Apr 14, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Accounting

  
  • ACC 100 - Introduction to Accounting


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts, procedures and terminology of accounting. Students learn the basic principles of the accounting cycle such as analyzing transactions, journal entries, worksheets, adjustments and closing entries. Bank reconciliations and petty cash processes are reviewed. This course is aimed toward students who have not had previous exposure to accounting principles. Students who have passed ACC 104  or higher may not schedule this course. This course may not be taken concurrently with ACC 104 .
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define accounting terminology.
    2. Prepare entries in the general journal and the general ledger.
    3. Construct a worksheet.
    4. Generate financial statements including balance sheets and income statements.
    5. Reconcile bank statements to the general ledger’s cash account.
    6. Manage petty cash funds.
    Listed Topics
    1. The accounting equation
    2. Transactions using debits and credits
    3. General journal entries and general ledger
    4. Trial balance
    5. Worksheets and adjusting entries
    6. Financial statements such as balance sheets, income statements and statements of owner’s equity
    7. Closing entries and the post-closing trial balance
    8. Bank reconciliation
    9. Petty cash procedures
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 04/24/2020


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  • ACC 104 - Financial Accounting


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for MAT 090  or completion of ACC 100  with a C grade or higher.

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of financial accounting, including the preparation, interpretation and utilization of financial statement data. The basic principles and concepts governing the recording and reporting of accounting data, including the system of debits and credits will be covered. The course will also cover receivables, notes, inventory, depreciation, plant assets, current and long-term liabilities, as well as corporate accounting topics.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare financial statements.
    2. Determine the effects of business transactions on the elements of the financial statements.
    3. Measure, record and disclose assets, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, revenues and expenses.
    4. Perform basic financial statement analysis including making assessments of an entit’s liquidity, solvency and the adequacy of its profit.
    5. Define accounting terminology.

     Listed Topics

    1. Basic accounting equation
    2. Debits and credits
    3. Measuring income
    4. Adjusting and closing entries
    5. Financial statements
    6. Accounting cycle
    7. Accounting for service and merchandising transactions
    8. Cash and internal control
    9. Marketable securities
    10. Receivables
    11. Inventory
    12. Plant assets and depreciation
    13. Current and long-term liabilities
    14. Stockholders’ equity
       
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook and supplementary materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


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  • ACC 110 - Accounting Applications


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 104  

     
    Description
    The course emphasizes payroll preparation, record keeping and tax reporting, special journal preparation and posting, subsidiary ledger record keeping, and month-end and year-end summarizing and reporting. Students will learn to use manual and computerized accounting systems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Employ the use of specialized journals.
    2. Apply methods of payroll for a small or medium-size business.
    3. Develop reports for Federal, State and Local payroll taxes.
    4. Account for all entries in a manual practice set.
    5. Apply basic accounting knowledge to the completion of a computerized practice set.
    Listed Topics
    1. Specialized Journals
    2. Payroll Accounting
    3. Manual Accounting Systems
    4. Computerized Practice Set.
    5. Bank Statement Reconciliation
    6. Voucher System
    7. Petty Cash
    8. Stock Transactions
    9. Dividends
    10. Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
    11. Pennsylvania Sales and Use Taxes
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook and a manual or computerized Practice Set.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • ACC 120 - Computer Applications in Acctg


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 100  and ACC 104  

     
    Description
    A course which teaches the use of the computer as a tool for the accountant. Students learn practical and creative uses of an integrated general ledger package and spreadsheets as they are used by accountants. Emphasis is on linking accounting theory and practice.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Generate computerized journal entries.
    2. Generate computerized general ledgers.
    3. Use the computer to generate inventory, depreciation and payroll records.
    4. Explore, use and critique computerized accounting systems.
    5. Prepare computerized financial statements
    Listed Topics
    1. Use of computers in accounting
    2. Accounting cycle–Service Business
    3. Accounting cycle–Merchandising Business
    4. Computerized General Ledger procedures
    5. Inventory
    6. Maintain depreciation schedules
    7. Payroll
    8. Invoices

    Optional Topics

    1. Spreadsheets
    2. Survey of accounting software packages
    3. Tax software
    4. Financial statement analysis
    5. Accounting cycle-Manufacturing Operation
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook and software.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/24/2005


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  • ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 203  

     
    Description
    A study of GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) as related to financial statements. The course deals with current assets, liabilities, plant assets, and intangibles.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
    2. Analyze the effects of complex business transactions on the elements of the financial statements, primarily involving assets and the related expenses and revenues.
    3. Apply accounting principles, concepts, theory and assumptions to measure, record and disclose financial data in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
    4. Analyze the information presented on financial statements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Review of the accounting process
    2. Financial accounting environment
    3. Conceptual framework of accounting
    4. Financial statements
    5. Cash
    6. Receivables
    7. Inventories
    8. Plant and equipment
    9. Depreciation, depletion and impairments
    10. Intangible assets
    11. Present value and the time value of money
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


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  • ACC 202 - Intermediate Accounting 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 203  

     
    Description
    A comprehensive study of financial statements with emphasis on current and long-term liabilities, investments in corporate securities and owner’s equity. Additional topics include leases, pensions, tax allocation changes in accounting principles and cash flow statements.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
    2. Analyze the effects of complex business transactions on the elements of the financial statements, primarily involving liabilities, stockholder’ equity, revenues and expenses.
    3. Apply accounting principles, concepts, theory and assumptions to measure, record and disclose financial data in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
    4. Analyze the information presented on financial statements.
    Listed Topics
        Mandatory Topics:

    1. Current liabilities
    2. Long-term liabilities
    3. Investments
    4. Stockholders’ equity
    5. Cash flow statement
    6. Pensions
    7. Leases
    8. Earnings per share
    9. Accounting for income taxes
    10. Revenue recognition
    11. Accounting changes

        Optional Topics:

    1. Financial statement analysis
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.

    Optional:
    Wall Street Journal, Journal of Accountancy, FASB Statements, Statements of Financial Accounting Concepts, APB Statements, Other accounting and business periodicals.


    Approved By: Lauth, Laurence Date Approved: 01/17/1983


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  • ACC 203 - Managerial Accounting


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 104  

     
    Description
    Utilization of accounting information for purpose of managerial control and decision-making. Topics include an analysis of financial statements and accounting reports, cash flow analysis, cost- volume-profit analysis, cost accounting concepts, and budgeting as tools for planning control.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate financial information from a managerial viewpoint.
    2. Utilize cost-related information in designing a cost control system.
    3. Prepare and analyze budget information.
    4. Prepare and interpret cash flow statements.
    5. Interpret information gained when analyzing financial statements.
    6. Perform various cost-volume-profit analysis including breakeven analysis.
    Listed Topics
    SPECIFIC LEARNING OUTCOMES:
    Students will be able to:

    1. Evaluate financial information from a managerial viewpoint.
    2. Utilize cost-related information in designing a cost control system.
    3. Prepare and analyze budget information.
    4. Prepare and interpret cash flow statements.
    5. Interpret information gained when analyzing financial statements.
    6. Perform various cost-volume-profit analysis including breakeven analysis.

    PLANNED SEQUENCE OF TOPICS OR LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
        Mandatory Topics:

    1. Cost-volume-profit analysis
    2. Budgets
    3. Variances
    4. Managerial accounting concepts
    5. Principles and terminology
    6. Job order cost system
    7. Process cost system
    8. Cash flow statement
    9. Ratio analysis
    10. Capital investment analysis (discounted cash flows)
    11. Differential analysis

       Optional Topics:

    1. Product Pricing
    2. Just In Time Inventory
    3. Activity-Based Costing
    4. Economic Order Quantities
    5. Decentralized Operations
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.

    Optional:
    Wall Street Journal, Journal of Accountancy, Value Line, Moody Industrial, Standard and Poors,
    and other Accounting and Business periodicals


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


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  • ACC 204 - Cost Accounting


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 203  

     
    Description
    This course covers the basic techniques and procedures used in cost determination. Performance measurements, standard cost, job order methods, cost analysis and control are studied as management tools.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Name, explain and apply the types of cost accounting systems used in manufacturing and non-manufacturing operations.
    2. Demonstrate and illustrate the steps and related accounting entries and reports used in accumulating cost accounting data in job order and process cost accounting systems, as well as Activities-Based and Standard costing systems.
    3. Analyze and apply the methods and procedures used to budget and control costs in manufacturing and non-manufacturing companies to assess, judge and support relevant and family represented outcomes.
    4. Set up the steps in decision-making processes and apply these steps to solve manufacturing and non-manufacturing related business situations.
    5. Construct and analyze production reports to include required estimates and defense of any necessary judgments.
    6. Employ and illustrate capital budgeting as a management tool.
    Listed Topics
    1. Importance of cost information
    2. Basic cost flows and concepts
    3. Job order cost cycle
    4. Process cost systems
    5. Budgeting
    6. Standard costs
    7. Cost-Volume-Profit analysis
    8. Relevant cost and decision-making
    9. Production reports
    10. Capital budgeting
    11. Additional optional topics per individual instructors’ outlines
    Reference Materials
    Current Textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as working papers, study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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  • ACC 210 - Payroll and Tax Accounting


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a survey of taxing practices as they affect individuals, partnerships and corporations. Emphasis is on payroll and income taxes at state and federal levels.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Calculate gross pay under a variety of compensation methods.
    2. Determine the amount of taxes to withhold from gross pay.
    3. Determine the amount of employer’s payroll taxes.
    4. Complete various Federal and Pennsylvania State payroll tax reports.
    5. Maintain a payroll register and employee earning records.
    6. Apply the major provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act that affect minimum wages and overtime.
    7. Complete Federal and State personal income tax returns involving the commonly-experienced situations regarding gross income, adjustments, deductions, credits and additional taxes.
    8. Complete Schedules C and SE and other forms related to the tax consequences of operating a sole proprietorship.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic tax issues associated with partnerships, corporations, and S corporations, including their impact, if any, on the personal tax returns of the owners.
    Listed Topics
    1. The need for payroll and personnel records
    2. Computing and paying wages and salaries
    3. Social security taxes
    4. Withholding for income taxes
    5. Unemployment compensation taxes
    6. Overview of income taxes
    7. Dependents and filing status
    8. Gross income inclusions
    9. Adjustments to income
    10. Itemized deductions
    11. Tax credits
    12. Self-employed taxpayers
    13. Depreciation and cost recovery
    14. Rental activities
    15. Gains and losses
    16. Partnerships
    17. Corporations
    Reference Materials
    A current income tax text which should include numerous problems requiring the student to complete tax forms.
    A current payroll tax text containing problems requiring the completion of payroll tax forms.
    The instructor should provide PA and Local Tax forms and instructions for completion.
    The instructor should provide problems requiring the student to complete tax returns from tax documents such a W-2’s, 1099’s, 1098’s, etc.
    The instructor may wish to demonstrate income tax software.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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  • ACC 211 - Principles of Tax 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 104  

     
    Description
    This course provides an analysis of the federal income tax structure and procedures. The emphasis is on the federal law as it applies to individuals.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate and apply the individual knowledge of income tax law and the accounting component required to analyze and classify tax information for tax form preparation.
    2. Explain the knowledge of the individual tax law through the ability to interpret, practice, discriminate, design, appraise, argue, assess and defend judgments that require interpretations of current tax regulations.
    3. Apply special tax computation methods that represent a small percentage of tax payers.
    4. Choose from alternative tax law regulations and appraise, argue, assess and defend choices made based on professional judgment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction and basic tax model
    2. Working with the tax law
    3. Tax determination; personal and dependency exemptions
    4. Gross income
    5. Gross income: exclusions
    6. Capital gains and losses
    7. Deductions and losses: certain business expenses and losses
    8. Depreciation, cost recovery, amortization and depletion
    9. Deductions: employee expenses
    10. Deductions and losses: certain itemized deductions
    11. Optional Topics: Alternative minimum tax
    12. Tax credits and payment procedures
    13. Property transactions
    14. Deferred compensation
    15. Introduction and overview of tax preparation software
    16. Overview of partnerships and corporations
    17. Other additional topics per individual instructors’ course outlines
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook
    Supplementary materials
    Library Resources
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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  • ACC 215 - Fundamentals of Oil & Gas Accounting


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 104  

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the fundamental accounting concepts, procedures and terminology related to the various phases of oil and gas operations. Topics include accounting for exploration, acquisition and development costs, calculating depreciation, depletion and amortization, recording revenue from production activities and learning basic tax accounting for the oil and gas industry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define terminology related to the oil and gas industry.
    2. Demonstrate accounting for exploration, acquisition and development costs.
    3. Calculate depreciation, depletion and amortization.
    4. Evaluate revenues from production activities.
    5. Explain basic tax laws applicable to oil and gas accounting.
    Listed Topics
    1. Oil and gas operations
    2. Exploration costs
    3. Acquisition costs
    4. Drilling and development costs
    5. Depreciation, depletion, and amortization calculations
    6. Asset retirement obligations
    7. Revenues from production activities
    8. Tax laws applicable to the oil and gas industry
       
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/03/2015


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  • ACC 221 - Principles of Tax 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 211  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ACC 211 , Principles of Tax 1. The Internal Revenue Code, Regulations, Rulings and other tax references are used in problem solving.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Memorize, name, order and recognize all necessary tax law regulations necessary to prepare non-individual entity tax returns.
    2. Identify, express and explain law choices intended to satisfy tax regulations and tax law.
    3. Choose and apply the cross-referencing symbols of the IRS Code to assure a complete appraisal of needed tax law.
    4. Utilize the Internal Revenue Tax Code to appraise, argue, assess and defend choices for non-individual tax return.
    5. Research problems using the Federal Income Tax regulations and the Code.
    6. Choose, assess, compare and argue in defense of tax law needed to prepare a corporate tax return , form 1120.
    7. Choose, assess, compare and argue in defense of tax law needed to prepare a federal gift return.
    8. Choose, assess, compare and argue in defense of tax law needed to prepare a U.S. estate tax return.
    Listed Topics
    1. Partnerships
    2. Subchapter S
    3. Corporate tax returns
    4. Gift taxes
    5. Estate taxes
    6. Family tax planning, and other primarily non-individual tax forms
    7. Fiduciaries
    Reference Materials
    Current choice of: Tax Textbook
        Additional texts include but are not limited to:

    1. Complete Internal Revenue Code
    2. Federal Income Tax Regulations
    3. Income Tax Fundamentals
    4. U.S. Master Tax Guide
    5. Your Personal Income Tax Publication 17
    6. Guide to Small Business Publication 334
    7. Appropriate software

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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  • ACC 225 - Auditing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 202  

     
    Description
    This course introduces intermediate level auditing studies to accounting students possessing no previous auditing experience. Emphasis is placed on a conceptual understanding of auditing principles required to successfully apply auditing procedures and methods to enable the expression of opinions on the fair presentation of required financial statements. Explanations of how concepts are applied in the practice, procedures and policies of the auditing profession are presented. Emphasis is placed heavily on the practice of auditing procedures for both traditional and current areas of interest with the objective of successful completion of the auditing section of the national Certified Public Accountants (CPA) examination, as well as the continued advanced study of accounting for those not pursuing the public practice of accounting.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Execute the practices of the independent auditor in accordance with auditing standards.
    2. Apply basic auditing concepts and procedures that will result in successful audit and assurance services results.
    3. Discuss the relationships between audit evidence, materiality and audit risks.
    4. Identify risks within the audited entity system and related environment.
    5. Recognize the audited entity’s internal control workings.
    6. Distinguish between the interrelationships of auditing and accounting.
    7. Implement the rules of the organizations with oversight of the Auditing profession.
    8. Research all available literature to identify, interpret and apply the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants (
    Listed Topics
    1. Auditing
    2. The audit planning process
    3. Internal controls
    4. Auditing the revenue business process
    5. Audit evidence and the auditor’s responsibility for fraud detection
    6. Auditing the acquisition and expenditure business process
    7. Auditing the inventory business process
    8. Audit sampling:Tests of internal controls
    9. Audit sampling: Substantive tests of details
    10. Cash and investment business processes
    11. Long-term debt and owner’s equity business processes
    12. Completing the audit
    13. Audit reports
    14. The auditing profession
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved materials
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/03/2015


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  • ACC 230 - Advanced Accounting


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ACC 202  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to accounting topics aligned with the Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification (FASB ASC). The focus is on business combinations which provide the basic knowledge necessary to successfully complete the Certified Public Accountants (CPA) examination. Accounting for derivatives, foreign currency transactions and translations and international reporting standards are included. Additional topics include partnerships, governmentals, antitrust considerations, not-for-profits, variable interest entities, fair value accounting and estates and trusts.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare basic consolidated financial statements as required under varying factual situations.
    2. Translate foreign currencies as necessary on an interim and year-end basis for the reporting entity.
    3. Determine appropriate choices as to which form of business combination is best, given existing factual circumstances.
    4. Apply appropriate U.S. and international accounting standards to covered organizational entities.
    5. Discuss how global economies affect applications of financial accounting standards.
    6. Apply appropriate accounting procedures given the entity considered.
    7. Distinguish differences and consistencies in the application of U.S. and international accounting standards.
    8. Determine the distinction between mergers and consolidations.
    9. Determine when antitrust considerations adversely affect proposed transactions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Business combinations, stock investments
    2. Consolidated financial statements
    3. Intercompany profit transactions
    4. Consolidations
    5. Indirect and mutual holdings
    6. Subsidiary preferred stock, consolidated earnings per share (EPS), consolidated income taxation
    7. Consolidation theories, push-down accounting and corporate joint ventures
    8. Derivatives and foreign currency
    9. Accounting derivative and hedging activities
    10. Partnerships formation, operation, ownership, interest changes and liquidation
    11. Corporate liquidations and reorganization
    12. Accounting for state and local governments
    13. State and local government units
    14. Accounting for not-for-profits
       
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/03/2015


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Allied Health

  
  • ALH 102 - Basic Emergency Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A course to provide the knowledge and skills to manage an emergency situation that involves personal injury and/or sudden illness. Upon completion of the course, the student will receive certification for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from the American Heart Association and Advanced First Aid and Personal Safety from the American Red Cross.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Respond to breathing emergencies and obstructed airway emergencies.
    2. Respond to bleeding and shock emergencies.
    3. Respond to soft tissue and musculoskeletal emergencies. Respond to head and spine emergencies.
    4. Respond to poisoning, heat and cold emergenCies.
    5. Perform infant and adult CPR.
    6. Live a healthier lifestyle.
    Listed Topics
    1. Responding to Emergencies
    2. Body Systems
    3. Breathing Emergencies
    4. Obstructed Airway
    5. Adult CPR
    6. Infant and Child CPR
    7. Professional Rescuer CPR
    8. Bleeding and Shock
    9. Soft Tissue and Musculoskeletal
    10. Head and Spine Injuries
    11. Specific Injuries
    12. Poisoning
    13. Heat & Cold Exposures
    14. Moving Victims
    15. Healthier Lifestyles
    Reference Materials
    Text:  Responding to Emergencies, American Red Cross/ Mosby Lifeline.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/13/1997


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  • ALH 106 - Basic Life Support


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course in Basic Life Support (BLS)for Health Care Providers includes background information about heart disease, risk factors, prudent heart living and heart and lung function. One- and two-rescuer adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), foreign body airway obstruction management, and pediatric resuscitation are also taught. Students receive certification from the American Heart Association. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List background information on cardio-respiratory anatomy and physiology under normal dysfunction periods.
    2. Identify principles of primary prevention for cardiovascular disease including risk factors and prudent heart living.
    3. Explain secondary prevention principles including and recognizing signs of heart attack and actions for survival.
    4. Demonstrate the following skills according to the AHA guidelines: (a) Adult one-and two rescuer CPR (b) Bag-mask and mouth-to-mask ventilation (c) Adult foreign body airway obstruction (FBAO) management (d) Use of Automated External Defibrillator (AED) (e) Infant one-rescuer CPR (f) Infant FBAO management (g) Child one-rescuer CPR (h) Child FBAO.
    5. Demonstrate competency by scoring a minimum of 84% in written evaluations.
    6. Achieve certification in BLS for Healthcare Providers from the AHA.
    Listed Topics
    1. Adult BLS
    2. Health and lung structure and function
    3. Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)
    4. Technical aspects of one-rescuer CPR
    5. Adult FBAO management
    6. Adult two-rescuer CPR
    7. Barrier devices/cricoid pressure/special techniques
    8. AED
    9. Pediatric BLS
    10. Prevention of respiratory and cardiac arrest in infants and children
    Reference Materials
    BLS for Healthcare Providers by the AHA.
    Disposable adult and infant facemasks.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2014


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  • ALH 109 - Infection Control


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will provide the student with the basic concepts regarding infection control, the use of standard precautions, and the understanding of an exposure control plan.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Understanding of pathogens and nosocomial hospital related infections.
    2. Understanding and use of exposure prevention strategies.
    3. Analyze an exposure control plan.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pathogens/Nosocomial Infection
    2. OSHA Guidelines
    3. Pennsylvania Act 148
    4. Exposure Control Plan
    Reference Materials
    Bloodborne Pathogens -National Safety Council
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 08/24/1998


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  • ALH 125 - Pharmacology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 103 , BIO 161  and BIO 162  
     
    Description
    This course is designed for the Nursing/Allied Health student to acquire comprehensive knowledge of pharmacotherapeutic agents in clinical use. A body systems approach will be utilized. Drug classification, mechanism of action, therapeutic effects, generic equivalents and implications of administration will be emphasized.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss pharmacologic fundamentals (e.g. pharmacokinetics, pharmacotherapeutics) of drugs affecting various body systems.
    2. Recognize her/his role in the application of pharmacologic principles.
    3. Synthesize knowledge of pharmacology in the practice of patient care to promote, restore and maintain health.
    Listed Topics
    1. General Concepts
    2. Basic Principles of Pharmacology
    3. Drugs Affecting the Autonomic Nervous System
    4. Drugs Affecting the Central Nervous System
    5. Drugs Affecting the Cardiovascular System
    6. Drugs Affecting the UrinarySystem
    7. Antihypertensives
    8. Drugs Affecting the Endocrine System
    9. Drugs Affecting the Digestive and Respiratory Systems
    10. Anti Infectives
    11. Cancer Chemotherapy
    Reference Materials
    Lehne, R. (1994). PharmacoloQY, Philadelphia, Saunders,
    Pharmacology Packet-CCAC Bookstore
    1998 Drug Reference
    McCaffery, M., Beebe, A., (1989). Pain: Clinical manual for nursina practice, St. Louis, Mosby.
    Approved By: Lauth, Larence Date Approved: 01/17/1983


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  • ALH 140 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a basic study of the professional language of medicine. It is designed to include word construction, pronunciation, spelling, definition and use of terms related to all areas of medical science, hospital service and health related professions. This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of anatomy, pathology, surgical procedures, diagnostic procedures and symptomatology.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define a medical term by dividing it into its elements, identifying and defining each part.
    2. Correctly spell, pronounce and define medical terms applicable to anatomy, physiology, pathology, procedures and symptomatology.
    3. Use frequently encountered abbreviations in the health field.
    4. Convert medical terms into lay terminology, as well as convert lay terms into medical terminology.
    5. Translate medical vocabulary in professional application situations such as oral and written communication.
    Listed Topics
    1. Roots, suffixes and prefixes
    2. Terms pertaining to the body as a whole
    3. Musculoskeletal system
    4. Skin
    5. Nervous system
    6. Sensory system
    7. Cardiovascular system
    8. Respiratory system
    9. Blood system
    10. Lymphatic and immune system
    11. Digestive system
    12. Urinary system
    13. Reproductive system
    14. Pharmacology
    15. Endocrine system
    16. Cancer medicine
    17. Radiology and nuclear medicine
    18. Pharmacology
    Reference Materials
    Text book as determined by instructor.
    Medical Dictionary
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2014


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  • ALH 216 - Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Students must be healthcare providers with current Basic Life Support (BLS) Healthcare Provider certification (either American Heart Association, American Red Cross or recognized equivalent) who participate in the treatment of  cardiopulmonary arrest or other cardiovascular emergencies. Students must be able to successfully demonstrate competency in adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) use and bag-mask ventilation.

     
    Description
    This course in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) for Healthcare Providers includes evidence based information regarding recognizing and intervening in cardiac arrest, immediate post-cardiac arrest, acute arrhythmia, stroke and acute coronary syndromes (ACS) situations. Students will receive instruction regarding basic cardiac rhythm recognition, obtaining vascular access and the placement of alternative advanced airway devices. This course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice and demonstrate proficieny in the following skills used in resuscitation: systematic patient care approach, high-quality BLS, airway management, rhythm recognition, defibrillation, intravenous and  intraosseous access, medication use, cardioversion, transcutaneous pacing and team dynamics. Students receive certification from the American Heart Association (AHA).


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply the BLS, Primary and Secondary Assessments sequence for a systematicevaluation of adult patients.
    2. Perform prompt, high-quality BLS, including prioritizing early chest compressionsand integrating early automated external defibrillator (AED) use.
    3. Identify and perform early management of respiratory arrest.
    4. Identify dysrhythmias that may result in cardiac arrest or complicate resuscitationoutcome.
    5. Perform early management of cardiac arrest until termination of resuscitation ortransfer of care, including immediate post-cardiac arrest care.
    6. Perform early management of cardiac arrest through continuous assessment of CPR quality, monitoring the patient’s physiologic response and deliver real-time feedback to the resuscitation team.
    7. Demonstrate effective communication as a member or leader of a high-performance team.
    8. Describe the use of a rapid response team or medical emergency team to improve patient outcome.
    Listed Topics
    1. High-quality BLS
    2. Airway management
    3. Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS)
    4. Acute stroke
    5. Cardiac arrest
    6. Cardiac rhythm recognition
    7. Immediate post-cardiac arrest care
    8. Team dynamics
    9. Megacode
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook, laboratory simulation devices, etc.


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  • ALH 221 - EKG Application and Advanced Cardiac Resuscitation


    Credits: 2
    2 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Students must be healthcare providers with current Basic Life Support (BLS) Healthcare Provider certification (either American Heart Association, American Red Cross or recognized equivalent) who participate in the treatment of cardiopulmonary arrest or other cardiovascular emergencies. Students must be able to successfully demonstrate competency in adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) use and bag-mask ventilation.

     
    Description
    This course in electrocardiography (EKG) application and advanced cardiac resuscitation includes evidence-based information regarding recognizing and intervening in cardiac arrest, immediate post-cardiac arrest, acute arrhythmia, stroke and acute coronary syndrome situations.  Students receive instruction regarding basic cardiac rhythm recognition, obtaining vascular access and the placement of alternative advanced airway devices. This course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice and demonstrate proficieny in the following skills used in resuscitation: systematic patient care approach, high-quality Basic Life Support (BLS), airway management, rhythm recognition, defibrillation, intravenous and intraosseous access, medication use, cardioversion, transcutaneous pacing and team dynamics. Students successfully completing this course receive certification from the American Heart Association (AHA) in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS).


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply the BLS, Primary and Secondary Assessments sequence for a systematic evaluation of adult patients.
    2. Perform prompt, high-quality BLS, including prioritizing early chest compressions and integrating early automated external defibrillator (AED) use.
    3. Perform early management of respiratory arrest.
    4. Identify dysrhythmias that may result in cardiac arrest or complicate resuscitation outcome.
    5. Perform early management of cardiac arrest until termination of resuscitation or transfer of care, including immediate post-cardiac arrest care.
    6. Perform early management of cardiac arrest through continuous assessment of CPR quality, monitoring the patient’s physiologic response and deliver real-time feedback to the resuscitation team.
    7. Demonstrate effective communication as a member or leader of a high-performance team.
    8. Describe the use of a rapid response team or medical emergency team to improve patient outcome.
    Listed Topics
    1. High-quality BLS
    2. Airway management
    3. Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS)
    4. Acute stroke
    5. Cardiac arrest
    6. Cardiac rhythm recognition
    7. Immediate post-cardiac arrest care
    8. Team dynamics
    Reference Materials
    Advance Cardiac Life Support Provider Manual by the American Heart Association
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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American Sign Language & Culture

  
  • ASL 101 - Elem American Sign Language 1


    Credits: 4
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course develops the basic skills of receiving and expressing American Sign Language. Class participation includes exercises in articulation, reception, translation, grammatical patterns and description of objects and events.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language by receiving and expressing basic commands and questions.
    2. Make introductions, gain conversational attention and clarify information using American Sign Language.
    3. Employ a receptive vocabulary of no less than 850 items and an expressive vocabulary of no less than 600 of those items.
    4. Examine ASL classifier meanings by discussing concepts, movement roots and hand shapes morphemes.
    5. Demonstrate receptive/expressive forms in sign, written in the grammatical structure American Sign Language GLOSS.
    6. Identify each mouthing meaning and distinguish functions.
    7. List signs that are typically combined with each mouthing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Language in Action Segments of Signing Naturally Level 1
    2. Digital Movies in American Sign Language
    3. Hand Shape Stories and ABC Stories
    4. Live Event Narratives, Skit Dialogues
    5. Facial Expressions, Finger spelling, Parameters
    6. American Sign Language Structure (OSV, Syntactic, Pragmatics) Classifiers, Role Shifting, Signing Speed, Mouthing, Numbering and Signing Space
    7. American Sign Language GLOSS—Object-Subject-Verb (OSV)
    8. Basic OSV, Topicalization
    9. American Sign Language Classifier Structures
    10. Receptive and Expressive Parameters: Hand Shapes, Location, Movements and Palm Orientations
    11. Movement Roots: Stative-Descriptive, Process and Contact
    12. Hand Shape Morphemes: Whole-Entity, Surface, Instrument, Dimensions, On-Surface
    13. Mouthing Meanings
    Reference Materials
    Instructor Text and Reference Guide.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • ASL 102 - Elementary American Sign Language 2


    Credits: 4
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ASL 101  or permission of the instructor

     
    Description
    This course continues to develop the basic expressive and receptive skills of American Sign Language (ASL). Class participation includes exercises in articulation, reception, translation, grammatical patterns and description of objects and events.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate comprehension and production skills in ASL in conversational discourse.
    2. Utilize appropriate descriptions of physical environments using classifier productions in ASL in describing and discussing objects or activities.
    3. Employ increased receptive vocabulary competency and expressive language competency through concept discussion and signing in the classroom.
    4. Generate ASL classifiers appropriately in concepts, movement roots and handshape morphemes.
    5. Practice receptive and expressive skills in sign and written format using the grammatical structure ASL gloss.
    6. Apply mouthing techniques and distinguish meanings and/or functions.
    7. List signs that are typically combined with each mouth morpheme.
    Listed Topics
    1. Handshapes, storytelling, narratives, skit dialogues
    2. ASL structure (OSV, syntactics, pragmatics)
    3. Classifiers, role shifting, signing speed, mouthing, numbering and signing space
    4. Getting, directing and maintaining conversational attention
    5. Translation and performance of a children’s storybook
    6. Movement root: stative‐descriptive, process and contact
    7. Handshape morphemes: whole‐entity, surface, instrument, dimensions, on‐surface
    8. Production of phonology
    9. Morphology (Object‐Subject‐Verb [OSV] agreement) classifiers, pronouns
    10. Temporal aspect, numerical incorporation and time markings
    11. Topicalization, Yes/No questions, WH questions, rhetorical questions, conditionals, negations, affirmations and commands
    12. Giving directions, describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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  • ASL 104 - Visual Gestural Communication


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    Visual Gestural Communication (VGC) provides a means of bypassing vocabulary and strict grammar rules of a language and aiming directly at other very important components of effective communication. These include 1)cohesion-the sequencing of relevant pieces of communication so that they hang together and “make sense”, 2)monologic discourse - the rules of building sequences to a point of climax and resolution in narratives; 3)dialogic discourse - the rules of turn taking and interrupting in dialogic discourse; 4)stylistics - the confidence, character and personality expressed while communicating. All four of these variables are essential for fluent language use and can be practiced via VGC, even though VGC is not itself a language.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the difference between gestures and signs.
    2. Demonstrate receptive comprehension of gestural information.
    3. Demonstrate expressive production of gestural information.
    4. Produce the five variables required in using gestural information:
    •  fluency in the pacing and overall flow of the presentation,
    •  clear articulation of gesture choices,
    •  appropriate choice of gestures and sequencing,
    •  appropriate use of posture and physical space,
    •  confidence and performance of all tasks
    Listed Topics
    1. Review of the difference between gestures and signs
    2. Productive practice of gestures in isolation
    3. Receptive practice of gestures in isolation
    4. Productive practice of gestures in context
    5. Receptive practice of gestures in context
    Reference Materials
    Various Handouts; Instructional Materials Supplied by Instructor; CD or DVD or VHS.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/25/2007


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  • ASL 109 - Deaf Culture


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ASL 101  

     
    Description
    The Deaf community is a complex and diverse community with a rich heritage and prosperous future. This course focuses on three aspects of the deaf community and culture: 1) historical perspectives and cultural norms within the Deaf community, 2) diversity within the Deaf community and 3) artistic expression and humor.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an ability to compare and understand middle class American values, beliefs and institutions with those of the deaf community in the United States.
    2. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of American Deaf culture through lectures presented in American Sign Language.
    3. Identify deaf national and international organizations and events.
    4. Rehearse and perform in a play (in American Sign language) which incorporates various aspects of American Deaf culture.
    5. Describe and compare Deaf culture in other countries with different perspectives.
    6. Identify three different aspects of diversity of Deaf people within the Deaf community.
    Listed Topics
    1. Deaf Culture and its characteristics, goals, values, and diversity within the Deaf community
    2. Humor within the American Deaf culture
    3. Deaf community and identification of various constituencies
    4. Roles in culture and how the interpreter is perceived by deaf and hearing people in cultural contexts
    5. Review of a play involving Deaf culture written by a Deaf playwright
    6. Translation of the above mentioned play into culturally appropriate ASL
    7. Rehearsal of the play and final public performance to students in other courses in ITP
    8. Focusing more on improving each student’s sign productions, facial expressions, signing space, and gestures
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, handouts and DVDs as approved by the instructor.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/25/2007


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  • ASL 201 - Intermediate American Sign Language 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ASL 102  or permission of the instructor.

     
    Description
    This course increases the students’ basic expressive and receptive skills of American Sign Language (ASL). Students study translations, grammatical patterns, cultural and literary materials, dialogues and conversational activities.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Comprehend signed discourse by responding appropriately to questions, following commands and retelling information in signed or written summary form.
    2. Produce signed discourse by describing the size, shape and movement of objects using classifiers, formulating and producing original ASL sentences in signed discourse, using targeted ASL vocabulary in signed discourse and employing targeted ASL grammatical structures and features in dialogue drills and translation exercises.
    3. Translate selected ASL English sentences and short texts into ASL.
    4. Produce sufficient fluency in dialogue drills and translation exercises.
    5. Identify the difference between gestures and signs.
    6. Produce intermediate receptive comprehension and expressive information.
    7. Produce the five variables in using gestural information: fluency, articulation of gesture, sequencing, posturing and performance.
    Listed Topics
    1. Grammatical rules and discourse strategies
    2. Semantic Awareness Tests
    3. Getting, directing and maintaining conversational attention
    4. Conversational pace
    5. Conversational use of ASL
    6. ASL demonstration
    7. Receptive and productive practices of gestures
       
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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  • ASL 202 - Intermediate American Sign Language 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ASL 201  or permission of the instructor.

     
    Description
    This course builds upon ASL 201  by increasing students’ skills of receiving and expressing American Sign Language (ASL). Students study translations, grammatical patterns, cultural and literary materials, dialogues and conversational activities. Students study components of visual gestural communication in this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Comprehend conversational discourse in ASL, including targeted ASL vocabulary, especially vocabulary related to the fields of sports, medicine, law and technology.
    2. Produce conversational discourse in ASL, including targeted ASL vocabulary, especially vocabulary related to the fields of sports, medicine, law and technology.
    3. Describe the size, shape and movement of a variety of objects using classifiers.
    4. Employ methods of conversation regulation for getting and maintaining attention, managing pace, interrupting and resuming conversations in ASL.
    5. Translate a children’s story written in third grade English into an ASL equivalent.
    6. Identify the difference between gestures and signs.
    7. Produce intermediate receptive comprehension and expressive gestural information.
    Listed Topics
    1. Grammatical rules and discourse strategies
    2. Semantic Awareness Tests
    3. Life event narratives, ABC and handshape stories
    4. ASL poetry and drama
    5. Obtaining, directing, and maintaining conversational attention
    6. Conversational use of ASL
    7. Vocabulary for sports, medicine, law and technology
    8. Translation
    9. ASL demonstration
    10. Receptive and productive gesture practices
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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  • ASL 209 - Advanced ASL & Cognitive Processing 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ASL 202  or admission to the Interpreter Training Program.

     
    Description
    This course, taught in American Sign Language (ASL), builds on material learned in ASL 202 , developing both comprehension and expression in ASL. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various intermediate-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Issues related to the effects of oppression and discrimination (e.g., audism, racism, sexism), the influence of power and privilege within multicultural and diverse populations, majority and minority culture dynamics, and dynamics of cross-cultural interaction will be explored. To advance to ASL 210 , the student must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply current expressive and receptive skills in ASL to discuss topics and expand their expressive skills in various topics and content areas in ASL discourse.
    2. Retell topics and content presented in ASL.
    3. Discuss in groups/pairs, with ASL users/guest speakers, issues related to the Deaf community and social justice.
    4. Utilize storytelling both expressively and receptively to identify new structures and vocabulary in ASL.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocabulary of finances
    2. Mouthing morphemes, depicting-noun verbs, and tokens
    3. Analyzing ASL discourse
    4. Idioms
    5. Deaf community
    6. Vocabulary of decision making
    7. Storytelling
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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  • ASL 210 - Advanced ASL & Cognitive Processing 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ASL 209 .

     
    Description
    This course, taught in American Sign Language (ASL), builds on material learned in ASL 209 , allowing students to develop advanced comprehension and expression in ASL. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and a variety of higher-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Issues of the effects of special populations within the Deaf community (Deaf-Blind, Intellectual & Developmental Disability (ID/DD), Mental Health) will be explored, as well as specialized and technical vocabulary for various settings (medical, mental health, sexual signs, signs of drug use, etc.)In addition, issues of social justice as they relate to the Deaf community will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Expand the usage of expressive skills in various topics and content areas in ASL discourse.
    2. Illustrate the elements of issues that affect special populations within the Deaf community.
    3. Analyze the usage of expressive skills (watching Deaf native signers) in various topics and content areas in ASL discourse.
    4. Develop skills to analyze language use of Deaf consumers and when it is appropriate to call a Certified Deaf Interpreter.
    5. Discussion in groups/pairs, with ASL users/guest speakers, issues related to the Deaf community and social justice.
    6. Complete assignments, video-presentation/research projects on ASL Discourse skills.
    Listed Topics
    1. ASL discourse
    2. International sign
    3. Medical, mental health, sexual and signs of drug use
    4. Legal / court considerations
    5. Discourse analysis: main idea, summarizing, lexical substitution, visual form and meaning and visualizations
    Reference Materials
    Various Handouts/Instructional Materials Supplied by the Instructor Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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Anesthesiology

  
  • ANE 110 - Basic Prin of Anesthesia Technology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    The course is an introduction to anesthesiology’s contribution to quality patient care and the relationship of the anesthesia technician to other healthcare professionals. The focus is on patient safety, universal precautions and employee safety in the healthcare environment. An introduction to the theory and concepts of a surgical environment is given including the fundamentals of a variety of anesthesia equipment and basic case set-up utilizing anesthesia supplies. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply theoretical concepts and techniques of anesthesia technology at the fundamental level for patients in the surgical environment.
    2. Examine the anesthesia technician role in the care of the surgical patient.
    3. Demonstrate a basic use of anesthesia equipment needed for a variety of surgical cases.
    4. Explain the proper basic anesthesia set-up for a variety of surgical cases.
    5. Describe the skills and techniques of an anesthesia technician in the surgical environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Role of certified anesthesia technician
    2. Standards of practice
    3. Anesthesia care team
    4. Universal precautions
    5. Surgical environment
    6. Basic monitoring
    7. Induction of anesthesia and intubation
    Reference Materials
     

     


    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/11/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ANE 111 - Basic Prin of Anesthesia Equipment


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Anesthesia Technician Program
     
    Description
    This course offers an introduction to the theories and concepts in the adequate function of anesthesia equipment including maintaining equipment, repairing defects and trouble-shooting complications. The student will be introduced to basic equipment used for patients while undergoing anesthesia, including airway equipment and hemodynamic monitoring. Introduction to point-of-care testing (POCT) will also be covered. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate skill in operating the basic anesthesia equipment appropriate for surgical procedures.
    2. Demonstrate skill in operating various types of airway equipment for simple types of Mallampati classifications and assist with basic intubations.
    3. Demonstrate skill in operating various types and usage for point-of-care testing equipment.
    4. Demonstrate skill in IV catheters including sizes and sampling sites.
    5. Demonstrate skill in capillary blood draws including sampling sites for bedside testing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Gas machine
    2. Monitors
    3. Laryngoscopes/blades
    4. Glucometer
    5. Hemacue
    6. Warming/cooling devices
    7. Intravenous catheters
    Reference Materials
    Class reading materials, practice use of anesthesia lab equipment
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/11/2015


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  • ANE 114 - Advanced Prin of Anesthesia Technology


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 110  and ANE 111  

     
    Description
    This course covers the theory and concepts of the use and function of anesthesia supplies and equipment used for various surgical procedures to include studies in general, regional and conscious sedations as well as patient positioning. Additional topics are types of anesthesia emergencies, including difficult airways, malignant hyperthermia, hemorrhage and cardiac arrest. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the proper procedure for room tear down and set up.
    2. Identify various types of anesthesia to be used for specific procedures.
    3. Explain various types of patient positioning to be used for specific procedures.
    4. Demonstrate competency in the use and care of emergency anesthesia equipment.
    5. Describe the identification and resolution of various emergency situations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of anesthesia: general, regional and sedation
    2. Patient positioning
    3. Room turnover
    4. Difficult airways
    5. Malignant hyperthermia
    6. Hemorrhage
    7. Cardiac arrest
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, online programs, videos and lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/26/2019


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  • ANE 116 - Advanced Anesthesia Equipment


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 110  and ANE 111  

     
    Description
    This course provides instruction and lab application to the theories and concepts of advanced anesthesia equipment that are used in complex anesthesia/surgical situations. Topics include invasive monitoring and high-level equipment: thromboelastograph, cell saver, transducers and transesophageal echocardiogram to properly assist with care of a high-risk patient. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate skill for the functions of the advanced anesthesia equipment appropriate for surgical procedures.
    2. Apply the concepts and techniques of the anesthesia technician in relation to adequate patient care.
    3. Demonstrate preparation for various high level procedures and emergencies that may arise in or around different anesthesia care locations.
    4. Demonstrate proper procedures to assist with management of unanticipated emergency.
    5. Describe cell salvage, concept and processing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Gas machine emergencies
    2. Pressure transducers
    3. Cardiac set-up
    4. Liver transplant set-up
    5. Trauma
    6. Invasive lines-equipment needed and assist with insertion
    7. Cell salvage
    8. Thromboelastograph
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, online programs, videos and lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 09/26/2019


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  • ANE 203C - Anesthesia Technology Clinical 1


    Credits: 3
    132 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 114   and ANE 116  
    Co-requisites: ANE 214  

    Description
    This clinical experience provides the student with the opportunity to observe and practice the principles of infection control in a surgical setting as well as gain experience with specific anesthesia equipment. The student will observe, obtain and practice specific technical skills. Hands-on experience will provide technical skills and further understanding of the theories taught within the classroom. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basic. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Obtain industry experience by working in the operating room environment.
    2. Display sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to the clinical site’s policies and procedures during all fieldwork-related activities.
    3. Identify the different types of anesthesia.
    4. Obtain basic knowledge of anesthesia equipment and basic troubleshooting.
    5. Assist with patient positioning, intubation and invasive line placements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Orientation to health care setting
    2. Anesthesia team functioning
    3. Professional behaviors
    4. Types of anesthesia
    5. Types of anesthesia equipment
    6. Patient care skills
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, online programs, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/26/2019


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  • ANE 214 - Anesthesia Pharmacology


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 114  and ANE 116  
    Co-requisites: CHM 109  

    Description
    This course covers the theory and concepts in the proper use and safe practice of delivery and storage of anesthesia medications. Drugs commonly used in the practice of anesthesia will be studied. Emphasis is placed on the proper identification of these drugs by trade and generic names, their basic pharmacological action, and how they are used in a clinical setting. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the differences of various categories of anesthetic and adjunct medications, brand and generic names.
    2. Describe the differences among various types of intravenous medications.
    3. Describe the differences among various types of inhalational medications.
    4. List the basic pharmacodynamics used in anesthesia medications.
    5. Describe the types of intravenous fluids and blood products necessary for homeostasis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of agents
    2. Barbiturates
    3. Muscle relaxants
    4. Inhalational
    5. Narcotics
    6. Anxiolytics
    7. Local anesthetics
    8. Cardiac drugs
    9. Reversal agents
    10. Antiemetics
    11. Parenteral agent
    12. Crystalloid
    13. Colloids
    14. Blood products
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, videos and online resources.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ANE 220 - Professional Issues for the Anesthesia Technologist


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 203C  and ANE 214  

     
    Description
    This course surveys the current trends in anesthesia technology. Emphasis is placed on professional issues such as continuing education, ethical behavior, team functioning and organization of health care institutions. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the role of the anesthesia technologist in health care institutions.
    2. State the importance of policies and procedures in work settings.
    3. Create a job resume and cover letter.
    4. List the steps in the credentialing process for an anesthesia technologist.
    5. Develop a professional development plan.
    Listed Topics
    1. Health care institutions
    2. Team functioning
    3. Professional development plan
    4. Credentialing process
    5. Resume writing
    6. Work policies and procedures
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, videos and online resources.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ANE 221C - Anesthesia Technology Clinical 2


    Credits: 5
    320 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 203C  

     
    Description
    This 8-week, full-time clinical experience takes place in diverse health care settings. This clinical experience will provide the student with the opportunity to observe and practice the entry level skills with specific anesthesia equipment. The student will observe, obtain and practice at an entry skill level. Hands-on experience will provide technical skills and further application of the theories taught within the classroom. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Anesthesia Clinical 2 must be successfully completed before beginning Anesthesia Clinical 3. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply industry experience by working in the operating room environment for more complex anesthesia situations.
    2. Develop professional skills that facilitate the job search process.
    3. Display sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to the clinical site’s policies and procedures during all fieldwork-related activities.
    4. Apply entry level skills with anesthesia equipment.
    5. Display skills to anticipate needs of the anesthesia care provider and assist to maintain optimal patient outcomes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Orientation to health care setting
    2. Aesthesia team functioning
    3. Professional behaviors
    4. Types of anesthesia
    5. Types of anesthesia equipment
    6. Patient care skills
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, online programs, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/26/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ANE 222C - Anesthesia Technology Clinical 3


    Credits: 5
    320 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: ANE 203C  

     
    Description
    This 8-week, full-time clinical experience takes place in diverse health care settings. This clinical experience will provide the student with the opportunity to observe and practice the entry level skills with specific anesthesia equipment. The student will observe, obtain and practice at an entry skill level. Hands-on experience will provide technical skills and further application of the theories taught within the classroom. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply industry experience by working in the operating room environment for more complex anesthesia situations.
    2. Develop professional skills that facilitate the job search process.
    3. Display sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to the clinical site’s policies and procedures during all fieldwork-related activities.
    4. Apply entry level skills with anesthesia equipment.
    5. Display skills to anticipate needs of the anesthesia care provider and assist to maintain optimal patient outcomes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Orientation to health care setting
    2. Aesthesia team functioning
    3. Professional behaviors
    4. Types of anesthesia
    5. Types of anesthesia equipment
    6. Patient care skills
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journal, online programs, videos and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/26/2019


    Course and Section Search



Anthropology

  
  • ANT 101 - Intro to Anthropology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a scientific inquiry into human variability across space and time. The evolution of humanity’s biocultural nature from prehistory to present times is examined. This draws upon evidence from archaeology, physical anthropology/ human paleontology, ethnography and linguistic anthropology.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe archaeology, ethnography, ethnology, linguistic anthropology, physical anthropology and primatology.
    2. Know the research methods and techniques employed in each of the aforementioned sub-areas.
    3. Describe the nature and interrelatedness of cultural evolution and biological evolution in the development over time, of human nature.
    4. Distinguish culture from society and to understand their interrelatedness.
    5. Analyze similarities and differences in human cultures and to effectively generalize about human nature
    Listed Topics
    1. Anthropology
    2. Archaeology
    3. Ethnography
    4. Ethnology
    5. Linguistic anthropology
    6. Physical anthropology
    7. Biological evolution
    8. Culture
    9. Cultural evolution
    10. Primates
    11. Early hominids
    12. Modern human and domestication of plants and animals
    13. Prehistory
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, scholarly readings, films, maps and electronic resources as assigned.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


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  • ANT 102 - Intro Cultural Anthropology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A study of the structure of human socio-cultural systems that emphasizes economy, kinship, political organization, social control, social stratification, belief systems, and language. The course deals with cultural variations among living populations of the present and recent past whose cultures have been described by ethnographic fieldworkers. Selected case studies are read, discussed and compared to stimulate a fuller appreciation of our common humanity.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define cultural anthropology and locate it within the context of general anthropology.
    2. Define culture and use this concept as an analytical tool.
    3. Describe the interrelationship of culture and human biology.
    4. Differentiate between ethnography and ethnology.
    5. Discuss goals, techniques, and problems of ethnographic field research.
    6. Compare and contrast selected ethnographic case studies.
    7. Describe and explain the process of socio-cultural evolution.
    Listed Topics
    1. General anthropology
    2. Cultural anthropology
    3. Culture
    4. Ethnography
    5. Ethnology
    6. Socio-cultural evolution
    Reference Materials
    Current text, ethnographic case studies, parallel reading, handouts, study guides, videotapes, films, computer-based learning resources, library resources and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • ANT 103 - Intro Physical Anthropology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of human biological variability across space and time. The course utilizes the analytical tools of evolution and ecological analysis to track the evolution of human nature across prehistory. Emphasis is placed on the interdependency of the logics of basic Mendelian genetics and of the Darwinian theory of natural selection. This framework is used to organize and interpret holistically evidence of human evolution drawn from human paleontology, prehistoric archeology and primatology.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. State the nature of physical anthropology understood within the context of general anthropology.
    2. Apply the tools of evolutionism and ecological analysis to the case of evolving human nature.
    3. Explain the sources of variability in inherited traits by applying Mendelian logic.
    4. Discuss specific cases the logic of Darwin’s theory of natural selection.
    5. Describe and explain the stages of human evolutionary development from prehistoric times down to recent times.
    6. Locate humanity within nature by applying evidence from primatology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Physical anthropology
    2. Human paleontology
    3. Evolution
    4. Ecology
    5. Natural selection
    6. Prehistory
    7. Primatology
    Reference Materials
    A textbook, parallel readings, videotapes and films, study guides, library resources and reference materials, lectures, and discussion.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ANT 104 - Native Amer-Indians of N. America


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an ethnographic survey of Native tribes of North America (north of Mexico) from Paleoindians to contemporary tribes/nations. Possible fieldtrips are part of this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify Native people’s ethnic communities and cultural traditions.
    2. Discuss commonalities amongst these groups.
    3. Discuss variation in adaptations to specific environments.
    4. Deconstruct stereotypical images.
    5. Analyze theories of prehistory and history of the Indian presence in the contiguous United States.
    6. Discuss the effects of American government policy on Native Americans.
    7. Discuss language.
    8. Discuss myths, rituals and religion.
    9. Discuss cultural exchange. e.g., literature, poetry, music and art
    10. Describe the Native American experience.
    11. Discuss contemporary issues of Native American people.
    Listed Topics
    1. History, ethnic identity and cultural traditions
    2. Native American origin stories
    3. Ancestors
    4. Indian-Non-Indian relations
    5. Native experiences, stereotypes and contemporary issues
    6. Current realities, fears and hopes
    7. Cultural contributions
    8. Commonalities between groups
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, scholarly readings, films, maps and electronic resources as assigned.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ANT 107 - Intro to Archaeology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to the goals and techniques of modern, scientific archaeology. Archaeology is the study of the human cultural past through the analysis of the material left behind by past societies. The course will survey world prehistory from the evolution of ancestral hominin species through the rise of ancient civilizations. The ethical, legal and political issues involved in conducting archaeology in the United States today will also be explored.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the primary goals of modern archaeology and the methods used by archaeologists to understand the past.
    2. Describe the origins of the human species and pre-agricultural adaptations.
    3. Assess the wide diversity of dietary, settlement, social, political, economic, technological and religious patterns exhibited by past cultures.
    4. Compare and contrast archaeological evidence of the development and characteristics of ancient complex societies in the Old and New worlds.
    5. Appraise the ethical, political and legal issues involved in conducting archaeological research.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scientific archaeology
    2. Archaeological data
    3. Fieldwork and excavation methods
    4. Site discovery
    5. Dating techniques
    6. Artifact analysis
    7. Hominin evolution
    8. Paleolithic adaptations
    9. Peopling of the New World
    10. Mesolithic/Archaic cultures
    11. Origins of domestication
    12. Ancient complex societies
    13. Ethics in archaeology
    Reference Materials
    Current textbooks, articles, videos, web-based activities, class discussions, research projects, library resources.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • ANT 110 - Forensic Anthropology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course offers an overview of the scope of modern forensic anthropology. Major areas covered include personal identification and legal consideration, search and recovery, interpretation of trauma and taphonomy, analytical techniques and applications of forensic anthropology. Case presentations will be utilized to demonstrate professional and ethical responsibilities, scientific rigor and the multidisciplinary approach of forensics. Please note this course does not satisfy the requirements for the CJC program.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the roles and methods of modern forensic anthropology.
    2. Utilize scientific methodology.
    3. Discuss the multidisciplinary nature of forensic science.
    4. Define skeletal biology and bio-archaeology.
    5. Describe medico-legal and ethical issues.
    6. Recognize the humanitarian issues for the victim/s and their families.
    Listed Topics
    1. Physical Anthropology
    2. Skeletal structure, growth and changes natural and traumatic
    3. Archaeological methods
    4. Forensic Science
    5. Forensic team roles and modern technology
    6. DNA, RNA, Wound Identification, Pre and post mortem trauma.
    7. Historical and contemporary medico-legal issues.
    8. Presentation of forensic findings in court.
    9. Growth of Forensic Anthropology
    10. Ethics in forensics
    Reference Materials
    Text books, Internet, Autopsies, readings, discussions.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • ANT 117 - Globalization


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of the causes and consequences of cultural change on a global scale.  Humanity has been a global species since its appearance on this planet.  However, the globalization in the twenty-first century has emerged to create new challenges, many of which are some of the most difficult in our species’ history.  This course examines world-wide changes in economies, environments and cultural patterns.  The course focuses on particular institutions, e.g. cultural models about labor, gender, religion, race, social class and violence, to better contextualize these transformations.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Differentiate the processes of cultural change on a global scale.
    2. Examine modern cultural diversity.
    3. Identify issues with so-called “development programs.”
    4. Formulate conclusions regarding the cultural impacts of climate change in non-western and western societies.
    5. Describe how cultural models regarding race, gender, class and religion affect cultural change.
    6. Identify multiple ways that expressive culture is used across societies as resistance and as conformity.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of globalization
    2. Expressive culture
    3. Gender
    4. Social class
    5. Ethnic conflict
    6. Religious change and revitalization
    7. Refugees
    8. Medical anthropology
    9. Applied anthropology
    10. Capitalism and colonialism
    11. Impact of technology
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, library databases, internet resources, recordings, tapes and films as appropriate.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/23/2020


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Arabic Language & Culture

  
  • ARA 101 - Elementary Arabic 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course develops the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing Arabic. Students will study Arab culture including religion, dress, food and everyday life. Class participation includes exercises in pronunciation, reading, dictation, translation and grammatical patterns.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate basic communication skills of the Arabic language (listening, speaking, reading and writing).
    2. Recognize the modern Arabic language standards used all around the world.
    3. Describe Arab cultures including religion, dress, food and everyday life.
    4. Recognize and comprehend Arabic messages and make use of learned vocabulary in replies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Arabic alphabet
    2. Vocabulary and sentence structure
    3. Different Arabic dialects
    4. Arab countries
    5. Arab cultures
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet, DVDs.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ARA 102 - Elementary Arabic 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ARA 101  or with permission of instructor.

     
    Description
    This course further develops a student’s knowledge and understanding of Arabic. Students will study Arab culture including religion, dress, food and everyday life. The course includes advanced communication skills, listening, reading, writing, speaking and culture using the basic building blocks of vocabulary and grammar. This course is a continuation of Elementary Arabic 1.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate ability to use Arabic vocabulary through speaking, reading, writing and listening.
    2. Recognize a larger pool of Arabic vocabulary.
    3. Describe Arab cultures including religion, dress, food and everyday life.
    4. Develop proper ways to deal with different everyday given situations.
    5. Employ vocabulary and grammar to produce structured sentences and express factual information, needs and wants.
    6. Recognize the modern Arabic language standards used all around the world and differentiate between it and colloquial Arabic.
    7. Construct knowledge of vocabulary and grammar to comprehend written passages in Arabic.
    8. Translate a passage in Arabic and summarize it in one’s own words.
    9. Translate spoken messages.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocabulary and sentence structure
    2. Culture
    3. Grammar
    4. Reading Comprehension
    5. Listening Comprehension
    6. Writing and Speaking
    7. Colloquial Arabic
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet, DVDs.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


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Art History & Studio Art

  
  • ART 103 - Art History - Ancient


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course to develop an understanding and appreciation of the visual arts and artistic periods of Western Civilization from the pre-historic through medieval Europe to the Renaissance.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify, in a chronologic order, major western artistic periods, and eras, from pre-history through medieval Europe to the Renaissance.
    2. Describe the role that art played in the development of civilization as language and invention.
    Listed Topics
    1. Chronological survey of western pre-historic art and major artistic eras and periods through medieval Europe to the Renaissance.
    2. Overview of the rise of civilization through major artistic periods and the communicative and technological role that art played in the evolution of western civilization from the pre-historic through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.
    Reference Materials
    Texts may include:
         Gardner’s History of Art
         Janson’s History of Art
         Laurie Schneider Adams: Art Across Time. 2nd edition. Vol. 1
    Films, videos, visits to museums, galleries, shows
    Class discussions and research
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 104 - Art History - Modern


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course to develop an understanding and appreciation of the major visual artists and art movements of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to contemporary times.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify, in chronological order, major artists, artistic periods and art movements of western civilization from the Renaissance through contemporary times.
    2. Explain the evolution, revolution and/or devolution of an art movement in historical terms.
    3. Discuss the importance of the role that art played in technical innovation, intellectual development and social and political history.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical and creative experiences of past and present cultures
    2. Past cultural experiences and their influence on succeeding and contemporary artistic experiments
    3. Chronological survey of western art from the Renaissance through contemporary times.
    4. General criteria upon which the student may begin to build his/her own ability to make critical artistic judgments
    5. Study of major western artists, artistic periods and art movements
    6. Evolution, revolution, and devolution of art through time
    7. Technical innovation, intellectual development and social and political relevance of art as history
    Reference Materials
    Laurie Schneider Adams: Art Across Time, 2nd edition, Vol. 11, 14th Century to Present. McGraw Hill
    Gardner’s History of Art
    Films, videos, visits to museums, galleries, shows
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 106 - Art Appreciation


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is intended to be a first level introductory art course for the beginning art students, as well as the student seeking a humanities elective in the visual arts. The student’s appreciation of art will be developed through aesthetics, disciplines, critical evaluations, projects, history and attendance at a real or virtual art show.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Distinguish between the psychological, social and political concepts of the visual arts, as well as the formal elements and principles.
    2. Draw conclusions from art work and demonstrate methods used to write critical articles.
    3. Distinguish artwork in categories of era, style, movement and medium.  
    4. Through short art projects the student will apply techniques of art such as drawing and painting (traditional course only)
       
    Listed Topics
    1. Elements of art- line, shape, mass, space, time and motion, light, color, and texture
    2. Principles of design- unity and variety, balance, emphasis and subordination, directional forces, contrast, repetition and rhythm, scale and proportion
    3. Two-Dimensional art and mediums-drawing, painting, printmaking, camera arts and digital imaging, graphic design and illustration
    4. Three-Dimensional art and mediums- sculpture, clay, glass, metal, wood, fiber, architecture and environmental design
    5. History of art- eras (Paleolithic to current), movements, styles, mediums, artists and their work.
    6. 3 types of art criticism- formal theories, sociocultural theories, expressive theories
    7. 4-steps to critical evaluation of art- description, analysis, interpretation, and judgment
    8. Several short essays may inclued:
              a. Descriptive memory of artwork seen.
              b. Artwork related to community such as town sculptures and local artists work.
              c. Political artwork related to past, current and future events.
              d. Critical evaluation of art.
    9. Art projects such as:  drawing and painting related to still life, perspective and chiaroscuro
    Reference Materials
    Textbook: Artforms, Preble, Preble and Frank
    Online resources: galleries, virtual museums
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 109 - Drawing 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This is a course in drawing using dry and wet media. Subject matter ranges from perspective to accurately rendered objects and the human body. Students develop imagination, perception, and technical skills. The focus is on the ability to observe form as a unique, creative, individual response.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Calculate line, shape and volume as it relates to rendering objects and the human figure in a variety of black, white and/or color in media.
    2. Create a compilation of drawings reflecting the individual’s level of skill development, in rough form and finished (matted) format.
    3. Convert three dimensional images to a two dimensional surface.
    Listed Topics
    1. Exploration of 1, 2 and 3 point perspective as it relates to structures, inanimate objects and the figure
    2. Techniques of foreshortening, etc., short and long gestures, line and mass drawing
    3. Various materials to create the illusion of an object, figure in space: i.e. conti, pencil, ink, pastels, etc. and a variety of surfaces
    4. Regular in-class critiques
    Reference Materials
    In-class demonstrations, outside drawing, the posed (clothed or nude) model.
    Videos, films and library research with optional and required texts, field trips to museums, galleries, or the internet.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 113 - Graphic Communication


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course will develop the student’s ability to communicate ideas and messages. The field of graphic communications will be explored through history, research and examples. Industry proven assignments covered in the course include advertising, identity systems, information design and event promotion. Aesthetic and technical skill development will be examined in the phases of design of traditional sketch through to finished digital and printed presentations.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate traditional sketch development and variations to communicate ideas.
    2. Apply specific assignment instruction to communicate messages.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency with vector-based software.
    4. Translate conceptualized ideas through to the finished presentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Graphic communication overview
    2. Communicating messages
    3. Design theory
    4. Phases of design
    5. Coverage of vector-based software
    Reference Materials
    Software: Adobe Illustrator or comparable vector-based software
    Text: Instructor-selected text
    Online resources
    Software demonstration
    Student work examples
    Handouts
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/21/2012


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  • ART 114 - Two-Dimensional Design


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course involves exploring and completing projects in various media that demonstrates principles of design in black and white, in a number of values and in color. Students study the use of line, value, shape, form/space and color. Projects must show evidence of balance, rhythm, movement, figure-ground, figure-ground reversal, proximity, repetition, closure, perspective, unity and variety and color harmonies.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Show proficiency in technical, aesthetic and problem-solving skills necessary to effectively communicate an idea, word or concept.
    2. Verbally recall the learned concepts in a group critique situation.
    3. Solve conceptually a visual problem.
    Listed Topics
    1. Creative interpretations of the elements and principles of two-dimensional design, which include balance, structure, units, radiation, gradation, anomaly, similarity and implication
    2. Experimentation in a variety of different media to create effective design
    3. The development of visual communication skills
    4. Verbal communication skills as they relate to group critique and evaluation of artwork
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/15/2014


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  • ART 122 - Painting 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 109  Recommended.

     
    Description
    This is a course to teach the fundamentals of painting with oils or acrylics. Emphasis is on color theory and its practical application. Students should have a basic understanding of art composition and the abilities to sketch their concepts.


    Learning Outcomes
    Identify various problems in painting Describe and apply elements of composition, space perspective, color harmony, value and texture Develop and illustrate personal perception and unique interpretations Demonstrate a variety of painting techniques Develop fundamental painting skills
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 129 - Printmaking 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to various printmaking processes, including relief, stencil and intaglio. Students learn the proper use of tools, inks and paper through exploration and the production of edition prints.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the techniques, processes, and materials used in printmaking.
    2. Create editions through the processes of intaglio, stencil, screen printing and relief.
    Listed Topics
    1. Translation of an original idea through the technical printmaking processes used to create a finished product.
    2. Materials and techniques used in various methods of printing techniques
    3. Production of edition prints using the intaglio, screen printing, stencil and relief processes
    4. Printmaking’s application as fine art
    Reference Materials
    The Complete Printmaker by Ross, Romano, Ross
    Lectures, Slides, Demonstrations, Critiques
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 130 - Photography 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course is a survey of the aesthetics and history of photography. Methods of camera operation, lighting, exposure, darkroom procedures, printing and enlarging are studied. The criterion of visual images as communication is stressed. An inexpensive 35mm reflex camera is needed for this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Relate the evolution of photography through historical progress.
    2. Define and apply the terminology used in photography.
    3. Demonstrate the order and methods used in film processing development.
    4. Illustrate and demonstrate basic darkroom techniques (Print).
    5. Demonstrate various methods of photographic presentation.
    6. Employ photography as a means of personal and photograph commercial expression
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical survey of photography from Camera Obscura to modern digital advancements
    2. Primary elements of the camera mechanics, along with basic components that support proper film exposure, proper film and paper development to basic print manipulation
    3. Outline the photographic design elements that construct an image
    4. Review proper methods of exhibiting photographs
    5. Conduct assignment critiques as a group to further comprehension
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, film and slides, as they relate to the various assignments/photographic topics.
    Specific handouts outlining the topic, technique and skill required.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 137 - Ceramics 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This is an introductory course in ceramics. Students learn the proper use of tools and techniques to create 3-dimensional works through this very plastic medium. Slab and coil construction, wheel throwing, glazing and firing are studied
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify tools, techniques, materials, and processes used in making ceramic objects.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to make finished ceramic objects using the tools, techniques, materials and processes studied.
    3. Employ aesthetically sensitive glazing techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Translation of original ideas through various clay making processes used to create finished ceramic objects
    2. Materials and techniques used in various aspects of the clay and ceramics media
    3. Glaze application on pieces made by the student to produce a finished product
    Reference Materials
    Recommended texts or suggested readings:

    • Pottery on the Wheel, Woody
    • Finding One’s Way with Clay, P. Berenshohn
    • Hands in Clay, C. Speight
    • New Ceramics, E. Lewenstein
    • Ceramics Design, J. Kenny
    • Ceramics, A Potter’s Handbook, G. Nelson

    Audio-visual materials


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 138 - Sculpture 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This is a course presenting both the historical and contemporary techniques of sculpture. Materials such as clay, wood and stone, as well as methods and work in welding, carving, casting, modeling and non-metallics are included.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the historical evolution of man’s need to relate his existence to the world through sculpting.
    2. Distinguish between the importance of special displacement and two dimensional work.
    3. Demonstrate both safe and proper use of manual and power tools.
    4. Show constructive (add to) vs. deconstructive (remove from) methods related to various materials.
    5. Analyze individual approach as it relates to scale and materials.
    Listed Topics
    1. Chronology of significant historical accomplishments in sculpture from prehistoric to modern
    2. Apply design elements fundamental to three dimensional work
    3. Show safe & proper use of tools as it applies to the various materials
    Reference Materials
    Slides and film. Sketches or other pictorial resources for reference. Textbook or handouts regarding specific exercises or technique & safety standards.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 142 - Jewelry Making 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This is an introductory course exploring metal fabricating and casting. Basic metalsmithing techniques are employed in the making of finished pieces of jewelry and objects of art.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the complexity of materials, techniques, and skills required to successfully complete a piece of art.
    2. Demonstrate the basic techniques and use of equipment necessary manipulate metal.
    3. Create stylized, unique, individual pieces of art and jewelry.
    Listed Topics
    1. Demonstration of proper techniques in layout, design, and manipulation of metals
    2. Various projects assigned with all of the following techniques incorporated:
    •  Unit piercing
    •  Riveting
    •  Pin Back manufacture
    •  Soldering
    •  Surface treatment (texture, patina, etching)
    •  Jump rings
    •  Casting
    Reference Materials
    The Complete Metalsmith by Tim McCrieght
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 144 - Digital Photography


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: Digital camera and Windows experience or permission of the instructor.

     
    Description
    This course will provide students interested in photography with the fundamental principles of a captured image with a digital camera. Besides camera basics, other topics to be studied are: composition, aesthetics, legal and ethical considerations, advantages to conventional photography and creativity from camera to computer (the digital darkroom).


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. To operate the basic functions of a digital camera.
    2. To employ current digital applications to a photographic image.
    3. To make use of scanning and other capturing techniques in photography.
    4. To illustrate digital refinement s to a photographic image.
    5. To manipulate a digital image for the greater creative expression.
    6. To handle storage (file) and management (retrieval) of digital images.
    7. To select and adopt appropriate formats to a photographic image.
    8. To recognize and demonstrate specific design elements in a photograph.
    Listed Topics
    1. The basics of the digital camera – resolution, styles, types, formats, storage and accessories
    2. Comparison between film and digital media – how to apply a variety of ways to enhance or create stylized, personalized or commercialized images
    Reference Materials
    Blackboard, Imaging software (Adobe) and a textbook
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 148 - Color


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This is an introduction to basic color theory. The application of color theory to painting, design and the development of individual color sensitivity are stressed. Studies may include color physics, the psychology of color, color expression, impression and composition.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define vocabulary and terminology used in color linguistics.
    2. Explain the complexity of color schemes.
    3. Differentiate the diversity of color applications, schemes and theories.
    4. Demonstrate proficiency in applied technique.
    Listed Topics
    1. Explain words and terms used in color applications
    2. Color physics, psychology, and historical development of color theories
    3. Color mixing and enumerable combinations as they apply to the additive and subtractive laws of color
    4. Color principles as they apply to various art, endeavors
    5. Heighten visual sensitivity and comprehension of color theories
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library supplements, slides and examples of projects; film or other A.V. resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 150 - Intro to Digital Graphic Design


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 100  

     
    Description
    This introductory course utilizes current digital hardware and software used in the industry as the primary tools for Graphic Design. The student will learn the design skills necessary to develop conceptualized ideas on projects that are viable in today’s Graphic Design field.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the aesthetics of graphic design.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency with vector based software.
    3. Utilize current hardware and software to develop projects for print and the web.
    4. Show proficiency in designing independent compositions such as logos and letterforms. Also, single-page compositions such as promotional covers and posters.
    Listed Topics
       1. Graphic design overview including history, definition, and online/hard copy resources
       2. Introduction to design theory including:

    • Elements of art (as applied to graphic design) - line, shape, texture, space, time and motion, color, and typography
    • Principles of design (as applied to graphic design) - unity and variety, balance, scale and proportion, hierarchy,  rhythm and repetition
    • Compositional theory - symmetrical, asymmetrical, law of thirds, grid layout, and radial

       3. Introduction to phases of design (may be unique per instructor):

    • Research - resources, demographic and scope
    • Development - develop concept through variations
    • Finalize - craftsmanship, prepare file for print and/or web

       4. Coverage of vector based software including:

    • Typesetting, object and color control, Bezier tool, paths, layers, image editing and preparing media for the web and print.
    Reference Materials
    Software: Adobe Illustrator or comparable vector based software
    Text: Adobe Classroom in a book (suggested) Online resources
    Software demonstration
    Student work examples
    Handouts
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 10/29/2007


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 153 - Raku-Lowfire Ceramics 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to Raku and Low Fire clays, glazes and firing techniques. Students make clay objects either on the wheel or by hand and set up a Raku Kiln.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate basic clay forming techniques and Raku glazing, firing, and reduction techniques.
    2. Show conceptual awareness of form and aesthetics.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cultural and historical differences to traditional methods of making clay objects
    2. Concentrated knowledge in using low firing clay bodies
    3. Glaze application
    4. Raku and electric kiln firing techniques
    5. Methods of reduction
    6. Group or individual critiques
    7. Kiln set up
    Reference Materials
    Films, videos, demonstrations and critiques
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 165 - Digital Publishing


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 100  

     
    Description
    This course is an examination into the digital publishing field that focuses on page layout and design: This course will involve working on projects common in the publishing field. This course will utilize current desktop publishing software.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate a proficiency in page layout skills.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency with Page Layout software.
    3. Utilize current hardware and software to develop projects for print.
    4. Demonstrate a proficiency in designing multiple page sequential design project.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to design theory including:
    • Elements of art (as applied to publishing)- line, shape, texture, space, time and motion, color, and typography
    • Principles of design (as applied to publishing)- unity and variety, balance, scale and proportion, hierarchy, rhythm and repetition
    • Compositional theory-symmetrical, asymmetrical, law of thirds, grid layout, and radial

        2. Introduction to phases of design (may be unique per instructor):

    • Research- resources, demographic and scope
    • Development- develop concept through variations
    • Finalize- craftsmanship, prepare file for print and/or web.

        3. Coverage of page layout software including:

    • Document setup, character and paragraph typesetting, Image placement and editing, color management, graphic creation, multiple page control, pagination

        4. Traditional Techniques such as:

    •  Thumbnail sketches, folding, folding setup, paper, and binding
    Reference Materials
    Software: Adobe InDesign or comparable page layout software
    Text: Adobe Classroom in a book (suggested)
    Online resources
    Software demonstration
    Student work examples
    Handouts
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 168 - Digital Imaging


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course covers art theory as applied to photography and digital imaging. Techniques of image editing, enhancement and layering may be applied to individual images, collage and composites suitable for a portfolio.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compose individual images as well as collage.
    2. Categorize fields of photography as applied to digital imaging.
    3. Put into action photo editing software on images captured through scanning, camera or internet.
    4. Show proficiency in preparing files for the web and print output.
    Listed Topics
    1. Compositional theory as applied to individual images and collage.
    2. Fields of art: portraiture, Travel and exploration, architectural, photojournalism, documentary, snapshot, personal social, advertising and fashion, industrial, scientific, nature, art.
    3. Coverage of raster based software:
    • Modes: bitmap, grayscale, duotone, indexed, RGB and CMYK
    • Selections, brushes, adjustments, filters and layers

        4. Acquiring imagery from digital cameras, scanning and online. Also, how to prepare final media for the web and print.

     Reference Materials
    Software: Adobe Photoshop or comparable raster based software
    Text: Adobe Classroom in a book (suggested) Online resources
    Software demonstration
    Student work examples
    Handouts


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 170 - Web Graphic Design


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 100  or waived with permission of instructor,and Windows experience.

     
    Description
    This course studies the field of graphic design and how it is implemented into the web page design. Initially the student will learn how to prepare media for the web such as typography, digital imaging and animation. During the course the student will implement prepared media and design theory into a personalized web site that will be published on the World Wide Web.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Utilize learned visual layout skills to design successful web sites.
    2. Prepare various media for the web utilizing raster based software (Adobe Photoshop).
    3. Layout a successful web site using a WYSIWYG (“what you see is what you get”) web page editor.
    4. Make use of file management within a web site environment.
    5. Publish web sites to the world wide web.
    Listed Topics
    1. Graphic design aesthetics and compositional theory as applied to web page layout
    2. Extensive coverage of successful design solutions currently on the web
    3. Coverage of WYSIWYG (“what you see is what you get”) web page editor:
    • Web Page Layout: inserting media, navigation, bookmarks and page properties
    • Web Publishing: uploading and downloading

       4. Coverage of raster based software :

    • Modes: bitmap, grayscale, duotone, indexed, RGB and CMYK
    • Selections, brushes, adjustments, filters and layers
    • Animation
    Reference Materials
    Software: Adobe Photoshop or comparable raster based software
    Text: Designing Web Graphics. Lynda Weinman (required)
    Text: Adobe Classroom in a book (suggested)
    Online resources
    Software demonstration
    Student work examples
    Handouts
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 177 - Applied Digital Photography


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 144   or ART 168  or permission of the instructor

     
    Description
    This course is for the more experienced student photographer.  Topics include lighting, staging, in-depth camera functions and post image capture software enhancement techniques.  This course will build the student’s portfolio with more applied photography related to the commercial industry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply best practices related to lighting subject matter.
    2. Define aesthetic composition practices.
    3. Utilize on-camera functions to achieve the desired result.
    4. Explore digital software available functions.
    5. Exercise more advanced composition and psychological photography aesthetics.
    6. Define fields of photography that are more pronounced in the commercial world.
    Listed Topics
    1. Camera lenses and other hardware
    2. Camera manual modes and functions
    3. Lighting and flash techniques
    4. Raster based software editing
    5. Subject matter and techniques related to a theme
    6. Gestalt theory as applied to composing a photograph
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials
    Digital Camera capable of 8MPs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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  • ART 180H - Honors International Study of Art, Architecture and Material Culture, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an on-site survey of art, architecture and material culture. Through international directed field study the student will experience firsthand the aesthetic traditions and history of the nation(s) visited.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify how art, architecture and material culture express the political, cultural, religious and philosophical customs of the geographic region(s) or nation(s) visited.
    2. Outline the history of the nation(s) visited though the art, architecture and material culture produced using first hand aesthetic and cultural experiences gained through travel.
    3. Analyze the art, architecture and material culture experienced during field study by comparing them to those of the North American/ Western tradition.
    Listed Topics
    1. Art, architecture and material culture of the nation(s) visited
    2. History of nation(s) visited
    3. Elements of art- line, shape, mass, space, time and motion, light, color, texture
    4. Principles of design- unity and variety, balance, emphasis and subordination, directional forces, contrast, repetition and rhythm, scale and proportion
    5. Materials and techniques used to create the art, architecture and material culture studied


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 207 - Drawing 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 109  

     
    Description
    This course emphasizes the study of human form as it has been described from the Renaissance to modern times. There is exploration of various wet and dry media as applied to various surfaces.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the human form in a more complex and in-depth method.
    2. Identify the human anatomical form and structure.
    3. Show line, shape, and volume as it relates to rendering the human figure in a variety of drawing media
    Listed Topics
    1. Investigation of the human form through muscular and skeletal structure studies
    2. Use of light, dark, and positive/negative relationships to express volumetric development
    3. Development of individual conceptual awareness
    4. Investigation of old master drawing techniques
    5. Exploration and employment of various media
    Reference Materials
    In class demonstrations of the posed model
    Videos, films and library research with optional and required texts
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 222 - Painting 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 122   or ART 109  & ART 148  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 122  and for students planning to extend the study of art to the media of paint. Studio exercises include the study of the figure, still life and landscape.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. The student is to develop an improved skill level by practicing the various methods affiliated with the media.
    2. Refinement of a style with an individual concept.
    3. Appreciation for the various methods and style in creating an image.
    4. Research into a particular style or technique and demonstrate through several examples a high level of competency.
    Listed Topics
    1. Demonstrations of advanced techniques not illustrated in the introductory course
    2. Further development and control of materials associated with painting and the selected techniques
    Reference Materials
    Textbook & handouts, library and museum.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/18/2007


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 223 - Three-Dimensional Design


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 114  
     
    Description
    This course involves the applications and theories related to objects in the round and is a sequel to 2-D Design. The student will explore the principals of design through projects created from materials like paper, cardboard, clay and wood. Calculations of materials to spatial criteria, constructive methods and practical applications are applied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate and apply the principles of design in a three-dimensional space.
    2. Create forms relative to the use of elements of design.
    3. Synthesize various materials originating from the students concepts.
    4. Coordinate the physical and mechanical properties associated with three-dimensional form.
    5. Define the appropriate terminology as it applies to three-dimensional design.
    6. Develop skills that would apply to the manipulation of various media.
    Listed Topics
    1. Terminology as it applies to three-dimensional design
    2. Construction methods and the material process
    3. Eye-hand coordination with associated power or manual tools
    4. Safety and procedural indoctrination
    5. Illustrate a hierarchy of simple to complex design
    6. Research commercial application of product design
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, examples, slides, Internet and films
     
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 229 - Printmaking 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 129  
     
    Description
    This is a continuation of ART 129 , exploring printing processes in depth with an emphasis on multi-colored prints.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Convert an abstract idea into a printmaking technique through a critical analysis.
    2. Synthesize the proper sequence of methodology necessary to make a multi-colored print.
    3. Demonstrate skills necessary for proper registration of a multi-colored print editions.
    4. Expand the skills learned in the basic course by further exploring previous knowledge.
    5. Employ different printmaking techniques to achieve multi-colored prints with similar outcomes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sequence of techniques, materials and equipment to be used to achieve multi-colored print editions
    2. Application of various printmaking techniques to achieve similar outcomes
    3. Demonstration of proper techniques for multi-color registration
    4. Discussion of critical thought process necessary to successfully complete a multi-colored print edition as applicable to chosen printmaking method
       
    Reference Materials
    Recommended Text: The Complete Printmaker by Ross/Romano/Ross
    Printmaking by G. Petrdi
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 230 - Photography 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 130  or equivalent experience
     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 130  to improve upon the skills of students who have demonstrated proficiency in basic photography. Continued use of 35mm camera and the study of medium to large format camera are conducted. An advance technique with camera in darkroom is explored to produce creative and professional work.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain camera exposure (negative to positive), film and print (chemical) control.
    2. Define the professional requirements related to studio photography.
    3. Differentiate between photographic expression from standard to individualized or social to commercial.
    4. Regulate the outcome of an image through controlled lighting.
    5. Evaluate a scene (previsualization) for an expected outcome.
    6. Identify individual skill level toward a personalized theme.
    7. Distinguish between the similarities and differences of black and white and color photography.
    Listed Topics
    1. Advanced cameras, film and print techniques
    2. Introduction to medium and large format camera and film
    3. Non-standard formatting
    4. Principles involving natural, continuous, and flash lighting
    5. Theory of metering and its correlations to exposure/printing
    6. Portrait, commercial and graphic photography
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, slides, overhead transparencies and films
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 237 - Ceramics 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 137  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 137 . Students use their technical expertise to create more ambitious and individual forms through hand-building techniques or wheel thrown work. Glaze technology and firing are explored.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop glazes from raw material.
    2. Recognition and application of the firing process as it relates to their individual work.
    3. Manipulate the clay medium with greater dexterity.
    4. Develop a series of unified work.
    5. Investigate a more astutely aesthetic approach based in historical relevance as it relates to the individua’s personal style.
    Listed Topics
    1. Glaze technology and materials
    2. Formulation of glaze from raw materials
    3. Exploration of historically relevant work as it relates to the individual’s own work
    4. Work in the context of a series
    Reference Materials
    Ceramics Spectrum by Robin Hopper
    Ceramics Handbook by Charles McKee
    Reference material as per individual direction
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 238 - Sculpture 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 138  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 138 . Students use their technical expertise with media such as clay, plaster, wood and/or metal to work independently on class projects. Fabrication and construction techniques will be covered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Show mastery of skills related to a manipulation of a specific type of material.
    2. Calculate scale and structural difficulties.
    3. Define the refinement process as it relates to specific materials.
    4. Use the treatment of a specific material as a means of aesthetic expression.
    5. Analyze the proper proportions when converting the sketch or model to actual size, along with structural integrity.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sequence of techniques used to achieve the final work from sketch or model
    2. Proper equipment associated with various techniques
    3. Materials as they relate to the final outcome, i.e. types, methods, and application, functional vs. non-functional
    4. Three dimensional design elements which enhance the surface of the materials
    5. Fabrication & construction techniques for various media
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or library reference books, slides, and films. Technical pamphlets, sketch pad and handouts.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 242 - Jewelry Making 2/Adv Metal-Smithing


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 142  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 142 , emphasizing advanced jewelry making techniques through complex design. Techniques may include fabricating three-dimensional objects from sheet metal, closures and surface treatment. Other approaches will be explored.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Expand on the skills learned in the basic course by exploring new techniques.
    2. Have developed critical thought process involved in converting 2-D sheet into 3-D objects.
    3. Have a working knowledge of hinges, springs and clasps.
    4. Access the proper sequence of methods and estimate the feasibility of the projects related to student’s skill level.
    Listed Topics
    1. Design and fabricate a 3-D object from 2-D sheet metal incorporating a hinge, spring, and clasp into the design
    Reference Materials
    Textbook and slides. Examples of work. Handout sheets, Invited jewelers/guest speakers
    The Complete Metalsmith by Tim McCreigh
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 250 - Advanced Digital Graphic Design


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 150  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 150  but will expand on design skills with more intense focus on specific projects such as upcoming events and current design trends. In addition, the student will enhance technical awareness of digital hardware and software as it relates to contemporary standards.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop projects that have more restriction, thereby forcing design concept and time duration allowed for completion.
    2. Produce a complete piece with the addition of more detailed requirements within the project assignment as it relates to industry standards.
    Listed Topics
    1. Continued/Advanced Coverage of Vector based software including:
    •  Bezier tool, outlining type, image tracing and large format design

        2. Work on projects that have restrictive requirements such as:

    • Design project that focuses strictly on the use of type and shape only
    • Themed projects for up coming events
    Reference Materials
    Software: Adobe Illustrator or comparable vector based software
    Text: Adobe Classroom in a book (suggested)
    Online resources
    Software demonstration
    Student work examples
    Handouts
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 10/29/2007


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 252 - Painting 3


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course is a continuation of ART 222 . Emphasis is on developing a personal style through a series of works. Studio exercises may include the human figure and still life.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and apply advanced theories of painting in both wet and dry techniques to a variety of surfaces.
    2. Create a serious of progressive works demonstrating their knowledge and understanding of advanced painting theories.
    3. Analyze painting masters or stylized movements in art to create a selection of individual works.
    Listed Topics
    1. Evaluate and discuss various approaches to the materials and techniques
    2. Discuss evolution of personal style
    3. Explore themes as it applies to series of paintings
    Reference Materials
    Recommended text(s):
    THE ARTIST HANDBOOK OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES by Ralph Mayer
    THE ARTIST HANDBOOK by Roy Smith
    THE NORTHLIGHT HANDBOOK OF ARTISTS MATERIAL by Hebblewhite
    Audio visual – film, videos and field trip
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 253 - Raku-Low Fire Ceramics 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 153  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of study in low firing processes concentrating on Raku firing, kiln design, kiln building and glaze composition. Students will use their technical expertise to create more ambitions and individual forms.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Construct or throw aesthetically pleasing ceramic shapes or forms.
    2. Develop own glazes.
    3. Demonstrate the theoretical and practical knowledge of building a Raku or low fire kiln
    Listed Topics
    Films, videos, demonstrations and critiques
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 255 - Industrial Design and Art


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course will explore the functional and conceptual applications of industrial design and art. Through traditional and digital renderings, students will create conceptualized artwork through to the finalized hand-formed model or computer controlled additive or subtractive prototype.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply best practices to the solution of the design through phases.
    2. Practice the most effective modeling techniques of the final prototype.
    3. Define current and emerging technologies of additive printing and subtractive milling and cutting.
    4. Evaluate the fields of industrial design.
    5. Demonstrate the artistic approach to installation art in static and kinetic form.
    6. Define all applicable energy solutions for power production.
    Listed Topics
    1. Traditional hand-formed methods and materials.
    2. Traditional drawing and painting renderings of art and design.
    3. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional software.
    4. Native and scanned three-dimensional designs produced for output.
    5. Fields of industrial design.
    6. Existing, alternative and emerging technology power sources.
    7. Static and kinetic industrial art.
    8. Ergonomics and safety of design.
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/17/2015


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  • ART 256 - Printmaking 3


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 229  

     
    Description
    This is a course designed to develop the student’s particular direction in printmaking processes. A personal aesthetic is identified and explored through further understanding of the print medium. Techniques for multi-colored presentations will be examined.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Arrange sequence and methodology for completion of more complex, in-depth edition prints.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to skillfully manage and employ advanced printmaking techniques.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to produce multi-colored edition prints in a variety of techniques such as:
    • Silk screen,
    • Wood block/linoleum prints
    • Etching
    • Callograph
    • Drypoint
    • Engraving
    • Mezzotint
    • Aquatint

       4. Demonstrate an expanded technical knowledge of the printmaking process previously undeveloped.

    .Listed Topics

    1. 3-6 projects requiring multiple prints
    2. Theory and practice of multicolored editions
    3. Development of student’s personal aesthetic through choice of process
    4. Discussion of theoretical and practical aspects of multi-colored edition prints such as:
    • Silk Screen
    • Woodblock
    • Linoleum prints
    • Etching
    • Callograph
    • Drypoint
    • Engraving
    • Mezzotint
    • Acquatint
    Reference Materials
    The Complete Printmaker, John Ross-Romano-Ross
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 258 - Ceramics 3


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: ART 237  

     
    Description
    This course builds on previous knowledge acquired in ART 137  and ART 237 . Working closely with the instructor the student will further define and refine his/her personal direction in ceramics.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Show a greater appreciation and a deeper understanding of the ceramic medium.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to express this new-found knowledge through the manipulation of the clay and finished ceramic work.
    3. Identify significant perspectives in ceramics as they relate to the individual student’s work.
    Listed Topics
    1.  Critique of student work including
    • Content/concept
    • Glaze approach
    • Aesthetic values
    • Technical expertise

        2.  Review of student’s developing works to identify and encourage potentially promising direction

        3.  Explore historically relevant work as it relates to the student’s individual work

        4.  Kiln design and function

     Reference Materials
    Clay, clay tools
    Research of specific times, periods, and/or genres throughout ceramic history


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ART 260 - European Art/Architecture


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course is an on-site survey of European Art and Architecture. The student will experience first hand the work of some of the great European artists.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify art and architecture of other cultures and eras.
    2. Outline the history of art, having viewed the actual work, places and culture in which it was produced.
    3. Write research paper on relevant topic covered.
    Listed Topics
    1. European art and architecture
    2. Countries visited
    3. Travel and cultural awareness
    4. On site study of painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts
    5. Slide lecture on relevant cultures to be visited
    6. Research paper
    Reference Materials
    Gardner’s History of Art
    Guide Books
    Camera
    On-site catalogues, pamphlets
    Personal journal
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 09/18/2000


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 265 - Portfolio


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    This is a course only for Art and Graphic Communication majors. The course will concentrate on the various aspects of preparation towards job and transferring requirements. This course is designed to better prepare students for the different qualifications in the arts through a portfolio. Different techniques of recording, presenting and cataloging various art works are examined, as well as developing a personal resume. Students should have a credible body of artwork produced under college level instruction available for use in class.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define what constitutes a professional standard per exhibition, job market and school admission.
    2. Evaluate and identify the various applications associated with the development of a portfolio.
    3. Arrange work in a portfolio that demonstrates individual talents and skills.
    4. Review, translate and transfer original work to various media.
    5. Apply various interviewing skills when seeking a job.
    6. Analyze and assess individual strengths and weaknesses per discipline.
    Listed Topics
    1. Art work sorting and evaluation in preparation for a portfolio
    2. Appropriate discipline standards to rework or eliminate art work
    3. Capturing or reproducing art work for a specific outcome
    4. Acceptable techniques for cataloging multiple disciplines
    5. Different field requirements for a practical portfolio size
    6. Portfolio importance in a “visual” field
    Reference Materials
    Demonstrations, guest lecturers, illustrations, models or examples and resource books
    related to this topic.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/21/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 291 - Advanced Art Workshop 1


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    The student will learn to develop elements of artistic expression through self-analysis of style and direction in an in-depth individualized exploration of aesthetics regarding a selective medium/discipline.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. An evaluation of individual skills and perspective to a particular medium.
    2. A defined, selective approach to improving comprehension of the media.
    3. To review technical expertise required in manipulating the media.
    4. Match individual approach with elected media.
    5. Periodic evaluation and potential progress.
    6. Record specific requirements as the reflect development in the media.

     Listed Topics

    1. Outline individual direction by review of portfolio or previous by attended courses
    2. Emphasize the nature of this course and all advance Art Workshops (1,2,3, and 4) as a course for those individuals determined to become a professional, specializing in a particular media
       
    Reference Materials
    Required Materials: Materials associated with the specific medium to be studied. Audio Visual Materials: Films, sound filmstrips, slides and videos on Master and Major Art Movements.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 292 - Advanced Art Workshop 2


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    The student will learn to develop elements of artistic expression through self-analysis of style and direction in an in-depth individualized exploration of aesthetics regarding a selective medium/discipline.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate individual skills and perspective to a particular medium.
    2. Define and select an approach to improving comprehension of the media.
    3. Review technical expertise required in manipulating the media.
    4. Match individual approach with elected media.
    5. Tabulate periodic evaluation and potential progress.
    Listed Topics
    1. Outline individual direction by review of portfolio or previous courses
    2. Emphasize the nature of this course and all advance Art Workshops (1,2,3, and 4) as a course for those individuals determined to become a professional, specializing in a particular media
    Reference Materials
    Required Materials: Materials associated with the specific medium to be studied. Audio Visual Materials: Films, sound filmstrips, slides and videos on Master and Major Art Movements.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 293 - Advanced Art Workshop 3


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    The student will learn to develop elements of artistic expression through self-analysis of style and direction in an in-depth individualized exploration of aesthetics regarding a selective medium/discipline.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. An evaluation of individual skills and perspective to a particular medium.
    2. A defined, selective approach to improving comprehension of the media.
    3. To review technical expertise required in manipulating the media.
    4. Match individual approach with elected media.
    5. Periodic evaluation and potential progress.
    6. Record specific requirements as the reflect development in the media.
    Listed Topics
    1. Outline individual direction by review of portfolio or previous by attended courses
    2. Emphasize the nature of this course and all advance Art Workshops (1,2,3, and 4) as a course for those individuals determined to become a professional, specializing in a particular media
    Reference Materials
    Required Materials: Materials associated with the specific medium to be studied. Audio Visual Materials: Films, sound filmstrips, slides and videos on Master and Major Art Movements.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 294 - Advanced Art Workshop 4


    Credits: 3
    5 Studio Hours

    Description
    The student will learn to develop elements of artistic expression through self-analysis of style and direction in an in-depth individualized exploration of aesthetics regarding a selective medium/discipline.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1.  An evaluation of individual skills and perspective to a particular medium.
    2.  A defined, selective approach to improving comprehension of the media.
    3.  To review technical expertise required in manipulating the media.
    4.  Match individual approach with elected media.
    5.  Periodic evaluation and potential progress.
    6.  Record specific requirements as the reflect development in the media.

     Listed Topics

    1. Outline individual direction by review of portfolio or previous by attended courses
    2. Emphasize the nature of this course and all advance Art Workshops (1,2,3, and 4) as a course for those individuals determined to become a professional, specializing in a particular media
    Reference Materials
    Required Materials: Materials associated with the specific medium to be studied. Audio Visual Materials: Films, sound filmstrips, slides and videos on Master and Major Art Movements.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ART 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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  • ART 406 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 6
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


    Course and Section Search



Automotive Technology

  
  • ATE 103 - Automotive Systems/Minor Service


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces the student to shop operations that would be performed by an entry level technician. This includes an introduction to shop safety, the use of basic shop equipment, hand tools and service information for factory- recommended repair procedures. The student will learn the use of measuring equipment including micrometers, calipers and dial indicators. The course includes service procedures for lubrication, routine maintenance, basic repairs, tire repair and new car pre-delivery inspection. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use hand tools safely and properly.
    2. Apply the practice of shop safety in the shop area.
    3. Discuss and practice the proper use of safety stands, floor jacks and vehicle lifts.
    4. Translate vehicle identification numbers.
    5. Interpret service information and apply industry-accepted repair procedures.
    6. Handle waste oils, used batteries and other hazardous materials according to current EPA and OSHA standards.
    Listed Topics
    1. Shop safety
    2. Basic hand tools, battery chargers, battery testers, lubrication equipment, jacks and safety stands
    3. Basic shop equipment and vehicle lifts
    4. New and used car pre-delivery inspection
    5. Shop manuals and electronic service information
    6. Computer system scan tools
    7. Preventative maintenance and minor repairs
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


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  • ATE 106 - Emission Inspector Certification


    Credits: 1
    1 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is a Pennsylvania state-directed Emission Inspector Certification Program. It is designed for anyone wishing to become certified in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to perform emission inspections on passenger cars and light trucks. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis. The student will be required to enroll in Pennsylvania’s online training portal.  There are additional testing and material fees associated with this enrollment that require credit card payment. Students must be 18 years of age and hold a valid drivers license.  Students must achieve a score of at least 80% on the Pennsylvania online training portal website to pass this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the causes and effects of air pollution on the environment.
    2. Recall the purpose and methods of the Pennsylvania State Inspection Program and its test procedures.
    3. Identify emission inspection components, their functions and configurations.
    4. Identify emission test equipment operation, calibration and maintenance.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pennsylvania automotive emission regulations and inspection methods
    2. Emission control components and visual inspections
    3. Exhaust gas analysis
    4. Air pollution
    5. Public relations
    6. Quality control procedures
    7. Safety and health issues
    Reference Materials
    Pennsylvania’s online training portal
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


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  • ATE 108 - State Inspection Certification


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a Pennsylvania State directed Safety Inspection Certification Program. It is designed for anyone wishing to become Pennsylvania Certified to perform safety inspections on motor vehicles. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Pass a final written baseline exam with a 70% score or higher.
    2. Pass a final written category exam with a 70% score or higher.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pennsylvania Automotive Safety Regulations
    2. Demonstration of Required Safety Inspection Tools
    3. Administrative Procedures
    4. Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Forms
    5. Detailed Explanation of Section 175.80
    Reference Materials
    Current Pennsylvania Vehicle Equipment and Inspection Regulation Manual.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 121 - Electrical Systems and Power Accessories


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course covers electrical principles, including voltage, resistance, current flow, series and parallel circuits and Ohm’s Law relating to the automobile. This course also covers the operation, testing and repairing of the starting and charging systems, including electrical accessories. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply basic automotive electricity and electrical accessories using simulators and lab exercises.
    2. Explain and apply the principles of Ohm’s Law.
    3. Identify basic electrical circuit designs.
    4. Use digital volt/ohm/amp meters.
    5. Interpret and evaluate voltage and current readings obtained during battery, starting and charging testing and diagnosis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Electrical Terms (voltage, current, resistance)
    2. Ohm’s Law
    3. Series, parallel and series-parallel circuit design and operation
    4. Magnetism
    5. Electrical test equipment
    6. Batteries
    7. Wiring schematics
    8. Wiring and circuit repair
    9. DC motors and starting systems
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 122 - Electronic Systems


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 121  

     
    Description
    This course includes the theory, operation and application of electronic sensing devices. The computer process of sensing a condition, deciding on an output and controlling the output will be covered in detail. Students will study computer networking as it applies to the vehicle. Students will use specific test equipment to interface with the vehicle’s computer system to analyze and diagnose vehicle faults. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use scan tools to solve computer electrical related problems.
    2. Interpret and evaluate readings obtained from electronic diagnostic equipment.
    3. Identify computer inputs and associate these to correct corresponding outputs.
    4. Interpret and document the diagnostic process used to solve an automotive-related computer network fault.
    5. Describe and give an example of each step in the electrical diagnostic process.
    6. Analze and evaluate scan tool data.
    Listed Topics
    1. Diodes and transistors
    2. Charging systems
    3. Computer input devices
    4. Integrated circuits as input devices
    5. Computer output devices
    6. Resistive and digital multiplexing
    7. Computer networking
    8. Reading and interpreting oscilloscope patterns
    9. Scan tool usage
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 126 - Steering and Suspension


    Credits: 4
    6 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 103  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to industry-recognized diagnosis and replacement of steering components in power steering systems and suspension systems. Topics include tire repair and replacement, computerized wheel balancing, suspension and steering component inspection, strut service and computerized four-wheel alignment. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss the design and operation of all steering and suspension components.
    2. Computerize 4-wheel alignment and apply corrective measures.
    3. Adjust steering gears, columns and pump assemblies using industry-recognized procedures.
    4. Identify and replace defective steering and suspension components.
    5. Dismount, remount and balance tires.
    Listed Topics
    1. Adjustment of suspension angles
    2. Effects of front and rear end alignment
    3. Steering and suspension systems components
    4. Electronic suspension systems components
    5. Computerized wheel balancing equipment
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 130 - Automotive Brake Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 103  

     
    Description
    This course covers the diagnosis, troubleshooting and repair of disc and drum brake systems, power brake boosters, master cylinders, wheel cylinders and related components. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the components of the self energizing and leading /trailing drum brake systems.
    2. Replace disc and drum brake components.
    3. Discuss fixed and floating front and rear brake calipers.
    4. Describe different types of hydraulic split systems used on current model vehicles.
    5. Evaluate the necessity to overhaul or replace wheel cylinders, calipers, master cylinders and power brake units.
    6. Measure machine rotors and drums using industry-approved tools and techniques.
    7. Describe the operating characteristics of a compensating port master cylinder, center valve master cylinder and a combination valve master cylinder.
    8. Correct bleeding procedures and adjust both hydraulic and mechanical brake systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hydraulic brake systems
    2. Disc/drum brake systems
    3. 4-wheel disc systems
    4. Power brake systems
    5. Parking brake systems
    6. Rotor and drum machining
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 131 - Major Engine Service


    Credits: 4
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course will introduce students to major engine repair using industry-approved procedures. Emphasis will be placed on component identifications, the proper use of measuring tools and determining the reusability of parts to restore engines to factory-approved specifications. Students will be able to make clearance checks, replace piston and rings, inspect and replace crankshaft bearings, service valve train components and make all required timing adjustments. Diagnosis of internal engine component failures using industry-recognized tools and techniques will also be covered. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use precision engine measuring tools.
    2. Identify different types and configurations of the internal combustion engine.
    3. Apply approved service manual techniques to the disassembly and reassembly of the internal combustion engine.
    4. Define internal and external engine components and analyze their condition and reusability.
    5. Explain the cause of internal engine failures using industry-recognized diagnostic publications and testing instruments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Precision engine measuring and assembly tools
    2. Engine condition and failure analysis
    3. Engine configurations and specifications
    4. Engine oils, lubrication and cooling systems
    5. Engine symptom analysis
    6. Component theory, operation and design
    7. Engine overhaul
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 151 - Automotive Climate Systems


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course covers the principles of refrigeration, air conditioning controls and the diagnosis, trouble-shooting and repair of automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify refrigerant properties.
    2. Use tools to recover, evacuate and recharge an automotive/light truck air conditioning system.
    3. Explain and demonstrate removal and replacement procedures for air conditioning/heating components.
    4. Use diagnostic equipment, leak detection, flushing, fluorescent dye and refrigerant identification.
    5. Diagnose problems in the passenger compartment of heating and air conditioning systems.
    6. Perform electrical circuit diagnosis and repairs associated with HVAC systems.
    7. Interpret the Federal Certification under Section 609.
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic theory and operation of HVAC systems
    2. Automotive/light truck refrigeration system diagnosis and repair
    3. Case duct system disassemble and reassemble
    4. Multi-zone air conditioning system
    5. Front/rear air conditioning system diagnosis and repair
    6. Heating and cooling system
    7. Recovery, evacuation and recharge equipment
    8. Leak detection/dye equipment to diagnose A/C leaks
    9. Federal Certification under Sec. 609
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ATE 160 - Adv Auto Electricity/Electronics


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ATE 122  

     
    Description
    This course reinforces the theories and approaches learned in ATE 121  and ATE 122  by extending students’ skill level by performing the latest in diagnostic technology. Using shop manuals and technical bulletins, combined with the latest diagnostic equipment, students will practice troubleshooting systems such as anti-lock brakes, electronic steering and suspension controls, electronic body controls, anti-theft systems and other systems released by manufacturers. Students will be introduced to hybrid safety and design. Certain course sections will be manufacturer specific.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform proper safety procedures working with electricity.
    2. Perform diagnosis, testing and repair of anti-lock brake systems, electronic steering and suspension controls, electronic body controls, entertainment systems, anti-theft systems and other released systems.
    3. Evaluate readings obtained from diagnosis and testing of automotive electronic systems.
    4. Conduct circuit repair and component replacement procedures.
    5. Identify circuit faults and make necessary wiring repairs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Anti-lock brakes/traction control
    2. Electronic steering/suspension/stability assist
    3. Electronic body controls
    4. Introduction to hybrid safety and design
    5. Vehicle electronic controls
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


 

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