
    17. Trial
    18. Judgments
    19. Appeals
    20. Settlements, Releases, Collections
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software, and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/13/1997


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 112 - Litigation 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PAL 111  

     
    Description
    An introduction to the broad outlines of law in negligence and other tort law, contract law, corporation and shareholder actions and property law.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify fundamental principles of the substantive law of torts, contracts, products liability and equity.
    2. Recognize the significance of the various procedures learned in Litigation 1.
    3. Adapt legal research abilities to problems arising in pursuit of a lawsuit.
    4. Draft documents involved in the litigation process.
    5. Recognize complex ethical problems faced in a litigation law office.
    Listed Topics
    1. Review of Litigation Process
    2. Sources of Law
    3. Intentional Torts – Specific Causes of Action
    4. Negligence Law
    5. Strict Liability Concepts
    6. Products Liability
    7. Class Action
    8. Equity
    9. Contract Law
    10. The Application of Substantive Law to the Litigation Process and the ethics
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software, and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 05/21/1990


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  • PAL 121 - Estates and Trusts 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An introduction to trusts set up during a person’s lifetime and trusts and estates set up at a person’s death.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop legal skills that will work with a full practical knowledge of estates and trusts, enable them to know how to find estates and trusts law when the answers are not readily available and to administer assistance to the legal profession in accomplishment of these goals.
    2. Utilize the techniques and skills necessary to draft and complete documents relating to estates and trusts.
    3. Recognize the legal and ethical obligations of an estate professional to beneficiaries, the courts and other interested third parties and agencies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction and source of law
    2. The participants and the proper court
    3. The concept of property relating to wills, trusts, and estate
    4. The laws of succession, death testate or intestate, and the purpose of a will contests
    5. Preparing to draft a will: checklists
    6. Wills: validity, requirements, modification, revocation, and Pennsylvania probate procedure
    7. The conference with the client and confidentiality
    8. Estate planning and introduction to estate administration
    9. Death, taxes
    10. Legal and ethical obligations of an estate professional
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software, and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Lauth, Laurence Date Approved: 01/17/1983


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 122 - Estates and Trusts 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PAL 121  

     
    Description
    Students learn to prepare and file papers for appointing a decedent’s representative under a variety of local laws. Topics include discovery and valuing of estate assets, preparation of an inventory of assets and payment of a decedent’s debts. Students keep records of estate transactions to ensure that all work is accurate and performed on time.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use legal skills that will work with a full practical knowledge of estates and trusts, enable them to know how to find estates and trusts law when the answers are not readily available, and to administer assistance to the legal profession in accomplishment of these goals.
    2. Apply the theory taught in Estates and Trusts 1.
    3. Prepare documents required to administer a decedent’s estate or a trust from inception.
    4. Outline the significant contributions that can be made by an efficient paralegal in an estate and trust practice.
    Listed Topics
    1. Drafting and Executing a Valid Legal Will
    2. Introduction to Trusts
    3. Private Express Trusts
    4. Personal Representatives
    5. Formal Probate Administration
    6. Informal Probate Administration Under the Uniform Probate Code
    7. Tax Considerations
    8. Functions and Roles of Paralegals
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software, and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 05/21/1990


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 135 - Employee Benefits


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the blend of legal theory and practical legal skills that comprise employment law. The students will study the employment relationship from responding to advertisements for employment, interviewing, pre-employment testing, contracts of hire, employment compensation and benefits, employment evaluation through termination of employment. Issues of employment discrimination, equal pay, wage laws and the Family Medical Leave Act will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of employment issues.
    2. Define issues of employment discrimination.
    3. Identify tools and remedies available to address employment issues.
    4. Describe the employee’s right to privacy versus the employer’s right to monitor the workplace.
    5. Identify safety requirements in the workplace and Worker’s Compensation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Employee benefits
    2. Compensation and Human Resources Management
    3. Health benefits
    4. Retirement benefit plans
    5. Costing employee benefits
    6. Flexible benefits
    7. Harassment in the workplace
    8. Historical review of benefits
    9. Benefits and productivity
    10. Disability and Survivors Benefits including Social Security
    11. Exclusive benefits, executive perks and outplacement services
    12. Future trends in benefits
    13. Unemployment
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, internet and current library databases.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 201 - Advanced Legal Research and Writing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PAL 101  

     
    Description
    Students are trained to prepare research and analyze search in memoranda and briefs.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Build on skills obtained in Legal Research and Writing 1 and apply these research skills to writings.
    2. Write memorandums.
    3. Draft more formal writings such as appellate briefs and formal memorandum of law.
    Listed Topics
    1. Review of tools of a legal researcher from PAL 101  
    2. Development of in-depth approach to analyzing case law
    3. Formats for various research projects including inter-office memorandums, trial briefs, and appellate briefs
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software, and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Lauth, Laurence Date Approved: 01/17/1983


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 205 - Consumer Protection Law


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PAL 101  

     
    Description
    This course trains legal assistants legal assistants under the supervision of practicing attorneys to assist attorneys in helping firm clients overcome violations of federal and state consumer protection laws and the rules and regulations of federal and state administrative agencies designed to specifically protect consumers from illegal business practices.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Assist firm clients with the necessary requirements for exercise of the consumers rights of redress against illegal business practices.
    2. Compare and contrast Federal and State Consumer Protection Laws.
    3. Define unfair business practices.
    4. Explore remedies through the Federal and State Court Systems.
    5. Recognize trends in consumer protection law.
    Listed Topics
    1. Federal Consumer Protection Laws
    2. Pennsylvania Consumer Protection Laws
    3. Use of Federal and State Consumer Protection Agencies
    4. Private Consumer Help Agencies
    5. Use of Administrative Agencies for Consumer Redress
    6. Types of Transactions Legally Protected
    7. Use of the Court Systems for Legal Redress
    8. Effective Research of Consumer Problems
    Reference Materials
    • Allegheny Court Law Library
    • University of Pittsburgh Law Library
    • Duquesne University Law Library
    • Boyce and Allegheny Campus Law Libraries
    • Consumer Protection Law Text

    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/13/1997


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 209 - Environmental Law


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PAL 101  

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the Environmental Amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution and it’s administrative agency the Department of Environmental Resources and its interactions with federal law and the Environmental Protection Agency. The student acquires; a working knowledge of how regulations insure compliance with laws requiring clean streams, sewage facilities, wetlands, water resources, air pollution control, solid waste management, hazardous sites cleanup, storage tanks and other spill prevention, mining regulation, oil and gas regulation and protections from radiation and other hazardous situations.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify Environmental legislation.
    2. Process all necessary paperwork to successfully prosecute any environmental law problem.
    3. Research any environmental law topic with successful results given competent attorney direction.
    Listed Topics
    1. Exclusionary Rule
    2. Fruit of the Poisonous Tree
    3. Limits of Exclusionary Rule
    4. Harmless Error
    5. Fourth Amendment—Arrest
    6. Search and Seizure
    7. Warrants
    8. Warrant Execution
    9. Plain View Rule
    10. Administrative Inspection
    11. Border Searcher
    12. Wiretapping
    13. Sixth Amendment
    14. Fifth Amendment
    15. Miranda
    16. Pretrial Identification
    17. Remedy
    18. Pretrail Procedures
    19. Gerstein Hearings
    20. Pretrial Detention
    21. Grant Juries
    22. Speedy Trial Rules
    23. Defendant Competency
    24. Trial
    25. Right to Jury, Counsel
    26. Burdens/Tactics
    27. Pleas/Sentencing
    28. Legal Research
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary texts, software, and appropriate A-V materials.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/13/1997


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and  enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Learning Outcomes
    To provide student access to the practical application of the concepts both procedural and substantive learned in class. Student is exposed to law office environment under the guidance of practicing attorneys.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAL 406 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 6
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Dice, Frances Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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Paramedic

  
  • PAM 101 - Foundations of Paramedic Practice


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into PAM program BIO 110  or BIO 151  
    Co-requisites: BIO 161 , PAM 102  and PAM 112C  

    Description
    This course introduces the student to emergency medical care at the advanced life support level. Topics include the history of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and the EMS system, the roles, responsibilities, professionalism and well-being of the EMS provider and the medical, legal and ethical considerations specific to paramedic care. Course will also involve patient assessment, life-span development and EMS operations topics. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List major developments in the history and development of EMS systems.
    2. Define three roles, responsibilities and professional attributes of an EMS provider.
    3. Complete a patient care report and trip sheet on a simulated patient encounter.
    4. Complete appropriate assessments on simulated medical and trauma patients.
    5. Utilize monitoring devices to obtain patient vital signs.
    6. Apply concepts of EMS Operations to specified emergency situations.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of EMS
    2. EMS systems
    3. Roles and responsibilities of the paramedic
    4. Quality improvement and research applications for EMS
    5. Workforce safety and wellness
    6. EMS communications
    7. Documentation, medical/legal and ethical issues
    8. Life span development
    9. Patient assessment, history taking, monitoring devices
    10. EMS operations
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 06/01/2016


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  • PAM 102 - Airway Management and Pharmacology


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into PAM program BIO 110  or BIO 151  
    Co-requisites: BIO 161 , PAM 101  and PAM 112C  

    Description
    This course provides instruction and lab application of techniques and equipment for airway management and pharmacologic interventions used by the paramedic. Students will learn to select and use various airway management equipment as required by the patient’s condition and general pharmacology principles and specific medications indicated by paramedic treatment protocols. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify agencies which regulate various medications.
    2. Determine the appropriate indication, route of administration and dosage for various medications used by the paramedic.
    3. Identify the five “Rights” when administering a medication.
    4. Define aseptic technique and correctly apply its principles in a lab setting.
    5. Identify proper selection and technique to utilize airway management and ventilation devices.
    6. Demonstrate correct procedure for placement of simple and advanced airway management devices.
    7. Verify proper placement of an advanced airway device using at least three methods.
    8. Interpret findings from monitoring devices such as pulse oximeters and capnographs.
    9. Demonstrate psychomotor skill proficiency in administering medications and managing airways.
    Listed Topics
    1. Regulatory aspects of pharmacology
    2. Drug classes and preparations
    3. Medication safety, administration routes and dosage calculations
    4. Drug actions, interactions, and adverse effects
    5. Medications specific to paramedic care
    6. Airway management devices
    7. Assessment and physiology of the respiratory system
    8. Monitoring devices applicable to airway management
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • PAM 103 - Cardiology and Pulmonology


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161 , PAM 101 , PAM 102  and PAM 112C  
    Co-requisites: BIO 162 , PAM 104 , PAM 105  and PAM 116C  

    Description
    This course covers cardiology and pulmonology for the paramedic, involving interpretation of cardiac rhythms, treatment protocols and assessment and intervention of respiratory deficiencies. Emphasis is placed on identifying EKG rhythms and using patient assessment information. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe components in a normal EKG tracing and correlate to activity in the cardiac cycle.
    2. Identify abnormal EKGs including tachycardias, bradycardias, AV blocks, atrial rhythms, ventricular rhythms, premature contractions, paced rhythms and asystole in both 3-lead and 12-lead format.
    3. Demonstrate proper electrode placement and technique to obtain 3-lead and 12-lead EKG readings.
    4. Apply rhythm interpretation and select proper treatment interventions for various cardiac dysrhythmias.
    5. Demonstrate ability to use cardiac monitor/defibrillators to deliver appropriate therapeutic electrical interventions.
    6. List treatment for various cardiovascular conditions.
    7. Classify respiratory system dysfunctions and proper treatment interventions.
    8. Utilize pulse oximetry and capnography to assess respiratory system function.
    9. Describe V/Q mismatch and appropriate interventions.
    10. Apply paramedic pharmacology to cardiac and pulmonary conditions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cardiac cycle and normal electrophysiologic activity as recorded on EKG
    2. Assessment specific to cardiac or respiratory conditions
    3. Electrode placement for 3-lead and 12-lead EKG
    4. Operation of various cardiac monitor/defibrillators to assess and deliver therapy
    5. Identification and treatment of cardiac dysrhythmias
    6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    7. Pathophysiology of cardiac and respiratory conditions
    8. Pulmonary function values and capacities
    9. Capnography values and waveform interpretation in breathing and ventilated patients
    10. CPAP application
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • PAM 104 - Shock and Trauma


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161 , PAM 101 , PAM 102  and PAM 112C  
    Co-requisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 105  and PAM 116C  

    Description
    This course covers shock conditions and traumatic injuries. Topics will include the various types of shock and pathophysiology of each, treatment interventions for shock and the various types of traumatic injuries a paramedic may encounter. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List the various types of shock and the typical causes of each.
    2. Describe the pathophysiology of shock and assessment findings which indicate compensated or decompensated shock.
    3. Discuss differences in presentation of shock typically seen in various patient age groups.
    4. Conduct a patient assessment for a trauma patient.
    5. Select appropriate treatment interventions for shock scenarios.
    6. Identify traumatic injuries using scene size-up, kinematic assessment and patient assessment findings.
    7. Select treatment interventions for patients with local or multi-system traumatic injuries.
    Listed Topics
    1. Recognition and identification of the various types of shock
    2. Treatment of shock
    3. Trauma assessment and use of trauma scores
    4. Trauma triage and transport considerations
    5. Treatment of traumatic injuries including multi-system trauma
    6. Immobilization and helmet removal
    7. Soft-tissue and orthopedic injuries including burns
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 105 - Special Patient Populations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161 , PAM 101 , PAM 102  and PAM 112C  
    Co-requisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 104  and PAM 116C  

    Description
    This course encompasses pathophysiology and knowledge of psychosocial needs to address special patient populations. Topics include treatment of pregnant, neonatal, pediatric, geriatric, developmentally delayed and other patient groups. Course will also address awareness of cultural diversity and delivery of culturally-competent care. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify at least six special patient populations and considerations to enhance delivery of emergency care to these groups.
    2. Perform specialized assessments as indicated for special patient populations.
    3. Identify the three stages of labor and indications of each.
    4. Demonstrate steps to assist in emergency childbirth.
    5. Identify complications of emergency childbirth and appropriate interventions.
    6. Assess a neonate and perform appropriate treatment interventions.
    7. Discuss cultural influences and apply knowledge of cultural differences to interactions with patients.
    Listed Topics
    1. Obstetrics
    2. Neonatal assessment and resuscitation
    3. Pediatric assessment and management
    4. Geriatric assessment and management
    5. Abuse and neglect
    6. Technology assisted or dependent patients
    7. Developmentally delayed patients
    8. Hospice/end of life care
    9. Culturally competent care
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 112C - Paramedic Clinical 1


    Credits: 1
    64 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into PAM program BIO 110  or BIO 151  
    Co-requisites: BIO 161 , PAM 101  and PAM 102  

    Description
    This course is a clinical rotation which will involve hospital and field application of skills and techniques learned in the classroom. Students will complete required patient contacts and track interventions. Students are responsible for providing and paying for transportation to all clinical sites as well as all other related costs. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Assess patients in specific age and illness categories.
    2. Perform airway management techniques on patients in a clinical setting.
    3. Place endotracheal tubes in a supervised setting.
    4. Select appropriate medications for specific patient conditions.
    5. Administer medications using correct route, dose and technique.
    6. Operate monitoring devices to assess patients and influence treatment decisions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient assessment
    2. Airway management and ventilation
    3. Administration of approved paramedic medications appropriate for patient condition
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 116C - Paramedic Clinical 2


    Credits: 2
    120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 161 , PAM 101 , PAM 102  and PAM 112C  
    Co-requisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 104  and PAM 105  

    Description
    This course is a clinical rotation which will involve hospital and field application of skills and techniques learned in the classroom and laboratory. Students will complete required patient contacts and track interventions. Students are responsible for providing and paying for transportation to all clinical sites as well as all other related costs. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify EKG rhythms and initiate proper interventions.
    2. Administer medications as indicated by patient condition.
    3. Utilize equipment such as cardiac monitor/defibrillators, ventilators and monitoring devices.
    4. Perform CPR as appropriate.
    5. Apply knowledge of pulmonology and respiratory interventions to clinical settings.
    6. Apply knowledge of special patient populations to patients presenting in clinical settings.
    7. Utilize knowledge of cultural awareness to provide culturally competent care.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cardiac rhythm interpretation and management
    2. Assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, shock and trauma patients
    3. Labor and delivery
    4. Neonatal assessment and management
    5. Geriatric assessment and management
    6. Interaction with special patient populations
    7. Culturally-competent care
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 201 - Medical Emergencies


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 104 , PAM 105  and PAM 116C  
    Co-requisites: PAM 202 , PAM 213C  and PAM 214C  

    Description
    This course covers pathophysiology and psychosocial needs to assess and treat medical emergencies. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Select appropriate interventions to care for medical emergencies.
    2. Demonstrate specialized assessment techniques for patients with neurological, abdominal or other medical emergencies.
    3. Identify major components of blood and their functions.
    4. Compare pathophysiology of diabetic conditions common in emergency care and the proper treatment of each.
    5. Use personal protective equipment to prevent transmission of a communicable disease.
    6. Communicate effectively to improve outcome for a patient experiencing a psychiatric emergency.
    Listed Topics
    1. Neurological emergencies
    2. Abdominal and gastrointestinal emergencies
    3. Immunology
    4. Endocrine emergencies
    5. Toxicological emergencies
    6. Hematological emergencies
    7. Genitourinary/gynecological emergencies
    8. Psychiatric emergencies
    9. Infectious diseases
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 202 - Integrated Paramedic Concepts


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours 120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 104 , PAM 105  and PAM 116C  
    Co-requisites: PAM 201 , PAM 213C  and PAM 214C  

    Description
    This course will integrate paramedic program information and skills in accordance with the National Registry of EMTs psychomotor and didactic testing. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Complete patient assessment and management for a simulated medical patient.
    2. Complete patient assessment and management for a simulated trauma patient.
    3. Complete bleeding control/shock management scenarios.
    4. Complete cardiac arrest/AED management scenarios.
    5. Complete intravenous therapy scenarios.
    6. Complete basic skill scenarios including joint immobilization, bleeding control, long bone immobilization and spinal immobilization for both supine and seated patients.
    7. Complete adult ventilatory management scenarios.
    8. Complete pediatric assessment, respiratory compromise and intraosseous infusion scenarios.
    9. Complete static and dynamic cardiology scenarios.
    10. Complete oral patient management scenarios.
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical patient assessment/management
    2. Trauma patient assessment/management
    3. Bleeding/shock control
    4. Cardiac arrest/AED
    5. Intravenous therapy
    6. Intraosseous therapy of pediatric patient
    7. Random basic skills
    8. Adult ventilatory management
    9. Supraglottic airway device insertion
    10. Cardiology recognition and management - static and dynamic
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 213C - Paramedic Clinical 3


    Credits: 1
    64 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 104 , PAM 105  and PAM 116C  
    Co-requisites: PAM 201 , PAM 202  and PAM 214C  

    Description
    This course is a clinical rotation which will involve hospital and field application of skills and techniques learned in the classroom. Students will complete required patient contacts and track interventions. Students are responsible for providing and paying for transportation to all clinical sites as well as all other related costs. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Conduct assessments on patients in specific age and illness categories.
    2. Provide treatment interventions appropriate for patient condition.
    3. Select appropriate medications for specific patient conditions.
    4. Administer medications using correct route, dose and techniques.
    5. Interpret information from monitoring devices to influence treatment decisions.
    6. Identify and provide treatment for various medical emergencies.
    7. Assess and manage patients with traumatic injuries.
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient assessment and treatment
    2. Psychomotor skills appropriate for patient condition
    3. Affective attributes required to effectively provide emergency care
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PAM 214C - Paramedic Field Externship


    Credits: 4
    256 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , PAM 103 , PAM 104 , PAM 105  and PAM 116C  
    Co-requisites: PAM 201 , PAM 202  and PAM 213C  

    Description
    This course incorporates all paramedic program knowledge, skills and affective techniques into a comprehensive field externship. Each student will be assigned to an EMS service and will perform as a team leader under supervision of a specified preceptor. Students will complete required patient contacts and track interventions. Students are responsible for providing and paying for transportation to all clinical sites as well as all other related costs. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Conduct assessments on patients in specific age and illness categories.
    2. Determine treatment interventions appropriate for patient condition.
    3. Manage all aspects of an emergency situation from pre-dispatch to transfer of care to the emergency department.
    4. Function as a team leader with minimal input from preceptor.
    5. Display affective attributes required to function effectively as a paramedic.
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient assessment and treatment knowledge
    2. Psychomotor skills appropriate for patient condition
    3. Affective attributes required to effectively provide emergency care
       
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search



Philosophy

  
  • PHL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of basic philosophical problems including: the existence of God, the immortality of the soul, knowledge, the mind-body problem, ethics in society, subjectivism, objectivism and pragmatism, political problems arising from philosophical ideas and the theory of beauty.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop critical analytical skills in reading and writing by constructing a philosophical essay.
    2. Apply learned terms in the discipline of philosophy while assessing ideas in class discussion and debate.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to present and critique arguments from presented authors and the student.
    4. Identify the importance of careful analytical thinking and awareness through discussion and essay.
    5. Demonstrate comfortable use of vocabulary necessary for classroom discussions via short answers in class essays.
    Listed Topics
    1. Issues of philosophical analysis and description
    2. Branches and methods of philosophy
    3. The value of philosophy and its limits
    4. Basic questions and breakthroughs of the historical eras in philosophy
    5. Historically noted thinkers and theories in the discipline
    6. Optional: God-existence, Ethics, Freedom, Sexuality and Gender, Knowledge
    Reference Materials
    Texts with primary and secondary sources
    Associated multimedia materials as additions to text contents
     
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • PHL 103 - Logic


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a non-mathematical approach to methods for everyday reasoning. Application to daily life is emphasized. Topics covered include analysis of statements; valid deductions - logical connections, syllogisms, their analysis and application; generalizing, classification and analogies; conditional arguments and common fallacies; and an introduction to symbolic logic.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the complex relationships between language, thinking and existence.
    2. Evaluate a variety of models of argumentation in class discussions.
    3. Apply informal logic in assessing written and spoken presentations.
    4. Apply the roles, structures and tests of arguments as evidenced by probability calculations.
    5. Demonstrate a logically more rigorous use of language in academic and daily life.
    6. Implement critical analytical skills in reading and writing via a written paper.
    7. Apply formal logic to presented arguments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Informal fallacies
    2. Categorical propositions
    3. Validity and truth values or false values in logic and statements
    4. Syllogisms
    5. Symbols use to logical notation
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks or exercise manuals, handouts
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHL 111 - Religions of the World


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a description of the origins, development and manifestations of major world religions. Students explore how people of different faiths practice and express their beliefs. Similarities and differences of different faiths are emphasized.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the variety and details of belief systems of the major world religions.
    2. Identify the root terms of the major world religions.
    3. Describe how people of different faiths practice and express their beliefs through worship and ritual.
    4. Explain the relationship between religious practice and belief.
    5. Relate the commonalities found in all religions.
    6. Explain the sociocultural histories of the major world religions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam
    2. Characteristic similarities that religions have in common
    3. Sectarian developments and differences
    4. Beginnings and rudiments of ancient and primal religious beliefs
    5. Current international and cross-cultural changes in religions
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • PHL 155 - Ethics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of selected topics from classical and contemporary ethics. Students examine the principles of moral evaluation and reasoning, factual judgment and responsibility.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe key elements of major ethical theories.
    2. Assess key elements of major ethical theories.
    3. Analyze ethics as a discipline and how it relates to society, law, personal growth and other branches of philosophy.
    4. Apply concepts and examples from the studies when developing and assessing one’s own moral principles and habits.
    5. Evaluate ethical dilemmas using theories presented in class.
    6. Identify current moral problems in everyday life.
    Listed Topics
    1. Awareness and appreciation of ethics as a discipline
    2. Ideas and deciding as themes of alternative theories in ethics
    3. Ethics, social action, public policies and the call to virtue
    4. Examples of typical and current moral problems and reasoning
    5. Standard controversies in moral concepts or theories in ethics
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHL 157 - Existentialism


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of philosophical questions arising from human existence: the nature of truth, freedom, responsibility, individuality and relationships with others. The writings of Kierkegaard, Neitzsche and other Existentialists are required reading.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define existentialism.
    2. Identify key philosophical figures that have influenced the development of existentialism.
    3. Assess the main themes of existentialist thought.
    4. Outline the various approaches taken towards the basic themes of existentialist philosophy.
    5. Critique common existentialist themes as they have been addressed in primary texts.
    6. Analyze the contributions of existentialism to contemporary philosophy.
    Listed Topics
    1. The writings and theories of Nietzsche
    2. The writings and theories of Kierkegaard
    3. The writings and theories of Husserl
    4. The writings and theories of Heidegger
    5. The writings and theories of Jaspers
    6. The writings and theories of Sartre
    7. The writings and theories of Merleau-Ponty
    8. The writings and theories of Camus
    9. The writings and theories of Ricouer
    10. The writings and theories of Levinas
       
    Reference Materials
    Library, selected texts to be studied
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHL 160 - Ethics in Business


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This philosophy course in applied ethics exposes students to ethics theories and traditions. Students apply those theories to decision making in the business world.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe various types of ethical reasoning; consequentialist/teleological and non-consequentialist/deontological.
    2. Explain the ethical objectivist’s response to the ethical relativist, and its affects on the contradictory nature of ethical egoism.
    3. Apply the ethics theories/traditions that are presented in this course to the ethical challenges found in the world of business, including its effect on Affirmative Action.
    4. Describe Rawls’s Theory of Justice and Nozick’s Entitlement Theory. 
    5. Explain the process of change needed to address moral distress.
    6. Explain the relationship Marx described between production and the social order.
    Listed Topics
    1. Ethical reasoning
    2. Ethical subjectivism/relativism
    3. Ethical egoism
    4. Ethics theories: utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, natural law theory, virtue ethics, care ethics, symphonology
    5. Economic justice
    6. Marx & capitalism
    7. Equality & discrimination
    8. Moral distress in the workplace
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • PHL 205 - Medical Ethics and Law


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an ethics seminar. Students are introduced to basic ethical concepts followed by problems in medical care such as professional responsibility and patient relationships. Ethical and legal issues are examined and laws having a bearing upon medical care are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate a general framework in philosophy from which to probe the conflicting demands and choices facing society in general, particularly in healthcare through participation in the course journal.
    2. Develop diverse perspectives upon the presuppositions, values and premises brought into question by the technical and human possibility of medicine via a course term paper.
    3. Apply ethics theories presented to the ethical challenges in healthcare.
    4. Explain the relationship of ethics and law in healthcare.
    5. Describe the ethical dilemmas related to death and dying.
    6. Identify the moral issues surrounding science and technology.

     Listed Topics

    1. Ethics and medicine relative to concepts of life
    2. Ethics and medicine relative to death and dying
    3. Moral issues concerning suffering
    4. Medicine, the law, and behavior control
    5. Experiments on human beings: medicine, ethics, and the law
    6. Patient relationships
    7. Health care delivery
    8. Health professions, caregivers, neglect and malpractice
    9. Genetic control and its ethical issues
    10. Alternative views and concerns relative to abortion
    11. Science, technologies, and human dignity
    12. The issues around the natural versus the artificial
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search



Pharmacy

  
  • PHT 100 - Introduction to Pharmacy Practice


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician (PHT) Program

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the practice of pharmacy. Topics will include an overview of the profession, practice sites, drug distribution systems, technician responsibilities, quality assurance and quality improvement, drug information systems, effective communication and pharmaceutical calculations. There are required on-site visits to hospitals, homecare and retail pharmacies. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain pharmacy technician responsibilities in various health care settings.
    2. Utilize pharmacy terms and medical terminology.
    3. Perform different types of pharmaceutical calculations.
    4. Compare automation and drug distribution systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pharmacy and medical terminology
    2. Drug distribution systems
    3. Mail order practice
    4. Robotics
    5. Senior care
    6. Aging and long-term care
    7. Nursing home and retail
    8. Parenteral therapy
    9. Home infusion technology
    10. Infection control
    11. Dosage forms and extemporaneous compounding
    12. Pharmacy math
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, discussion, tours, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 101 - Pharmacology 1 for Pharmacy Technicians


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: BIO 103  

    Description
    This course introduces students to current concepts in pharmacology. Topics include basic drug actions, indications for drug therapy, toxicity, side effects and safe therapeutic and dosage ranges. Drugs affecting the autonomic and central nervous system, pain relief and cardiac medications are discussed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and explain the action of drugs according to therapeutic classification.
    2. Compare theories of drug action and processes mediating that action.
    3. Explain drug standards and legislation as applied to classifications of drugs.
    4. Identify drug dosage ranges.
    5. Identify drugs by generic and trade name.
    6. Explain pertinent adverse reactions and side effects of drugs.
    7. Compare body system actions and reactions to drug therapy.
    Listed Topics
    1. Generic concepts
    2. Adrenergic and adrenergic blockers
    3. Cholinergic and cholinergic blockers
    4. Drugs affecting autonomic ganglia
    5. Skeletal muscle relaxants
    6. Local anesthetics
    7. Central nervous system
    8. Sedative and hypnotic drugs
    9. Tranquilizer and antidepressant drugs
    10. Antiepileptic drugs
    11. Antiparkinson drugs
    12. Narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics
    13. Anti-inflammatory drugs
    14. Physiology and pathology of the heart
    15. Cardiac glycosides
    16. Antianginal drugs
    17. Antiarrhythmic drugs
    18. Hypolipidemics
    19. Diuretics
    20. Antihypersensitive drugs
    21. Electrolytes and intravenous therapy
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussions, handouts, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 102 - Pharmacology 2 for Pharmacy Technicians


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PHT 101  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of Pharmacology 1 for Pharmacy Technicians (PHT 101 ). Topics include pharmacology of the vascular and renal systems, gastro-intestinal tract and endocrine system. Chemotherapy of cancer and the pharmacology of infectious diseases are discussed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and explain the action of drugs according to therapeutic classification.
    2. Compare theories of drug action and processes mediating that action.
    3. Explain drug standards and legislation as applied to classification of drugs.
    4. Identify drug dosage ranges.
    5. Identify drugs by generic and trade name.
    6. Explain pertinent adverse reactions and side effects of drugs.
    7. Compare body system actions and reactions to drug therapy.
    Listed Topics
    1. Antiallergic antihistamine drugs
    2. Bronchodilator drugs
    3. Antacids
    4. Diarrhea and constipation
    5. Endocrine system
    6. Steroids of the adrenal gland
    7. Drugs of the thyroid gland
    8. Pancreatic hormones and hyperglycemic drugs
    9. General concepts of antibiotic drugs
    10. Antibiotics
    11. Enteral/parenteral nutrition
    12. Vitamins and minerals
    13. Antineoplastics
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussion, handouts, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 103 - Pharmacy Practice 1


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 100 , PHT 100  and PHT 101  

     
    Description
    This course encompasses the collection and organization of information for patient care, drug use review and departmental management. The role of the technician in the purchasing, inventory, and billing of pharmaceuticals, devices and supplies is also explored. Additionally, the student learns prescription assessment and practices various means of cart fill and exchange. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform manual and automated cart fills and exchanges.
    2. Explain purchasing and inventory control of pharmaceuticals.
    3. Explain drug use review and safe medication use.
    4. Explain retail practice and over the counter drugs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical and pharmacy records
    2. Manual cart fill
    3. Automated cart fill
    4. Controlled substances
    5. Quality assurance
    6. Safe medication use
    7. Immunizations
    8. Managed care billing
    9. Communication skills and negotiation
    10. Purchasing and inventory control/long term care
    11. Retail practice
    12. Over the counter drugs
    13. Nutritional support
    14. Drug therapy monitoring
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussion, laboratory sessions, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 104 - Pharmacy Product Preparation 1


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHT 100  and PHT 101  
    Co-requisites: PHT 102 , PHT 103  and PHT 105  

    Description
    This course covers the preparation of non-compounded products for distribution. This includes an understanding of the role of the technician and the pharmacist in this job responsibility. The skills of drug preparation, including retrieval from inventory, profiling, calculations, measuring and safety precautions are taught. In addition, students learn to label drug products, supply the correct supplemental patient information, store products safely, apply quality assurance measures and abide by laws, regulations and standards that affect preparing such drugs for dispensing. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define metrology and explain the use of the prescription balance.
    2. Compute percentages in pharmacy calculations.
    3. Perform ratios and proportions in pharmacy calculations.
    4. Perform concentrations and dilutions in pharmacy calculations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Metrology
    2. Orders and pick station
    3. Packaging and labeling
    4. Percentages
    5. Prescription balance
    6. Ratio and proportion
    7. Drug information
    8. Over the counter drugs
    9. Concentration and dilution
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussion, laboratory sessions, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 105 - Pharmacy Product Preparation 2


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHT 100  and PHT 101  
    Co-requisites: PHT 102 , PHT 103  and PHT 104  

    Description
    This course prepares students to compound both non-sterile and sterile products. This includes calculating the appropriate amount of each ingredient and using the correct compounding techniques. These activities are done while applying corresponding techniques, applying corresponding quality assurance procedures and performing activities in accordance with the laws, regulations and standards that govern the preparation of sterile and non-sterile products. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compute fractions and decimals in pharmacy calculations.
    2. Perform dosage and flow rates in pharmacy calculations.
    3. Explain proper techniques of extemporaneous compounding.
    4. Explain the proper techniques for preparing small and large volume sterile products.
    Listed Topics
    1. Fractions and decimals
    2. Aseptic technique
    3. Aseptic technique and latex allergies
    4. Sterile product and compounding standards
    5. Small volume and parenterals
    6. Large volume and parenterals
    7. Extemporaneous compounding
    8. IV compatibilities
    9. Dosage and flow rates
    10. Stress management
    11. Parenteral and enteral nutrition
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussions, laboratory sessions, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 106 - Pharmacy Production Preparation 3


    Credits: 2
    1 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHT 103 , PHT 104  and PHT 105  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the preparation of specialized parenteral products. Included are home infusions, chemotherapy and miscellaneous specialized products such as monoclonal antibodies. The use of corresponding quality assurance processes and applications of laws, regulations and standards that govern the preparation of the drug products are discussed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain home infusion devices such as elastomeric pumps and remote reservoirs.
    2. Prepare chemotherapy infusions using techniques such as venting and negative pressure.
    3. Perform and explain the preparation of specialized infusions involving stability and compatibility issues.
    4. Compute fractions, decimals and percentages, ratio and proportions in pharmacy calculations.
    5. Explain the use of flow rates, concentrations and dilutions in pharmacy calculations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Home infusion therapies
    2. Chemotherapy
    3. Chemotherapy preparations
    4. Special product therapies
    5. Special product preparations
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussions, laboratory sessions, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 201C - Pharmacy Technician Externship


    Credits: 6
    320 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Grade “C” or better in all PHT courses.

     
    Description
    This course provides students with on the job experience in a hospital and retail pharmacy under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist. The student learns to function as a Pharmacy Technician. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform pharmacy technician duties in a hospital pharmacy.
    2. Perform pharmacy technician duties in a retail pharmacy.
    3. Explain pharmacy technician duties in specialized hospital pharmacy areas.
    4. Explain pharmacy technician duties in specialized retail pharmacy areas.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hospital inpatient pharmacy
    2. Retail pharmacy
    3. IV compounding
    4. Communication
    5. HIPAA
    6. Ethics
    7. Specialized pharmacy areas
    Reference Materials
    Observation and performance of pharmacy technician duties in a hospital pharmacy facility.
    Observation and performance of pharmacy technician duties in a retail pharmacy facility.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 202 - Pharmacy Law


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PHT 101  

     
    Description
    This course will explore the laws and current issues that can impact the practice of pharmacy. It will allow the pharmacy technician student to understand the parameters of safe practice. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the origination of law as it relates to pharmacy.
    2. Explain federal law as it relates to pharmacy practice.
    3. Explain the Pennsylvania state laws pertaining to pharmacy practice.
    4. Define ethics and examine ethical dilemmas a pharmacy technician can face in the profession.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pharmacy laws and ethics
    2. The legal system in the United States
    3. History and development of the current law
    4. The Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act
    5. Federal Controlled Substance Act
    6. Federal legislation
    7. Ethics theory and application
    8. Prevention of medication errors
    9. HIPAA issues
    10. Patient safety
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussions, presentation of images, videos, handouts, case studies, etc.
    Approved By: Flores, Roy Date Approved: 01/31/2003


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHT 203 - Pharmacy Seminar


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course deals with issues that impact the attitudes, values, beliefs and practices of a successful pharmacy technician. Some of the topics examined include personal qualities appropriate to the pharmacy profession, the obligation to remain current with advances in therapy, developing effective work relationships, problem solving, workflow management and the job search process. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the personal qualities, professionalism, appropriate image, respect and interpersonal skills needed by the pharmacy technician for the delivery of services for all customers regardless of cultural diversity.
    2. Explain the benefits of active involvement in technician and other pharmacy organizations and identify and utilize resources for staying current with advances in pharmacy practice.
    3. Explain the principles and methodology for managing change, problem solving and consensus building for efficient work flow management.
    4. Complete a resume and demonstrate preparation for a job search.
    5. Explain the value and process of obtaining technician certification.
    Listed Topics
    1. Personal qualities
    2. Interpersonal working relationships
    3. Communications
    4. Ethics
    5. Diversity
    6. Confidentiality and HIPAA
    7. Patient behind the prescription
    8. Current issues
    9. Resumes and interviews
    10. Pharmacy organizations
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, discussions, guest speakers, presentation of images, videos, student role play and reports, group projects, case studies, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search



Phlebotomy

  
  • PHB 101 - Clinical Phlebotomy


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Application and acceptance into the Phlebotomist Program
    Co-requisites: PHB 211  

    Description
    This course provides students with the knowledge, skills and behaviors required for competency as a phlebotomist. Areas of concentration include a survey of the anatomy and physiology of veins used for phlebotomy, basic skills and responsibilities of the phlebotomist, analytical tests, color coded vacuum tubes used for specimens, collection of body fluid specimens, the Clinical and Laborartory Standards Institute (CLSI) order of draw, the infection cycle and infection control. Skills obtained in the laboratory include standard precautions, venipuncture techniques, skin puncture techniques and prevention of complications when drawing blood.  Additional hours of practice time under direct supervision of an instructor are required.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Locate and name the veins commonly used for phlebotomy.
    2. List the commonly used vacuum collection tubes and the analytical tests associated with each.
    3. List the CLSI recommended order of draw.
    4. Explain the correct procedure for collecting and transporting blood and body fluid specimens.
    5. Identify the analytical laboratory departments and tests performed in each.
    6. Outline infection control procedures.
    7. Describe the infection cycle.
    8. Perform proper skin puncture techniques to obtain blood specimens.
    9. Perform proper venipuncture tecniques to obtain blood specimens.
    10. Apply techniques to prevent complications in blood collection.
    11. Demonstrate the ability to handle complications during blood collection.
    12. Describe standard precautions as established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic anatomy and physiology of body systems
    2. Medical terminology to include directional terms, anatomic regions and cavities of the body
    3. Basic anatomy of the circulatory system
    4. Blood and body fluid precautions
    5. Documentation, specimen handling and transportation of specimens
    6. Blood collection equipment
    7. Procedures for collecting blood specimens
    8. Preanalytic complications in blood collection
    9. Pediatric procedures
    10. Special collection procedures
    11. Elderly, home and long-term care collections
    12. Urinalysis, body fluids and other specimens
    13. Forensic toxicology, workplace testing, sports medicine and related areas
    14. Role of the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) related to blood and body fluid specimens
    15. Identification process for inpatients
    16. Methods of hand hygiene
    17. Identification of appropriate sites for venipuncture and situations when these sites might not be acceptable
    18. Process and time limits for applying a tourniquet to a patient’s arm
    19. Decontamination process and agents used to decontaminate skin for routine blood tests and blood cultures
    20. Steps of a venipuncture procedure
    21. “Order of Draw” for collection tubes
    22. Time specimens
    23. Fasting and STAT specimens
    24. Capillary blood specimens
    25. Procedure for making a blood smear
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks, internet sites, etc.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHB 201C - Clinical Phlebotomy Practicum


    Credits: 3
    160 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: ALH 106 , PHB 101 , PHB 211  and permission of instructor

     
    Description
    This course is a supervised, non-paid 160 hour practicum experience at a hospital, blood drawing station or doctor’s office. Additional experience and training in phlebotomy are provided to develop knowledge, skills and behaviors learned in the program. The practicum is offered weekdays during the day. Prior to the practicum current Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) certification, Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance and State Police Criminal Record Check (Act 33/34) and a physical examination are required. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform venipuncture and skin punctures to obtain blood specimens.
    2. Prepare blood and body fluid specimens for analysis according to industry standards.
    3. Recognize and respond to verbal and non-verbal communication.
    4. Display behaviors in accordance with regulations, policies, laws and patient rights.
    5. Explain the importance of specimen collection.
    Listed Topics
    1. Telephone procedures
    2. Patient records
    3. Preparation of the patient personal protective equipment
    4. Laboratory organization
    5. Blood specimens collection
    6. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) waived tests
    7. Quality control in the laboratory
    8. Laboratory safety
    9. Quality control in the laboratory
    10. Laboratory safety
    11. Styles and types of communication
    12. Culture and environmental, developmental life stage, language and physical barriers to communication.
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks, internet sites, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHB 211 - Clinical Phlebotomy Seminar


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: PHB 101  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the role of the phlebotomist as a member of the health care team. Areas of concentration include professionalism, personal qualifications, quality control, effective communication skills, medical law and ethics and the job search. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain competencies required by the phlebotomist.
    2. Identify traits of professionalism.
    3. Discuss all levels of governmental legislation and regulation as they apply to phlebotomy.
    4. Recognize and respond to verbal and non-verbal communications.
    5. Explain the importance of quality control related to blood collection.
    6. Write a resume.
    Listed Topics
    1. Job responsibilities
    2. Health care members
    3. Personal characteristics for professionalism
    4. National certification
    5. Employment opportunities
    6. Ethical and legal responsibilities
    7. Professional liability
    8. Interpersonal communication
    9. Patient with special needs
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks, internet sites, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search



Physical Science

  
  • PHS 101 - Earth Science


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This is a course which investigates the interrelationships of processes that occur on and within the earth. Concepts of physical science, ecology and geology are used to study environmental principles and issues of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and ecosphere.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Investigate principles and processes of physics, biology, chemistry, physical science and geology.
    2. Examine standard and alternative energy sources.
    3. Describe the properties of and the effects of pollution in air, land and water.
    4. Outline the relative relationship of global, community and personal health of air, land and water.
    5. Define the need for protection of global, community and personal health against pollution and hazardous waste materials.
    6. Apply concepts through laboratory experiments and field trips.
    Listed Topics
    1. Environment Problems: Past Present and Future
    2. Environmental Regulations
    3. Earth’s Minerals, Rocks, Structure and Plate Tectonics
    4. Solid Waste Disposal
    5. Ecosystems/Biotic and Abiotic Interactions
    6. Species Evolution and Geologic Time
    7. Populations
    8. Standard and Alternative Energy Sources
    9. Properties of Water and Pollution
    10. Sewage and Water Treatment
    11. Properties of Air, Air Pollution and Treatment
    12. Hazardous Materials
    13. Environment and Human Health
    14. Abatement Modes and Personal Protection Re: Air, Land, Water, Hazardous Materials and Noise Pollution
    Reference Materials
    Required Textbook; Reference Textbooks; Hazardous Materials Guidebooks; Magazines, Internet, Radio and Television Re: Environmental Problems and Solutions; Handouts; Computer Pollution Simulations; Slides; Video Tapes.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


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  • PHS 102 - Physical Science


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 090  

     
    Description
    An introduction to the fundamentals of physical science, including physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology, and geology. A knowledge of basic mathematics is required.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Distinguish natural sciences from physical sciences.
    2. List fundamental concepts that comprise physical sciences.
    3. Outline that each science embodies a way of thinking about nature.
    4. Explain many everyday phenomena through Physics, Astronomy, Meteorology, Chemistry and Geology.
    Listed Topics
    1. PHYSICS: Motion, Force of Nature, Energy and the Conservation of Energy, Electricity and Magnetism, Atomic Structure, Nuclear Structure, and Radioactivity
    2. ASTRONOMY: Earth and Moon, the Sun, the Solar System, Stellar Evolution, and Cosmology
    3. METEOROLOGY: Atmospheric Structure, Air Pressure and Temperature, Seasons, Climate Classification, Clouds, Precipitation, Weather Fronts, Cyclonic Storms
    4. CHEMISTRY: States of Matter, Periodic Table, Formation of Molecules
    5. GEOLOGY: Earth’s Interior, the Earth’s Crust, Plate Tectonics, Earthquakes, Volcanism, and Landforms
    Reference Materials
    Textbook; Handouts; Calculator
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHS 107 - Introductory Astronomy


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a descriptive introduction to astronomy, the scientific study of the contents of the entire Universe.  Students learn the physical processes that govern the nature and the behavior of various objects in space, as well as the methods astronomers use to understand them.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply scientific inquiry to the study of astronomy.
    2. Explain phenomena that can be observed in daytime and in the night sky.
    3. List the fundamental properties of objects in the solar system, stars and galaxies.
    4. Apply the basic principles and laws of physics to the Universe and its contents.
    5. Explain methods used by scientists to gather information and data in astronomy.
    Listed Topics
    1. The Celestial Sphere and the Night Sky
    2. Kepler’s Planetary Laws, Newton’s Laws of Motion and Gravity
    3. The Nature of Light and Telescopes
    4. Our Moon
    5. The Solar System: the Planets and their Moons, Asteroids, Comets and Dwarf Planets
    6. Our Sun
    7. The Formation, Evolution and Death of Stars
    8. The Milky Way and Other Galaxies
    9. Cosmology
    10. Other Solar Systems and Extra-terrestrial life
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHS 108 - Introduction to Weather


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a survey for both science and non-science majors on the basic concepts of weather. Topics include temperature, pressure, wind, humidity, cloud formation, precipitation, storms, weather maps and forecasting, and climate patterns.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. State the nature and general composition of the atmosphere, and name the atmospheric properties that are commonly measured, and describe how they are measured.
    2. Distinguish the different air masses, particularly those that affect the weather in the United States.
    3. Describe the different kinds of fronts and their associated characteristics.
    4. Explain the formation, characteristics and effects of thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.
    5. Describe the formation of rainbows and sundogs through atmospheric optics.
    6. Apply the basic principles and laws of physics to modeling weather events in forecasting and explain how weather data and forecasts are discriminated to the public.
    7. Discuss the natural causes of climatic changes, and explain how air and water pollutants affect global climates and local weather.
    Listed Topics
    1. The formation, structure, and composition of the atmosphere
    2. Temperature, pressure, heat, and humidity
    3. The seasons and isolation
    4. The hydrological cycle
    5. Pressure gradients and wind
    6. Cloud formation and precipitation
    7. Atmospheric optics: rainbows and sundogs
    8. Air masses, frontal boundaries, instabilities forming storms
    9. Violent storms: tornadoes and hurricanes and their effects
    10. Weather forecasting and broadcasting
    11. The major climates, historical changes in the climates due to continental movement, variations in the Earth’s orbit, and changes in the solar constant and changes due to atmospheric pollutants
    Reference Materials
    Textbook
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/02/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHS 161 - Physical Science for the Industries


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 080  or a score of 52 or higher on the College Placement Test for Math

     
    Description
    This is a basic course in the fundamentals of matter, its form, and properties. Matter is studied in terms of energy, power, and its changing environment. Addition topics include concepts of chemistry and their application to industrial usage.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Distinguish states: liquids, solids, gases and plasma.
    2. Describe fundamental states of matter.
    3. Know and apply Newton’s Law of Motion.
    4. Define basic principles of physics, such as kinematics, dynamics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, light, optics, and nuclear.
    5. Apply to industry the laws of matter involving sound, light, electricity and magnetism.
    Listed Topics
    1. States of Matter
    2. Kinematics, Dynamics, and Newton’s Law of Motion
    3. Work, Energy and Power
    4. Thermodynamics
    5. Electricity and Magnetism
    6. Light and Optics
    7. Acoustics
    8. Atomic and Nuclear Physics
    Reference Materials
    Textbook; Handouts; Calculator
    Approved By: Flores, Roy Date Approved: 10/15/2002


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  • PHS 406 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 6
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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Physical Therapist Assistant

  
  • PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapy


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Application and acceptance into PTA program and BIO 151  or BIO 161  or BIO 162  
    Co-requisites: BIO 160  and BIO 161  

    Description
    This is an introductory course on physical therapy and the roles of the physical therapist andphysical therapist assistant in the modern health care team. Topics include history, philosophy, theories of practice, definition of the profession, professional ethics, medical records, terminology, common disability groups treated, psychosocial aspects of physical disability, patient rights, and approaches to interacting with patients and their families. The laboratory portion of this course will include bandaging, wheelchair design and mobility, ambulation aides, assistive devices, basic patient transfers utilizing proper body mechanics, patient positioning, vital signs and architectural barriers encountered by handicapped persons. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services.
    2. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services.
    3. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members in the physical therapy profession.
    4. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe.
    5. Demonstrate competence in implementing selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist. Interventions include activities of daily living, assistive/adaptive devices, body mechanics, gait and locomotion training, wheelchair management, isolation techniques, sterile technique, and range of motion.
    6. Demonstrate competency in performing components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist.

    Interventions include:

    • measuring standard vital signs
    • recognizing and monitoring responses to positional changes and activities
    • recognizing the safety factors while using the device
    • describing the safety, status, and progression of patients while engaged in gait, locomotion, balance    wheelchair management and mobility
    • inspecting the physical environment and measuring physical space
    • recognizing safety and barriers in home, community, and work environments
    • recognizing level of functional status
    • recognizing cyanosis
    • recognizing activities that aggravate or relieve edema, pain, dyspnea, or other symptoms
    • describing chest wall expansion and excursion
    • describing cough and sputum characteristics.

       7. Demonstrate an awareness of social responsibility, citizenship, and advocacy, including participation in community service organizations and activities.

     Listed Topics

    1. Ambulation Aides
    2. Architectural Barriers
    3. Assistive Devices
    4. Bandaging
    5. Body Mechanics
    6. History of Physical Therapy
    7. Kinesiology
    8. Medical Vocabulary
    9. Patient Diversity
    10. Patient Draping & Positioning
    11. Range of Motion
    12. Self Help Devices
    13. Vital Signs
    14. Wheelchair Mobility
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. All textbooks for the PTA Program courses and reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


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  • PTA 102 - Physical Therapy Principles and Procedures 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 101  
    Co-requisites: PTA 103  and PTA 112C  

    Description
    Utilizing various teaching methods, including lab and lecture, this course provides an in-depth study of modalities and special techniques pertaining to the role of a physical therapist assistant. Specifically, the modalities portion of this course includes an extensive study of theory,setup, appropriate application, clean-up, indications, contradictions, precautions and safety procedures for modalities utilized by physical therapist assistants. These include moist heat, cryotherapy, ultrasound, whirlpool, paraffin baths, intermittent venous compression, cervical/pelvic traction, infrared, ultraviolet, electric stimulation and fluidotherapy. Special techniques that are taught include burn management, wound care, pulmonary hygiene, bandaging, postural assessment, therapeutic and transverse friction massage. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services.
    2. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members in the physical therapy profession.
    3. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe.
    4. Express (communicate) an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes.
    5. Demonstrate competence in implementing selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist. Interventions include therapeutic massage, thermal agents, compression therapies, cryotherapy, electrotherapeutic agents, hydrotherapy, superficial and deep thermal agents, traction, breathing exercises and coughing techniques, application and removal of dressing or agents, and identification of precautions for dressing removal.
    6. Demonstrate competency in performing components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist.

            Interventions include:

    • identification (observing) and monitoring of thoracoabdominal movements and breathing patterns with activity
    • measuring height, weight, length, and girth
    • recognizing normal or abnormal integumentary changes
    • recognizing activities, positioning and postures that aggravate or relieve pain or altered sensations, or that can produce associated skin trauma
    • recognizing viable vs. nonviable tissue
    • identifying (observing) the presence or absence of muscle mass
    • recognizing normal and abnormal muscle length
    • administration of standardized questionnaires, graphs, behavioral scales, or visual analog scales for pain
    • recognizing activities, positioning, and postures that aggravate or relieve pain or altered sensations
    • describing resting posture in any position
    • recognizing alignment of trunk and extremities at rest and during activities
    • administration of standardized questionnaires to patients and others.

        7.  Revise (adjust) interventions within the plan of care established by the physical therapist in response to patient clinical indications and report this to the supervising physical therapist.

        8.  Recognize when intervention should not be provided due to changes in the patient’s status and report this to the supervising physical therapist.

        9.  Participate in educating patients and caregivers as directed by the supervising physical therapist.

      10.  Demonstrate an awareness of social responsibility, citizenship and advocacy, including participation in  community service organizations and activities.

     Listed Topics

    1. Amputee Stump Wrapping
    2. Burn Management
    3. Cervical Traction
    4. Cryotherapy
    5. Electrical Stimulation
    6. Fluidotherapy
    7. Infrared
    8. Intermittent Venous Compression
    9. Iontophoresis
    10. Moist Heat
    11. Paraffin Bath
    12. Pelvic Traction
    13. Phonophoresis
    14. Postural Assessment
    15. Pulmonary Hygiene
    16. Therapeutic Massage
    17. Transverse Friction Massage
    18. Ultrasound
    19. Whirlpool
    20. Wound Care
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. All textbooks for the PTA Program courses and reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


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  • PTA 103 - Physical Therapy Principles and Procedures 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 101 , BIO 160 , BIO 161  
    Co-requisites: PTA 112C  and PTA 102  

    Description
    This course provides the physical therapist assistant student with an understanding of diagnoses and the physical therapy treatment methods used with people experiencing orthopedic and other problems that directly affect range of motion, strength, coordination, and endurance. Emphasis will be place on treatment concepts of orthopedic rehabilitation and therapeutic exercise. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    1. Express (communicate) both verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, healthcare delivery personnel, and others in an effective and appropriate manner.
    2. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy.
    3. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe.
    4. Express (communicate) an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes.
    5. Demonstrate competence in implementing selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist.

               Interventions include:

    • Functional Training
    • Manual Therapy Techniques
    • Therapeutic Exercise
    • Wound Management
    • Assistive, Adaptive, Orthotic, Protective, Supportive, and Prosthetic Devices
    • Gait, Locomotion, and Balance
    • Integumentary Integrity
    • Muscle Performance
    • Pain
    • Posture
    • Range of Motion

        6. Revise (adjust) interventions within the plan of care established by the physical therapist in response to patient clinical indications and report this to the supervising physical therapist.

        7. Recognize when intervention should not be provided due to changes in the patient’s status and report this to the supervising physical therapist.

        8. Report any changes in the patient’s status to the supervising physical therapist.

        9. Recognize when the direction to perform an intervention is beyond that which is appropriate for a physical therapist assistant and initiate clarification with the physical therapist.

      10. Participate in educating patients and caregivers as directed by the supervising physical therapist.

      11. Demonstrate (take) appropriate action in an emergency situation.

      12. Apply (complete) thorough, accurate, logical, concise, timely, and legible documentation that follow specific documentation formats and guidelines required by state practice acts, the practice setting, and other regulatory agencies.

      13. Review (read and understand) the health care literature.

     Listed Topics

    1. Aerobic Exercise
    2. Fracture Healing
    3. Fracture Types and Care
    4. Goniometry
    5. Home Programs
    6. Immobilization
    7. Kin-Com
    8. Manual Muscle Testing
    9. Normal Tissue
    10. Orthopedic Rehabilitation
    11. Osteoarthritis
    12. Prosthetics and Gait Training
    13. Range of Motion
    14. Scoliosis
    15. Soft Tissue Lesions
    16. Strength, Coordination and Endurance
    17. Stretching
    18. Surgeries
    19. Therapeutic Exercise
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. All textbooks for the PTA Program courses and reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


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  • PTA 112C - Introduction to Physical Therapy


    Credits: 1
    42 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 101 , BIO 161  
    Co-requisites: PTA 102 , PTA 103  

    Description
    This course provides the student with an introductory experience to physical therapy clinical education. The lecture portion of this course introduces the student to the roles and functions in physical therapy and responsibilities and relationships of physical therapy personnel. The clinical portion of this course provides the student with an opportunity to participate in physical therapist-directed activities commensurate with education level and experience. The faculty makes clinical education assignments, and students are responsible for their own transportation, parking and meals. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    The clinical education component of the comprehensive curriculum includes organized and sequential experiences coordinated with the didactic component of the curriculum. (Clinical education includes integrated experiences and full-time terminal experiences.) (3.3.3.1.) Clinical experiences selected by the program will provide students with appropriate role modeling and an opportunity to interact with individuals with impairments common to the clinical setting. (3.3.3.2.)

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Communicate verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, healthcare delivery personnel and others in an effective, appropriate and capable manner. (3.3.2.1.)
    2. Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services. (3.3.2.2.)
    3. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services. (3.3.2.3.)
    4. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy. (3.3.2.4.)
    5. Exhibit conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe. (3.3.2.5.)
    6. Communicate an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes. (3.3.2.6.)
    7. Take appropriate action in an emergency situation. (3.3.2.15.)
    8. Complete thorough, accurate, logical, concise, timely and legible documentation that follows guidelines and specific documentation formats required by state practice acts, the practice setting and other regulatory agencies. (3.3.2.16.)
    9. Participate in discharge planning and follow up as directed by the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.17.)
    10. Read and understand the health care literature. (3.3.2.18.)
    11. Educate others about the role of the physical therapist assistant. (3.3.2.20.)
    12. Interact with other members of the health care team in patient-care and non-patient care activities. (3.3.2.21.)
    13. Provide accurate and timely information for billing and reimbursement purposes. (3.3.2.22.)
    14. Describe aspects of organizational planning and operation of the physical therapy service (3.3.2.23.)
    15. Participate in performance improvement activities (Quality assurance). (3.3.2.24.)
    16. Demonstrate a commitment to meeting the needs of the patients and consumers. (3.3.2.25.)
    17. Recognize the role of the physical therapist assistant in the clinical education of physical therapist assistant students. (3.3.2.28.)
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient chart review
    2. Patient note writing
    3. Demonstration of appropriate student generic abilities
    4. Patient and healthcare personnel interaction
    5. Implementation of physical therapy treatment plan as appropriate in each setting and commensurate with student’s didactic training
    6. Participate in clinic specific opportunities and activities
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory committee. All textbooks for the (PTA) program courses and references materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


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  • PTA 201 - Physical Therapy Principles and Procedures 3


    Credits: 5
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 102  ,PTA 103 , PTA 112C , BIO 162  
    Co-requisites: PTA 202 , PTA 211C  

    Description
    An advanced study of physical therapy modality procedures for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), biofeedback, individual muscle and low volt electrical stimulation. Included is an in-depth study of the physical therapy management of spinal cord injuries, head trauma, hemiplegia, neuromuscular disease, and geriatric and pediatric patients. The role of physical therapy in the health-care arena is emphasized. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Express (communicate) both verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, healthcare delivery personnel, and others in an effective and appropriate manner.
    2. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy.
    3. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe.
    4. Express (communicate) an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes.
    5. Demonstrate competence in implementing selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist.

            Interventions include:

    • Functional Training
    • Manual Therapy Techniques
    • Physical Agents and Mechanical Agents
    • Therapeutic Exercise
    • Arousal, Mentation and Cognition
    • Assistive, Adaptive, Orthotic, Protective, Supportive and Prosthetic Devices
    • Gait, Locomotion, and Balance
    • Integumentary Integrity
    • Muscle Performance
    • Neuromotor Development
    • Pain
    • Posture

      6. Revise (adjust) interventions within the plan of care established by the physical therapist in response to patient clinical indications and report this to the supervising physical therapist.

      7. Recognize when intervention should not be provided due to changes in the patient’s status and report this to the supervising physical therapist.

      8. Report any changes in the patient’s status to the supervising physical therapist.

      9. Recognize when the direction to perform an intervention is beyond that which is appropriate for a physical therapist assistant and initiate clarification with the physical therapist.

    10. Participate in educating patients and caregivers as directed by the supervising physical therapist.

    11. Demonstrate (take) appropriate action in an emergency situation.

    12. Apply (complete) thorough, accurate, logical, concise, timely and legible documentation that follows specific documentation formats and guidelines required by state practice acts, the practice setting, and other regulatory agencies.

    13. Review (read and understand) the health care literature.

     Listed Topics

    1. Aphasia
    2. Cerebral Vascular Accident
    3. Chemical Neuroanatomy
    4. Control of Movement
    5. Electrical Stimulation
    6. Geriatric Patients
    7. Head Trauma
    8. Hemiplegia
    9. Language
    10. Neuroanatomy
    11. Neuromuscular Disease
    12. Normal Growth and Development
    13. Pediatric Patients
    14. Peripheral Nervous System
    15. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation
    16. Reflex Integration
    17. Rehabilitation Techniques
    18. Sensation/Reflex Testing
    19. Spinal Cord Injuries
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. All textbooks for the PTA Program courses and reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


    Course and Section Search


 

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