Jun 21, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Court Reporting

  
  • CRT 211 - Court Transcription 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 111  

     
    Description
    This course offers advanced proficiency in English grammar, usage and punctuation with emphasis on advanced proficiency in editing, proofreading and correction of text in court reporting transcripts. Development of Case CATalyst software skills required in the production of corrected transcripts is also emphasized.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop advanced proficiency in English language skills including grammar, usage and punctuation.
    2. Utilize advanced research skills.
    3. Develop advanced skills in editing, proofreading and correction of text.
    4. Develop proficiency in Case CATalyst software.
    5. Use Case CATalyst software to produce corrected, accurate transcripts.
    Listed Topics
    1. English grammar, punctuation and usage
    2. Proofreader’s symbols
    3. Spelling and researching
    4. Proofreading, editing and correcting of text for accuracy
    5. Software training
    Reference Materials
    A textbook will be required
    Audio-visual Materials: Course material available at class Blackboard site on http://courses.ccac.edu/ and supplemental material on the internet
    Open Lab, Tutoring, etc.: Library 311A Practice Lab
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/11/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 215 - Court Transcription 3


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 211  

     
    Description
    This course offers advanced proficiency in formatting and production of spoken language into text as required by several disciplines of the court reporting profession including judicial reporting and captioning (broadcast captioning and CART captioning-Communication Access Realtime Translation). Reinforcement of advanced language skills and advanced skills in the use of Case CATalyst software are integral to the course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to assume the role of the realtime reporter through assignments in several disciplines of court reporting including judicial proceedings (trials and depositions) and captioning (broadcast captioning and CART captioning Communication Access Realtime Translation).
    2. Demonstrate the ability to understand and employ transcript formatting requirements for each discipline.
    3. Demonstrate familiarity with and ability to fulfill services and responsibilities associated with each discipline in terms of client communications, job preparation, realtime skills, and delivery of service.
    4. Apply National Court Reporter’s Association (NCRA) Code of Professional Ethics in simulated situations and case studies.
    5. Identify reference sources used in transcript preparation in a realtime writing environment.
    6. Use Case CATalyst software to produce correcte4d, accurate, correctly formatted transcripts.
    Listed Topics
    1. English grammar, punctuation and usage
    2. Proofreader’s symbols
    3. Spelling and researching
    4. Proofreading, editing and correction of text for accuracy
    5. Transcript formatting and production standards
    6. Software training
    Reference Materials
    A textbook will be required
    Audio-visual Materials: Course material available at class Blackboard site on http://courses.ccac.edu/ and supplemental material on the internet
    Open Lab, Tutoring, etc.: Library 311A Practice Lab
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/11/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 216 - Question and Answer 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 206  
    Co-requisites: CRT 217  and CRT 218  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Question & Answer material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in testimony are reviewed. Colloquy designations are stressed in multi-voice material. The goal is writing 180 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Question and Answer material at 180 words per minute, using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 180 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Write multi-syllable and unfamiliar words with speed and accuracy, including medical and technical dictation.
    5. Take dictation of multi-voice material utilizing machine shorthand speaker designations at 180 words per minute with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    6. Use correct use grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 217 - Jury Charge 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 207  
    Co-requisites: CRT 216  and CRT 218  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Jury Charge material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in Jury Charge are reviewed. The goal is writing 160-180 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Jury Charge material at 160-180 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 160-180 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 218 - Literary 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 208  
    Co-requisites: CRT 216  and CRT 217  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Literary material. The goal is writing 150 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Literary material at 150 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 140-160 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 226 - Question and Answer 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 216  
    Co-requisites: CRT 227  and CRT 228  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Question & Answer material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in testimony are reviewed. Colloquy designations are stressed in multi-voice material. The goal is writing 225 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software. This proficiency must be demonstrated three times.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Question and Answer material at 225 words a minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course. Three takes will be completed at 225 words per minute for five minutes with 95 percent accuracy to meet National Court Reporter’s Association (NCRA) requirements.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 225 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Write multi-syllable and unfamiliar words with speed and accuracy including medical and technical dictation.
    5. Take dictation of multi-voice material utilizing machine shorthand speaker designations at 225 words per minute with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    6. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 227 - Jury Charge 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 217  
    Co-requisites: CRT 226  and CRT 228  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Jury Charge material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in Jury Charge are reviewed. The goal is writing 200 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software. This proficiency must be demonstrated three times.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Jury Charge material at 200 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course. Three takes will be completed at 200 words per minute for five minutes with 95 percent accuracy to meet National Court Reporter’s Association (NCRA) requirements.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 200 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 228 - Literary 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 218  
    Co-requisites: CRT 226  and CRT 227  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Literary material. The goal is writing 180 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software. This proficiency must be demonstrated three times.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Literary material at 180 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.  Three takes will be completed at 180 words per minute for five minutes at 95 percent accuracy to meet National Court Reporter’s Association (NCRA) requirements.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 180 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice three hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 251 - Court Reporting 6


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 104  

     
    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development in Literary, Jury Charge and Question and Answer material. The course prepares the student to increase speed and accuracy through weekly testing. The goal is to write machine shorthand tests for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Question and Answer, Jury Charge and Literary material using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Write multi-syllable and unfamiliar words with speed and accuracy including medical and technical dictation.
    5. Take dictation of multi-voice material utilizing machine shorthand speaker designations with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    6. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Materials and Resources:
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: CDs used in concert with theory lessons, CD player
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 252P - Court Reporting Internship


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 218  

     
    Description
    This course is a practical work experience for the Court Reporting student, arranged in consultation and conjunction between the internship student, the supervising faculty member and the internship site. The student spends no less than 40 verified hours writing judicial, closed captioning or Computer Access Realtime Translation (CART) material under the supervision of a court reporter. To complete the course the student will produce 40 pages of transcript for grading purposes and write a narrative detailing their internship experience. The course consists of scheduled classroom sessions with the instructor, individual appointments and on-the-job training. Students are assigned to Judicial, Freelance, Closed Captioning and CART environments.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the various courtroom procedures required of the court reporter: handling exhibits, off-the-record discussions, motions, witness gestures, oral reading of notes, colloquy designations, side bar discussions and transcript production.
    2. Apply tools learned in the classroom to identify proper professional conduct: appropriate dress, attitude, confidentiality, loyalty, punctuality and respect for the courtroom participants.
    3. Explain record keeping, scheduling, billing and general organization of the court reporting office.
    4. Produce in proper format a 40 page error-free, computer software generated transcript of internship experiences which will be used for grading purposes and not sold.
    5. Document 40 hours of verified writing in a Judicial, Freelance, Closed Captioning or CART setting.
    6. Write a comprehensive narrative of internship experience.
    Listed Topics
    1. Judicial, Freelance, Closed Captioning and CART court reporting
    2. Resumes, letters of application, thank you letters
    3. Code of professional ethics
    4. Dress for Success
    5. Legal and medical terminology in the court reporting environment
    6. Captions
    7. Reporting the spoken words
    8. Nonverbal actions
    9. Exhibits
    10. Oaths
    11. Stipulations
    12. Reading back
    13. Distribution and ancillary services
    14. Notary requirements
    15. Transcript production and billing
    16. Tax related issues
    17. Reference materials
    18. Professional organizations and associations
    19. Legal citations
    20. Confidentiality
    21. Certification, testing and continuing education
       
    Reference Materials
    Internet resources
    National Court Reporter’s Association Code of Professional Ethics
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
     
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search



Criminal Justice & Criminology

  
  • CJC 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of crime, societal reaction to crime and the components of the criminal justice system, law enforcement, the courts and corrections. The student is introduced to the philosophical and historical backgrounds as well as their purposes and functions of each component. The major theories of crime causation, control and rehabilitation of the offender are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the structure of the criminal justice system.
    2. Identify the major components of the criminal justice system and their purposes.
    3. Describe the history and development of the American criminal justice system.
    4. Evaluate various models of criminal justice and consider the impact each has on those employed in the system and those processed through the system.
    5. Identify important sources of crime statistics and explain their importance.
    6. Summarize the trends in crime in the United States.
    7. Identify issues related to the administration of justice in the United States, for example, plea bargaining, police misconduct and punishment of offenders.
    8. Discuss the tension between public safety and civil liberties and the role that the criminal justice system plays in these opposing and important goals.
    Listed Topics
    1. Criminal Justice professions
    2. Limitations on the police, courts and corrections
    3. Landmark Supreme Court rulings
    4. Definition and categories of crime
    5. Measurement of crime
    6. Victim services
    7. Related systems effect on the criminal justice system
    8. The role of the criminal justice system in the larger society
    9. Punishment options in the criminal justice system
    10. Application of academics, math, science and English in the field of criminal justice
    11. Cross-cultural comparison of the nature and scope of crime
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 102 - Introduction to Corrections


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the U.S. correctional system. The philosophy, ethical dilemmas and methods of imposing sanctions upon offenders in the criminal justice system will be explored in depth. Exploration of the theories and practice in probation, parole, community-based services, jails, prisons and capital punishment will comprise much of the course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Summarize the origins and history of the American system of corrections.
    2. Identify the concepts, functions and changing aspects of corrections.
    3. Identify the various components of the correctional system.
    4. Distinguish among federal, state, county and municipal correctional agencies.
    5. Identify the various participants and their roles within the correctional system.
    6. Summarize the roles of the various levels of government and the various issues that impact the correctional system and society.
    7. Define the role of corrections and its impact on the criminal justice field and society.
    8. Interpret current political, psychological, sociological and economic issues confronting the correctional field.
    9. Differentiate among the different schools of correctional thought.
    10. Analyze the various sentencing alternatives and their impact on society.
    11. Discuss the philosophical arguments about the death penalty.
    12. Describe the major changes in the American corrections during the past few years.
    13. Identify the ways in which social and political forces affect the way organizations respond to a particular segment of the community.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical development of corrections
    2. Theories of punishment
    3. Goals of corrections
    4. Jails, probation, parole, intermediate sanctions and prisons
    5. Challenges relating to carrying out sanctions imposed by the courts
    6. Shortcomings of the U.S. correctional system
    7. Restorative justice and treatment related services
    8. Historical development of alternatives to incarceration
    9. Descriptions of and rationales for diversionary programs
    10. Terms and conditions for alternatives to incarceration
    11. Due process rights of offenders sentenced to community-based programs
    12. Procedures for revocation of community-based sanctions
    13. Rate of recidivism for offenders placed in community-based programs
    14. Roles and expectations of those who monitor offenders in alternative programs
    15. The future of community-based correction
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 103 - Gangs in America, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will focus on the philosophy and history of gangs in America through the eyes of law enforcement. Examination of a variety of street gangs (Crips, Bloods, Hispanic, Aryan) and the response from law enforcement.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Understand the evolution of gangs in America.
    2. Explore law enforcement approach to gang activity.
    3. Describe the Constitutional issues in gang investigations.
    4. Identify risk factors associated with gang recruitment.
    5. Explore key issues in gangs.
    6. Identify types of gangs and their genesis.
    7. Understand classifying offenders.
    8. Explore the prison gang phenomenon.
    9. Examine African American gangs, Latin gangs, outlaw motorcycle gangs and MS 13.
    Listed Topics
    1. What is a Gang?
    2. History of Gangs
    3. Theoretical Explanation of Gangs
    4. Socioeconomic Explanation of Gangs
    5. Gang Structure
    6. Female Gangs
    7. Criminal Activity of Gangs
    8. Gang Suppression
    9. Implications for the Future of Gangs
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 124 - Juvenile Justice and Juvenile Delinquency


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of delinquent and criminal behavior of adolescents as it relates to the history of juvenile justice philosophy and policy in the United States. Causations as well as treatment and prevention programs are considered. The proper handling and referral of juveniles involved in criminal and status offenses are discussed. Issues involved in the operation of juvenile courts and court related programs are studied. Juvenile drug addiction, mental illness and habitual offenders are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the evolution of the American juvenile justice system.
    2. Distinguish important legal, procedural and philosophical differences between the juvenile and adult court systems.
    3. Appraise juvenile crime in relation to total crime in the United States.
    4. Explain the various theories of delinquency and their policy implications.
    5. Explain and assess the goals of the juvenile correctional system and strategies developed for the prevention of delinquent behavior.
    6. Discuss case law and legal initiatives relative to the juvenile justice system.
    7. Explain various contemporary issues affecting juvenile justice and the system’s response.
    8. Compare the juvenile justice system in the United States with that of other countries.
    Listed Topics
    1. Delinquent behavior of juveniles and the measurement of juvenile crime
    2. The nature and extent of juvenile crime
    3. Landmark Supreme Court rulings
    4. How juveniles who committed serious criminal offenses are arrested as adults
    5. The role of school in delinquency causation
    6. Gangs and delinquency
    7. Juvenile drug addiction, mental illness and habitual offenders
    8. Programs for the treatment and prevention of delinquency
    9. Significant contributions to juvenile justice resulting from research in the field
    10. The role of law enforcement on the welfare of children
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
     
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 151 - Criminal Justice System Law


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course examines criminal, constitutional and procedural law. The basic constitutional rights applicable to those involved in the criminal justice system from arrest to sentencing are discussed. The development of public policy in the administration of criminal justice and the legal principles for determining criminal and civil liability are studied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Trace the history of the criminal courts from their respective foundations within English-based common law to the contemporary models that currently underlie judicial processes at both state and federal levels.
    2. Identify the fundamental philosophies, legal concepts and terminology that underlie the contemporary American court system.
    3. Discuss the importance of individual constitutional and statutory rights upon the criminal justice system in the United States.
    4. Identify the respective professional roles of those persons who work within the criminal court system.
    5. Discuss the major issues impacting upon the criminal court systems of today and project how such issues will likely affect the criminal courts in the future.
    6. Identify the ways in which social and political forces affect the way organizations respond to a particular segment of the community.
    Listed Topics
    1. The differentiation of criminal and civil law
    2. The application of the Bill of Rights
    3. Landmark Supreme Court rulings
    4. The standards of proof required in civil and criminal law
    5. A study of property crimes and crimes against persons
    6. A study of procedural law and the initiation and prosecution of criminal offenses
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 152 - Ethics in Criminal Justice


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of ethical issues and dilemmas encountered by the professional in the fields of criminal justice. Corruption, brutality and morality are discussed in relation to the duties in criminal justice organizations.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    Identify and explain the differences between moral and ethical theories and codes. Discuss a variety of ethical/moral issues, which characterize and define the different facets of criminology/criminal justice. Analyze the process by which criminal justice personnel engage in ethical and moral decision making. Identify how ethics and integrity influence risk in the criminal justice system. Apply ethical philosophies to solve problems. Discuss contemporary ethical issues related to the criminal justice system. Demonstrate thinking critically about the social construction of race, ethnicity and social class in crime and crime control with special focus on the United States. Discuss the history of issues relating to race, class, gender and ethnicity in the criminal justice system. Identify patterns in the roles of people from different genders and ethnic, racial, socio-economic backgrounds involved in the criminal justice system as victims, offenders and justice workers.


    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 201 - Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to criminal investigation procedures including theory, techniques and problems. Case preparation, investigative techniques, questioning of witnesses and suspects, and collection and preservation of evidence are studied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Appraise court rulings and their impact on investigative procedures.
    2. Describe the need for cooperation within and between law enforcement agencies in the area of investigation.
    3. Outline the impact of court decisions on investigative methods.
    4. Describe ethical dilemmas that investigators face.
    5. Appraise the importance of comprehensive report writing.
    6. Describe modern investigative equipment and technology.
    7. Summarize the investigation process.
    Listed Topics
    1. The basic functions of the investigator.
    2. Preliminary investigations vs. follow-up investigators.
    3. The cooperation required from patrol officer to investigator.
    4. The skills needed to be a successful investigator.
    5. Methods of interviewing and interrogating.
    6. The impact of court rulings and procedural law on criminal investigations.
    7. Ethics and investigations.
    8. Testifying in court.
    9. Technology and criminal investigations
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in that field.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/15/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 203 - Evidence and Procedures


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of the principles, duties and mechanics of criminal justice procedures in the United States and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as they apply to search and seizure, arrest and investigations. Also considered is the evaluation of evidence and proof with regard to kind, degree, admissibility, competence and weight. The course emphasizes rules of evidence at the operational level of law enforcement.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Summarize the rules of evidence and their origin.
    2. Describe the influence of court rulings on the rules of evidence.
    3. Explain the concept of admissibility of evidence.
    4. Outline the rules of procedure and their origin.
    5. Summarize the importance of comprehensive report writing.
    6. Describe the reasoning for the existence of rules and procedures in the criminal justice system.
    7. Outline the importance of proper methods of testifying in court.
    8. Discuss procedural processes utilized by the American criminal court system.
    Listed Topics
    1. The basic functions of the rules and procedures for the collection of evidence
    2. The description of evidence
    3. Rules of search and seizure
    4. Rules of interrogation
    5. The sequence of events from arrest and trial and the impact of rules of criminal procedure
    6. The impact of court rulings and procedural law on criminal investigations
    7. Ethics in arrest and prosecution of criminal offenders
    8. Testifying in court
    9. Civil liabilities for violating rules of evidence and rules of criminal procedure
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 204 - Criminal Justice System Organization and Administration


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course involving the organization and administration of criminal justice system agencies. Topics include functions and activities, planning and research, public relations, personnel and training inspection and control and policy formulation in criminal justice system agencies.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compare and contrast the management problems between public and private organizations.
    2. Describe the influence of politics on criminal justice organizations.
    3. Summarize the functions of management and administration.
    4. Compare and contrast the models of organization and organizational management.
    5. Outline how public organizations are funded.
    6. Describe the civil and criminal liability of managers in criminal justice system organizations.
    7. Describe the impact of landmark Supreme Court cases on management and administration.
    Listed Topics
    1. The general principles of organization and administration
    2. The functions of management
    3. The concept of leadership through motivation
    4. The concepts of efficiency and effectiveness
    5. The budget process
    6. The process of policy formulation
    7. Management styles
    8. Research in the area of law enforcement management
    Reference Materials
    A Contemporary text in that field.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/15/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 205 - Introduction to Forensics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of the scientific aspects of criminal investigation. Included are the study of fingerprints, the application of forensic sciences and the collection and examination of evidence. The student learns the capabilities of the advanced police science laboratory in the study of firearms, hair, fibers, blood, paint, tools, poisons and other material.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Appraise court rulings and their impact on investigative procedures.
    2. Describe the value of forensic laboratories.
    3. Summarize the importance of cooperation from everyone involved in the analysis of physical evidence.
    4. List the expertise of various personnel in the forensic laboratory.
    5. Describe the importance of comprehensive report writing.
    6. Outline the proper method of locating, packaging, recording and preserving evidence.
    7. Describe the importance of advances in technology.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of forensic science
    2. Basic procedures of a forensic laboratory
    3. Use of a microscope
    4. Examination of hair, fibers, paint, fingerprints, blood, tire and shoe prints
    5. Legal restrictions placed on physical evidence
    6. Role of the evidence technician
    7. Criminal investigation, methods and applications
    8. Types of computer crime
    9. Safety concerns involved in the collection of evidence
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in that field.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 206 - Police Operations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of law enforcement from an operational perspective. Law enforcement functions such as patrol, communications investigations, traffic, special operations and other line and staff functions are reviewed. Officer safety and duty-related stress are also examined.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of policing in America.
    2. Explain the role and organization of police in America.
    3. Identify fundamental law enforcement concepts, theories and organizational philosophies.
    4. Apply these concepts, theories and organizational philosophies to real world settings.
    5. Explain the powers vested in police and limitations on those powers.
    6. Describe the types of patrol and responses to various community problems.
    7. Explain the influence of politics on police operations.
    8. Describe the relationship between law enforcement agencies and other governmental bodies.
    9. Explain the importance and relevance of planning in relation to police operations.
    10. Analyze the exercise of police discretion.
    11. Recognize the ethical dilemmas that arise in police work and develop a framework for ethical decision-making.
    12. Explain the integral relationship between police work and American culture, including but not limited to race, class, gender, age, sexual orientation and disability.
    13. Evaluate major contemporary issues in policing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Assigning of manpower
    2. Concepts of strategic planning and evaluation
    3. Process of organization within a police agency
    4. Concepts of efficiency and effectiveness
    5. Functions and roles of individual units within a police agency
    6. Impact of officer safety on operational planning
    7. Service delivery from an operational perspective
    8. Community-oriented policing and problem-solving
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 207 - Introduction to Criminology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a survey of the patterns and trends in adult criminal behavior and juvenile delinquency analyzed in terms of various theories of such behavior. Students will also examine types of crime and the administration of justice. Material is presented describing the types and amount of crime in the United States. Characteristics such as age, race, gender and class of offender types are discussed. The interaction between society, the criminal justice system and the offender is examined. The current correctional practices that focus on the goals, organization, functions and operations of state, county and local correctional systems are examined. Theories on crime causation are analyzed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define major theories and tenets of crime causation.
    2. Distinguish among sociological, biological, psychological and integrated theories of criminology.
    3. Evaluate the empirical support for and criticisms of the major theories of crime causation.
    4. Describe the major policy implications of each criminological theory.
    5. Explain the historical development of criminology.
    6. Explain the relationship between criminological theory and practice.
    7. Evaluate relevant theories and policy prescriptions with a view to identifying more effective ways to address and increase social justice.
    Listed Topics
    1. The study of crime
    2. Measuring crime
    3. Crime and its costs
    4. Dimensions of crime
    5. Biological and psychological explanations of crime
    6. Social, cultural and economic sources of crime
    7. Social control and commitment to the law
    8. Learning to commit crime
    9. Criminal careers
    10. The organization of criminal behavior
    11. Community reactions to crime
    12. Deterrence, incapacitation, retribution and rehabilitation
    13. Reducing crime strategies
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 211 - Treatment Offenders: Issues and Strategies


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An examination of the history and philosophy of treatment, the structure of the correctional system and the legal basis for treatment. Consideration is given to the history of corrections and how that history has shaped treatment approaches. This course focuses on treatment modalities presently employed in working with offenders. This course also examines issues of public safety, security, and raises questions whether any treatment methods are in fact effective.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Summarize the development of the United States prison system and the integration of treatment into corrections.
    2. Describe if it is possible to both treat and punish within one system.
    3. Interpret some of the basic principles underlying directive and non-directive counseling and the shift toward direct approaches.
    4. Compare and contrast the ethical issues the counselor must confront as he or she attempts to serve clients while addressing the needs of society.
    5. List the techniques for assessing the likelihood that a client presents a risk of physical harm as well as the risk of injury should a client become aggressive.
    6. Describe the specific counseling approaches and programs that have been used with various offender types.
    7. List specific problems presented by special populations in prisons, such as the elderly, physically disabled and populations with mental disabilities.
    8. Recognize how programs are assessed for effectiveness through studies of treatment outcomes.
    Listed Topics
    1. The United States prison system and the movement toward treatment
    2. The concepts of the conflicting models of punishment and treatment
    3. The effectiveness of treatment
    4. The justice model and prisoner’s rights
    5. The rehabilitation and medical models
    6. Psycho-analysis and other non-directive counseling approaches
    7. Confrontive and directive approaches to counseling
    8. Counseling the substance abuser
    9. The sex offender and the mentally ill offender
    10. Confidentiality and the duty to warn
    11. Managing the counseling environment and the work place
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in that field.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/15/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 214P - Criminal Justice Administration Practicum


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 100 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: Criminal Justice/Corrections Major with at least 45 credits or permission of the instructor.

     
    Description
    This course is designed to provide the student with practical experience in a criminal justice project/agency.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Outline the placement process and role of the intern.
    2. Describe the daily operations of the criminal justice agency through direct observation.
    3. Appraise the importance ethical behavior in a professional criminal justice agency.
    4. Compare and contrast the difference between the formal and informal organizational structure.
    5. Describe the importance of comprehensive report writing.
    6. Outline the discrepancies between theory and practice.
    7. Appraise the role of leadership in the criminal justice agency.
    Listed Topics
    1. The placement process
    2. The preparation of a resume
    3. The role of the intern
    4. The objectives of the practicum
    5. Professional and ethical behavior in the workplace
    6. Overview of job descriptions in criminal justice agencies
    7. Qualifications for positions in criminal justice agencies
    8. Current job openings
    Reference Materials
    A contemporary text in the field.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CJC 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


    Course and Section Search



Culinary Arts

  
  • CLR 100 - Introduction to Foodservice


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    In this course the student will learn about the history of classical cuisine and the contributions of leading culinarians. Various segments of the foodservice industry and the organization of each type are studied. Future trends in the foodservice industry are discussed. This course also introduces the culinary program and various college resources available to students.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List the enduring contributions of historic chefs and foodservice pioneers to the industry.
    2. Research the advantages of belonging to foodservice support organizations.
    3. Explain various segments of the foodservice industry and employment opportunities in each.
    4. Describe typical hospitality operations, including lodging, foodservice and tourism.
    5. Discuss trends in foodservice and hospitality in terms of their likely impact now and in the future.
    Listed Topics
    1. Foodservice industry history
    2. Restaurant industry
    3. Lodging and tourism industry
    4. Gaming and casino industry
    5. City and country clubs
    6. Off and on premise catering
    7. Professional organizations
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 102 - Food and Beverage Service


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the basics of food and beverage service and dining room management.  Students explore various service options in banquet and dining room operations.  Emphasis is placed on the importance of guest satisfaction and customer relations.  The ethical and responsible service of alcoholic beverages will be discussed.  Students investigate technology available for the efficient operation of a dining facility.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify different styles of restaurant service.
    2. List the primary departments of a food and beverage operation.
    3. Explain different styles of restaurant service.
    4. Demonstrate a proper table placesetting.
    5. Create diagrams and checklists for dining room set-up and break-down.
    6. Describe the different types of alcoholic beverages, how they are produced and served.
    7. Discuss the importance of proper guest relations.
    8. Research the use of and importance of technology in service.
    9. Develop standard operation procedures for dining room, banquet, catering and buffet management.
    Listed Topics
    1. Restaurant service styles
    2. Service staffing
    3. Guest relations
    4. Dining etiquette
    5. Dining room management
    6. Dining and banquet room setup
    7. Responsible and ethical alcohol service
    8. Point of sale equipment and technology
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 105 - Supervision and Training


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces the students to the management functions of supervision, leadership, hiring and training staff in the hospitality industry.  Students explore various management theories and styles, with an emphasis on communication, motivation, training, team building and employee development.  Labor laws and regulations are reviewed.  Students develop food service training materials for a restaurant of their design.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Contrast management theory and styles.
    2. Differentiate between management, supervision and leadership.
    3. Choose appropriate management styles based upon circumstances.
    4. List the role and functions of a supervisor.
    5. Classify the operational functions of a foodservice operation.
    6. Identify laws and regulations related to management and supervision.
    7. Develop a foodservice organizational chart.
    8. Write a training manual for a food service operation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Management theory
    2. Role of manager and supervisor
    3. Leadership
    4. Motivating staff
    5. Organizational structure
    6. Hiring staff
    7. Problem solving / Decision making
    8. Conflict resolution
    9. Training programs
    10. Labor laws and regulations
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, access to a computer, printer and internet access.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 110 - Foodservice Sanitation and Safety


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course prepares students to work safely in a commercial kitchen setting while safely preparing food for the dining public.  Students follow the safe and sanitary flow of food through all stages of handling and production and establish procedures that ensure the service of food safe for consumption.  Students study government health codes and how to apply the principles of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) in the operation of a foodservice establishment. This course prepares students to pass the ServSafe Examination as provided by The National Restaurant Association Education Foundation proctored and administered at CCAC.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the principles of kitchen safety and the safe operation of kitchen equipment commonly used in a commercial setting.
    2. List the most common biological types of food borne illness including cause, symptoms and prevention.
    3. Identify physical and chemical contaminants to food service including corrective actions and prevention of illness.
    4. Assess potential food hazard throughout the flow of food and identify critical control points.
    5. Present corrective actions to prevent or eliminate food hazards.
    6. Demonstrate proper cleaning and sanitation procedures of food service equipment and small wares.
    7. List procedures to control and exterminate pests in the establishment.
    8. Pass the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation ServSafe exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Food Microbiology
    2. Biological, chemical and physical hazards
    3. Purchasing, receiving, storage and preparation of food
    4. Master cleaning and sanitation schedule
    5. Pest control program
    6. Kitchen design basics
    7. Safe handling of food service equipment
    8. Safety data sheets
    9. Crisis management program
    10. Federal, state, and local regulations
    11. Hazardous Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


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  • CLR 117 - Fundamentals of Culinary Skills


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: CLR 110  or previously taken

    Description
    In this course students will learn through lecture, demonstration and lab work the fundamental concepts, skills and  techniques of basic cooking procedures.  Basic knife skills and the preparation of stocks, thickening agents and sauces are emphasized.  The fundamentals of vegetable and starch cooking techniques are introduced.  Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Identify basic kitchen utensils and equipment associated with the culinary profession.
    3. Produce classical knife cuts to industry standards.
    4. Demonstrate the method of preparation for all major stocks and sauces.
    5. Explain the basic cooking styles of soups.
    6. Describe the basic cooking styles of eggs for breakfast cookery.
    7. Prepare vegetables and starches using basic cooking methods.
    8. Evaluate foods in terms of flavor, aroma, appearance, texture and presentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Kitchen equipment and tools
    2. Stocks, soups and sauces
    3. Knife skills
    4. Egg cookery
    5. Vegetables
    6. Grains
    7. Pasta
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 118 - Meat and Seafood Fabrication and Cooking


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 110  and CLR 117  

     
    Description
    In this course, students are instructed through lecture, demonstration and lab work on the proper butchery techniques of meats and seafood.  Students will apply dry, moist and combination cooking techniques to meat, poultry and seafood. Students will refine their cooking techniques of sauces, starch and vegetables to prepare complete entrees.  Safety and sanitation procedures are reinforced.  Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain and practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Fabricate whole chicken into portions.
    3. Fillet round and flat fish.
    4. List various cuts of meat and seafood and identify appropriate cooking methods.
    5. Cook various cuts of meat and seafood by dry, moist and combination cooking methods.
    6. Evaluate food prepared in class in terms of cooking technique, flavor, appearance and presentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Meat identification
    2. Seafood identification
    3. Poultry fabrication
    4. Dry heat cooking techniques
    5. Moist heat cooking techniques
    6. Combination cooking techniques
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 119 - Elements of Nutrition


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces foodservice personnel to the basic concepts of nutrition and their relationship to human physiology.  In this course, the student with limited science background gains an understanding of basic nutritional concepts and their relationship to planning and preparation of healthy, well balanced menu items.  Healthy recipe modifications, menu development and the preservation of nutrient values during preparation are emphasized. 
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the six classes of nutrients, their functions, food sources and recommended levels.
    2. Describe the elements of a nutritionally balanced diet.
    3. Identify the characteristics of diets associated with the development of specific disease states.
    4. Create a menu which contains the elements of a nutritionally balanced diet.
    5. Evaluate sources of nutrition information based on current practice and research in the field of nutrition.
    6. Demonstrate preservation and enhancement of nutrients in the preparation of meals.
    7. Modify recipes to address specific disease states.
    8. Evaluate the nutrient composition of a recipe.
    Listed Topics
    1. Nutrition and health
    2. Nutrition guidelines
    3. Micro and macro nutrients
    4. Protein, carbohydrates and lipids
    5. Vitamin and minerals
    6. Digestion and absorption
    7. Disease and nutrition
    8. Effect of cooking on nutrients
    9. Nutrition and menus
    10. Recipe modification
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 201 - Baking


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: CLR 110  or previosly taken

    Description
    In this course, the student is introduced to the techniques used in the production of various baked goods.  In the kitchen lab, a variety of yeast, sourdough and quick breads, cookies, laminated dough and pate a choux products will be produced.  Topics include product identification and scaling procedures, the proper use and care of equipment, sanitation and hygienic work habits.  Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Operate basic baking equipment and tools correctly and safely.
    3. Scale formulas accurately.
    4. Convert formulas into larger and smaller volumes.
    5. Explain baking principles.
    6. Produce quick breads using the muffin, biscuit and creaming methods.
    7. Bake a variety of cookies.
    8. Make a variety of pâte à choux products.
    9. Prepare various products from lean, sweet and rolled in doughs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Bakers balance scale
    2. Lean dough
    3. Rich dough
    4. Pastry cream
    5. Pâte à choux
    6. Cookies
    7. Quick breads
    8. Danish and puff pastry
    9. Pie
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 202 - Basic Garde Manger Techniques


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 110   and CLR 117  

     
    Description
    In this course, students develop the skills, knowledge and techniques of the “cold kitchen.”  In the kitchen lab, students prepare various salads, cold sauces, soups, sandwiches, appetizers and hors d’oeuvre.  Curing of meats and vegetables is covered.  Buffet showpieces such as fruit and vegetable carvings and ice sculptures are introduced.  Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Explain duties and type of work done in Garde Manger department.
    3. Prepare simple vinaigrette and mayonnaise based salad dressings.
    4. Identify a variety of salad greens and properly prepare them for salad production.
    5. Produce chilled soups, sauces, salsas, dips and pickles.
    6. Make various sandwiches.
    7. Prepare various appetizers, canapés and hors d’oeuvre.
    8. Carve vegetables and fruits to produce plate and buffet centerpieces.
    9. Develop a menu and organization plan for an hors d’oeuvre reception.
    Listed Topics
    1. Emulsions
    2. Chilled soups
    3. Side salads
    4. Entrée salads
    5. Pickles
    6. Sandwiches
    7. Hors d’oeuvre
    8. Salsas, dips and spreads
    9. Fruit presentation
    10. Ice carving
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 203 - Advanced Garde Manger and Charcuterie Techniques


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 202  

     
    Description
    Students in this course will learn and practice the advanced Garde Manger techniques of charcuterie.  In the kitchen lab, students will produce forcemeat items such as sausages, pâtés,  terrines and galantines, along with sauces and accompaniments to those items.  Cured and smoked meats will be produced.  Students will make and work with a variety of cheeses.  Proper techniques and the safe use of tools and equipment are emphasized.  Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Operate kitchen equipment commonly used in the production of charcuterie products.
    3. Discuss how advanced Garde Manger techniques can increase the profitability of foodservice operations.
    4. Explain procedures for curing, brining and smoking meat and seafood.
    5. Produce smoked and cured meat products.
    6. Describe the differences between the five basic forms of forcemeat.
    7. Produce pâté, galantines, terrines and fresh sausages.
    8. Explain how cheese is made.
    Listed Topics
    1. Garde Manger history
    2. Curing and smoking
    3. Sausages
    4. Forcemeats
    5. Cheese
    6. Vegetarian charcuterie
    7. Gelatin and chaud froid
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 205 - Purchasing Procedures


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview of the management function of purchasing supplies for a foodservice operation.  By creating policies and procedures, students learn the importance of purchasing in the operation of a profitable business.  This course emphasizes product specification, cost analysis, yields, controls and record keeping at each stage of the purchasing cycle.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss the importance of legal and ethical purchasing practices.
    2. Explain the use of technology in the purchasing department.
    3. Assess the advantage of value added product forms.
    4. Create procedures for inventory control and the requisition of supplies.
    5. Develop specifications, forms and records for effective and profitable purchasing practices.
    6. Evaluate potential suppliers.
    7. Write a food purchasing policy manual.
    Listed Topics
    1. Product specifications
    2. Inventory procedure
    3. Bid specifications
    4. Vendor evaluation
    5. Competitive buying
    6. Laws and regulations
    7. Ethical purchasing policies
    8. Receiving procedures
    9. Proper storage procedures
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Calculator, Access to a computer with internet access.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 210 - Pastry Techniques


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 110  and CLR 201  

     
    Description
    In the kitchen lab, the student will produce a variety of dessert pastry products. Production will include pies, tarts, cakes and tortes. Custards, mousse and frozen desserts will also be made. Modification of formulas to fit special dietary requirements will be introduced. Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Operate baking equipment and tools.
    3. Scale pastry formulas.
    4. Explain the differences between sponge and creaming style cakes.
    5. Produce cakes, tortes, pies and tarts from scratch.
    6. Make ice cream and frozen desserts.
    7. Produce stirred and baked custards.
    8. Create individual plated desserts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Creaming method cakes
    2. Sponge method cakes
    3. Pies and tarts
    4. Custards
    5. Mousse
    6. Frozen desserts
    7. Souffle
    8. Baking for special diets
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 211 - Menu Design


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    In this course students learn the fundamentals of writing and designing menus for restaurants and other foodservice operations.  Students gain an understanding of various menu styles including a la carte, cyclical and buffet.  Students learn to develop, convert and cost recipes and use that data to set menu prices.  The principles of nutrition for planning  well-balanced menus receive special emphasis.  Menu trends and the preferences of the dining public are explored.  Students will discuss ethical choices and truth in menu writing.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe menu styles and the evolution of the menu.
    2. Analyze a menu to determine needed equipment and technology.
    3. Write accurate and truthful menu descriptions.
    4. Identify restaurant trends as they relate to menu development.
    5. Choose menu items based on current nutritional guidelines.
    6. Write a standardized recipe.
    7. Cost a recipe to determine menu price utilizing food cost percentages.
    8. Create a variety of food service menus.
    Listed Topics
    1. Menu styles
    2. Menu design and layout
    3. Nutrition & menu planning
    4. Beverage menus
    5. Recipes development
    6. Recipe cost analysis
    7. Menu pricing strategies
    8. Equipment analysis
    9. Food service trends
    10. Menu ethics and legal requirements
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Access to a computer, printer and internet access.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 220 - American Regional Cuisine


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 118  and CLR 201  and CLR 202  

     
    Description
    In the kitchen lab, students will practice American regional cooking techniques, to allow them to transition from a basic to intermediate skill level. American Regional Cuisine explores the influence of native foods and culture along with the effect of immigration in the preparation of traditional and contemporary American specialities. The concepts of mise en place, timelines, plate presentation and teamwork are accentuated. Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Discuss factors that contributed to the origin of American regional cuisine.
    3. Describe foods, preparation methods and traditional dishes associated with the different American regional cuisines.
    4. Prepare a variety of American regional foods, which employ basic culinary principles, concepts and quality standards.
    5. Construct production timelines and prep lists.
    6. Evaluate food prepared in class in terms of cooking technique, flavor, appearance and presentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. New England cuisine
    2. Mid-Atlantic cuisine
    3. Atlantic Coastal cuisine
    4. Southern cuisine
    5. Southwestern cuisine
    6. Midwestern cuisine
    7. California cuisine
    8. Northwest cuisine
    9. Hawaiian cuisine
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 228 - International Cuisine


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 202  and CLR 220  

     
    Description
    This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected world cuisines.  Working in groups, students prepare, taste, plate and assess traditional dishes from around the world.  The significance of ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations and cooking techniques representative of these cuisines are highlighted.  Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Discuss the similarities and differences in the cuisines of the world.
    3. Explore the impact international cuisines have had on the culinary culture of the United States.
    4. Identify cooking techniques, ingredients and spices used in international cuisines.
    5. Produce food representative of international cuisines.
    6. Evaluate food prepared in class in terms of cooking technique, flavor, appearance and presentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Latin cuisine
    2. Classical French cuisine
    3. Southern European cuisine
    4. Northern European cuisine
    5. Middle Eastern cuisine
    6. Indian cuisine
    7. Asian cuisine
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 229 - Culinary Retail Kitchen


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 110 , CLR 117  and CLR 201  

     
    Description
    In this course students work collaboratively to plan and prepare food served to the public in a retail setting.  Correct application of culinary skills, plate presentation, organization and timing in producing menu items are stressed.  Students will improve their cooking skills and techniques to aid their progress to a career in a commercial kitchen.  Program uniform and knife kit are required for this course.  Students are expected to be well groomed in compliance with standards of  sanitation.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Compose a luncheon menu.
    3. Write a food requisition.
    4. Create a standardized recipe.
    5. Prepare menu items, following standardized recipes.
    6. Construct a culinary portfolio.
    Listed Topics
    1. Menu development.
    2. Food requisition.
    3. Menu production.
    4. Principles of service.
    5. Culinary journal and portfolio.
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Access to a computer, printer and internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 230 - Culinary Externship


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours 100 Total Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: CLR 203  and CLR 220  

     
    Description
    This course provides the student with an opportunity to apply the basic techniques developed in the classroom and laboratory to an actual foodservice operation for 100 hours of practical industry experience. Students will also apply organization skills to develop and produce food for service to the public through the “Culinary Corner.” Students are required to secure an acceptable worksite for the 100 hours of industry experience. Through this course, students will develop employability skills to assist in progressing towards their career in the culinary arts. Program knife kit and uniform are required for this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice the principles of kitchen safety and sanitation.
    2. Compose a luncheon menu.
    3. Organize a production schedule for that menu.
    4. Write a food requisition.
    5. Supervise the other students in class to produce the daily menu.
    6. Work as part of a team to help make the daily menu.
    7. Describe duties and responsibilities at the externship site.
    Listed Topics
    1. Externship site journal
    2. Culinary Corner
    3. Menu development
    4. Menu pricing strategy
    5. Kitchen production schedules
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, internet, program knife kit and uniform.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CLR 231 - Advanced Local and Seasonal Dish Preparation, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: High School/Vocational culinary program completion or six months food service experience.

     
    Description
    This course is a study of local and seasonal food preparation. Explores history and customs, serving styles, and preparation techniques of foods unique to selected American regions. Emphasis on practical cooking experiences. The class will foster self creativity through emphasising contemporary and classical cooking techniques. Plating, Timing, and Proper Utilization of food in restaurants will be taught.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Obtaining quality local and specialty food products
    2. Explain the importance of local seasonal foods
    3. Prepare food dishes using local and seasonal ingredients
    4. Recognize what drives today’s restaurants
    5. Minimize and control waste
    6. Practice healthier dining options
    7. Illustrate proper seasoning techniques
    8. Discuss prepared foods vs. fresh foods
    Listed Topics
    1. Local farms
    2. Seasonal food charts
    3. Types of restaurants
    4. Artistic food plating
    5. Food fusion
    6. Portion Control
    7. Food Storage
    8. Ala carte cooking vs banquet/catering styles
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook


    Course and Section Search



Dance

  
  • DAN 101 - Modern Dance 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to modern dance. Students will gain an understanding of dance as an art form. Various dance techniques will be explored to further the students physical and kinesthetic abilities. Aesthetic analysis of a variety of dance styles will provide an understanding of the communicative potential of dance. No prior dance training is required.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain dance as an art form.
    2. Show an increase in their muscular strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness and cardiovascular capacity.
    3. Demonstrate the communicative nature of dance and use it as a means of artistic expression.
    4. Prepare a paper analyzing the dance work in terms of form and content after attending a professional dance production.
    5. Choreograph a short dance solo.
    Listed Topics
    1. Flexibility exercises
    2. Beginning dance techniques
    3. Dance phrases to develop special and rhythmic awareness
    4. Analyzing choreography
    5. Tools of choreography
    Reference Materials
    Videotapes of Dance Masterworks.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/04/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 102 - Modern Dance 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAN 101  

     
    Description
    In this class, students will increase the technical skills acquired in Modern Dance 1. Muscular strength, flexibility and cardiovascular capacity will be increased. Compositional tools will be presented, enabling the students to use dance as a means of artistic expression.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate their knowledge of dance as an art form.
    2. Perform dance combinations at an intermediate level.
    3. Show an increase in their muscular strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness and cardiovascular capacity.
    4. Choreograph a short dance composition with clear thematic development.
    5. Prepare a paper analyzing the dance work in terms of form and content after attending a professional dance production.
    Listed Topics
    1. Flexibility exercises
    2. Intermediate dance techniques
    3. Dance phrases to develop an understanding of the use of body weight.
    4. Compositional concepts (Theme and Variation)
    Reference Materials
    Videotapes of Dance Masterworks.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/02/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 111 - Ballet 1, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course studys classical ballet technique and theory with an emphasis on proper placement and correct execution. Barre, Center and across the floor exercises will be included along with the study of ballet history.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to maintain body alignment appropriate to ballet while performing complex movement sequences.
    2. Illustrate appropriate use of time, space and energy when performing dance steps.
    3. Perform positions and patterns using principles governing classical ballet.
    4. Demonstrate an ability to perform ballet techniques with a sense of dynamics, musicality and artistry.
    5. Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the ballet terminology.
    6. Contribute and work cooperatively with classmates.
    7. Identify areas of ballet movement needing change through observation and practice.
    8. Identify the major periods of ballet history and training techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic ballet positions and patterns
    2. Basic ballet body, hand and feet placement in stances
    3. Balance, weight transfer, weight distribution and coordination
    4. Barre work including plié, relevé, battement tendu
    5. Center work (recapitulation of barre work in unsupported fashion)
    6. Pirouettes en dehors and en dedans
    7. Petite Allegro
    8. Grand Allegro
    9. Ballet history
    Reference Materials
    Videos of relevant classical ballets, internet, text books, field trips


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 120 - African Dance, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course will expose students to African culture by exploring the music and dance of the continent and the diaspora. The class will explore the music and dance from its inception to the modern adaptations that appear in today’s pop culture.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify common themes, forms and techniques used in African dance.
    2. Make use of the appropriate vocabulary to describe African dance and music.
    3. Demonstrate a variety of appropiate music and dance elements to create, improvise and perform original works.
    4. Identify the geographic region associated with a specific dance form.
    5. Recognize similar and different characteristics of African dance and American dance styles.
    6. Relate African dances and rhythms to historic events.
    7. Develop the ability to work cooperatively with classmates.
    8. Put to use feedback from instructor through observation and practice.
    Listed Topics
    1. Relationship of music and dance in the various African cultures
    2. Introduction to West African music and dance
    3. South Africa: Music and dance fueled a revolution
    4. North Africa: Female performers in the 19th century
    5. Sankofa: Dances that made it across the Atlantic
    6. Kutana: American music and dance meets Fela Kuti
    7. Azonto to Shoki to Gwara Gwara: Pop Culture dance
    Reference Materials
    Articles and videos of relevant performances, observations and documentaries.


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 130P - Dance Practicum 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    In this class there is the practical application of dance performance techniques. Students will participate in both student and faculty choreographed works, culminating in a fully produced dance concert in the South Campus Theatre. All aspects of dance performance, choreography and production will be explored and refined.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Choreograph a dance for public performance.
    2. Demonstrate a disciplined approach to rehearsals.
    3. Communicate with an audience through dance.
    4. Give and receive feedback and apply corrections.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to work as a team member with the production staff during technical rehearsals.
    Listed Topics
    1. Preparing the body for dance: stretching and exercise.
    2. Music selection and appropriateness.
    3. Choreography, space, time, force, and theme and variation.
    4. Mental and physical preparedness, focus and listening.
    5. Performing in front of an audience.
    Reference Materials
    Books, videotapes, music, tapes, and possible field trips to other dance companies will be used.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/01/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 131P - Dance Practicum 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAN 130P  

     
    Description
    This course is an intensive study in the practical application of dance performance techniques. Students will participate in both student and faculty choreographed works, culminating in a fully produced dance concert. All aspects of dance performance, choreography, and production will be explored and refined.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate intermediate level modern dance technique.
    2. Employ use of choreography to design dance routines.
    3. Show the ability to take a leadership role in the rehearsal process.
    4. Demonstrate the communicative power of dance through performance .
    5. Operate as a team with technical theatre students in the production of a dance performance.
    Listed Topics
    1. Refining dance technique
    2. Partnering techniques
    3. Tools of choreography
    4. Working in a collaborative art form
    5. The dance performance in front of an audience
    Reference Materials
    Books, videotapes, music, tapes, and possible field trips to other dance companies will be used.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 201 - Modern Dance 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAN 101 , DAN 102  

     
    Description
    This is an intermediate level technique class, students will increase their muscular strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness and cardiovascular capacity. Modern dance exercises will be presented to enhance the students spacial and rhythmic awareness. Choreographic for small groups will be explored.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of dance as an art form within a cultural context.
    2. Perform dance combinations at an intermediate to advanced level.
    3. Show an increase in their muscular strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness and cardiovascular capacity.
    4. Choreograph a short dance composition utilizing theme and variation.
    5. Prepare a paper analyzing the dance work in terms of form and content after attending a professional dance production.
    Listed Topics
    1. Flexibility exercises
    2. Intermediate dance techniques
    3. Dance phrases to develop an understanding of the use of body weight.
    4. Application of human animation software to choreography
    5. Compositional concepts (theme and variation)
    6. Influence of culture on dance.
    Reference Materials
    Lifeforms Human Animation software
    Videotapes of Dance Masterworks
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/02/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 202 - Modern Dance 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAN 101 , DAN 102 , DAN 201  

     
    Description
    In this class, students will refine their skills as dancers. Advanced level exercises will challenge the students physically and artistically. Performances techniques will be developed as well as choreography for large groups.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of dance as an art form within a cultural and historical context.
    2. Perform dance combinations at an advanced level.
    3. Show an increase in their muscular strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness and cardiovascular capacity.
    4. Choreograph a dance composition utilizing more than one dancer.
    5. Prepare a paper analyzing the dance work in terms of form and content after attending a professional dance production.
    Listed Topics
    1. Flexibility exercises.
    2. Intermediate advanced dance technique.
    3. Dance phrases to develop an understanding of the use of body weight and flow of movement.
    4. Application of human animation software to choreography.
    5. Compositional concepts (theme, variation, and counterpoint)
    6. Overview of twentieth century modern dance history.
    Reference Materials
    Videotapes of Dance Masterworks.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/02/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 230P - Dance Practicum 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAN 131P  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of the intensive study in the practical application of dance performance techniques. Students will participate in both student and faculty choreographed works, culminating in a fully produced dance concert. All aspects of dance performance, choreography, and production will be explored and refined.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate intermediate to advanced modern dance techniques.
    2. Employ use of compositional techniques to choreograph group dances.
    3. Demonstrate a wide range of movement qualities.
    4. Identify appropriate costume choices based on the theme of the dance.
    5. Demonstrate a mastery of dance performance techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Preparing the body for dance, stretching and exercise
    2. Music selection and appropriateness
    3. Choreography, meter, and movement
    4. Mental and physical preparedness, focus and listening
    5. Dance performance in front of an audience
    Reference Materials
    Books, videotapes, music, tapes and possible field trips to other dance companies will be used.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAN 231P - Dance Practicum 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAN 230P  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of the study in the practical application of dance performance techniques. Students will participate in both student and faculty choreographed works, culminating in a fully produced dance concert. All aspects of dance performance, choreography, and production will be explored and refined.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate advanced level modern dance technique.
    2. Employ use of compositional techniques to choreograph dances with clear thematic development.
    3. Demostrate the ability to dance with nuance and sensitivity to the music.
    4. Illustrate the understanding of rhythm, melody and mood of the music in dance.
    5. Coordinate production elements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Preparing the body for dance, stretching and exercise
    2. Music selection and appropriateness
    3. Choreography, meter, and movement
    4. Mental and physical preparedness, focus and listening
    5. Dance performance in front of an audience
    Reference Materials
    Books, videotapes, music, tapes, and possible field trips to other dance companies will be used.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


    Course and Section Search



Data Analytics

  
  • DAT 102 - Introduction to Data Analytics


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    In this course, students will examine the concepts of data analysis and how it impacts the business process.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of sound research questions, the identification and verification of data sources, the retrieval, cleaning and manipulation of data and the process for identifying the data elements that are relevant for a given audience.  An overview of the regulatory organizations that govern the release of data will also be reviewed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate decision analysis techniques and tools.
    2. Leverage database software to solve business problems.
    3. Explain how managers use data analytics to formulate and solve business problems.
    4. Differentiate among descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics.
    5. Present simple visualizations to address given scenarios.
    Listed Topics
    1. Decision analysis techniques and tools
    2. Database software uses
    3. Problem solving with data
    4. Descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics
    5. Data visualization
    Reference Materials
    Text, database, computer lab.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/25/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 105 - Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Suggested students at least qualify for MAT 108  and basic programming skills.

     
    Description
    This fundamentals course provides students with an overview of the different areas of artificial intelligence (AI). Students explore and practice with basic applications of machine learning theories and applications in different disciplines. Fundamentals of AI provides students with hands-on practice of basic machine learning focusing on different platforms used with machine learning and data set integration.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

     

    1. Articulate the differences between artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML).
    2. Discuss the differences between supervised and unsupervised learning.
    3. Examine the application of machine learning in interdisciplinary environments.
    4. Analyze different industry standard frameworks used with machine learning.
    5. Determine hardware options to create learning algorithms. 
    6. Develop basic projects utilizing machine learning libraries.
    Listed Topics
    1. Artificial intelligence (AI)
    2. Machine learning (ML)
    3. Supervised learning
    4. Unsupervised learning
    5. Harware options and uses
    6. Computer languages and machine mearning
    7. Data sets in machine learning
    8. Machine learning platforms and libraries
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved materials and textbooks.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 115 - Ethics of Machine Learning, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    Students will be introduced to ethical models and the impact of Machine Learning on the evolution of society and cultures. In this course students examine and determine Machine Learning practices and how the human-computer interactive elements work together to make ethical deicisions. This will prepare students to develop and implement Machine Learning in an ethical manner in their own careers. Futher, students in this course will gain an understanding of different forms ethical considerations can take in different disciplines.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

     

    1. Compare and contrast ethics and morales.
    2. Analyzie application of machine learning in interdisciplinary environments.
    3. Explain algorithmic biases.
    4. Implement ethical decision models for machine accountability.
    5. Assess cultural implications of machine learning.
    6. Produce case studies that analyze current machine learning issues.
    Listed Topics
    1. Ethical models
    2. Comparing ethics and morales
    3. Cultural implementations on societal perceptions of Artifical Intelligence
    4. Fairness and Human Computer Interactions (HCI)
    5. Interpretability across disciplnes
    6. Algorithms and Social Impact
    7. Machine mind and identity
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Culture Society and Citizenship
    • Information Literacy


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 119 - Python 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces computer programming using the Python programming language.  Emphasis is placed on common data types, control flow, object-oriented programming and graphical user interface-driven applications utilizing the standard library distributed with Python.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Design an algorithmic solution to solve a problem.
    2. Create variables of appropriate types to store program data.
    3. Formulate program instructions to perform computations.
    4. Implement selection structures in a program.
    5. Design repetition structures in a program.
    6. Create lists and other data structures to store large volume of data.
    7. Compose functions and integrate them in a program.
    8. Demonstrate Python built-in functions and modules.
    9. Apply object-oriented programming techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Computers and Programming
    2. Input, Processing, and Output
    3. Decision Structures and Boolean Logic
    4. Looping structures
    5. Functions and modules
    6. Files and exceptions
    7. Lists and tuples
    8. Classes and object-oriented programming
    9. Inheritance
    10. GUI programming
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook, current version of software, multimedia, internet and Web server account.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/25/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 129 - Python 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAT 119  

     
    Description
    Building on language foundations developed in Python 1, this second semester Python course focuses on the language’s powerful file processing and data manipulation tools.  Students will explore core libraries that allow programs to access operating system services, manipulate data of many types, interact with the user through graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and crunch out data metrics.  This fast-paced course is project-focused and builds not only Python programming skills but also best practices in object-oriented software design. 


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Load a python library suitable for processing files of a given type.
    2. Integrate an operating system process into a given program, making use of core python OS-related objects.
    3. Create instances of the core Python graphical user interface (GUI) components: buttons, text boxes, select boxes and images.
    4. Convey meaningful information extracted from a simple data set.
    5. Implement a user-centered design process for a Python program.
    6. Model the core phases of smart design with a simple, non-technical design problem.
    7. Convert a given algorithm written in English to Python.
    8. Design a new algorithm to solve a technical problem.
    9. Simulate a given human or system interaction in Python.
    10. Curate an online portfolio of working documented Python code from at least two course projects using a version control system, like GIT. 
    11. Effectively discuss Python skills and their applications to a potential employer during a practice interview.
    Listed Topics
    1. File types and python object adapters
    2. Looping structures
    3. File-based data stores
    4. Operating system interaction
    5. User-interface GUI components
    6. Data display GUI components
    7. GUI Design through user interview
    8. User-centered design
    9. Top-down design approach
    10. Psuedocode versions of algorithms
    11. Algorithm implementation in python
    12. Searching, sorting and traversal algorithms
    13. Monte Carlo simulations
    14. Simulation design phases
    15. Model and unit testing
    16. Technical interview preparation
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook and open-source resources.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/25/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 201 - Data Analytics 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DAT 102  

     
    Description
    Building upon the principles set forth in Introduction to Data Analytics (DAT-102), students will begin to develop a comprehensive approach to the application of data analytics in the solving of business problems.  In this course, students will evaluate the tools and resources available in terms of their appropriateness to complex business scenarios.  This course will highlight the collaborative nature of data analytics projects and the necessity for coordination across projects.  Students will conduct an initial data analytics project and create a collaborative report of their findings.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Examine decision analysis techniques and tools.
    2. Identify appropriate database software to solve specific problems.
    3. Implement data analytics to formulate and solve business problems.
    4. Collaborate to solve business problems using data.
    5. Use data visualization to address given scenarios.
    Listed Topics
    1. Decision analysis techniques and tools
    2. Database software uses
    3. Problem solving with data
    4. Collaboration in data analysis
    5. Data visualization
    Reference Materials
    Text, database, computer lab.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 202 - Data Analytics 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DAT 201  

     
    Description
    Building upon the principles set forth in prior coursework, students will engage in a comprehensive approach to the application of data analytics in the solving of business problems by employing the techniques frequently used in the discipline.  Emphasis will be placed on the different types of forecasting techniques such as sales, risk, retention and attrition as applied to a variety of industries.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Differentiate the data needs for the different forecasting techniques.
    2. Use appropriate database for specific forecast.
    3. Implement data analytics forecasting.
    4. Collaborate on using data for forecasting.
    5. Use data visualization to illustrate forecasts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Forecasting techniques
    2. Database forecasting
    3. Forecasting with data
    4. Collaboration in data analysis
    5. Data visualization
    Reference Materials
    Text, database, computer lab.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 203 - Data Visualization and Business Intelligence


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DAT 201  

     
    Description
    In this course, students will learn to organize, manage and analyze massive amounts of data on servers.  Students will utilize the tools and techniques required to present complex data in visually meaningful representations.  Students will learn how to organize raw data, to analyze and interpret data and to draw and present conclusions.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Design and implement a data warehouse.
    2. Demonstrate the fundamentals of data visualization.
    3. Extract and transform data.
    4. Build reports.
    5. Present and explain the results of data visualization.
    Listed Topics
    1. Data warehouse
    2. Data visualization
    3. Extracting data
    4. Data reports
    5. Data visualization presentation
    Reference Materials
    Text, database, computer lab.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 204 - R for Analytics


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DAT 102   and MAT 120  

     
    Description
    R for Analytics will guide students to the use of the R software platform for data analysis.  After exploring the fundamentals of the R scripting language and essential data structures, students will learn to manipulate structured data in R in preparation for statistical analysis.  Standard statistical data analysis techniques will be implemented in R such as means testing, variable correlations and linear regressions.  In addition to mechanical fundamentals, this course is rooted in building skills in sound data analysis thinking:  surveying data sets, generating compelling inquiry questions, conducting rigorous quantitative analysis, drawing conclusions rooted in reproducible findings and discussing the limitations of this analysis with a lay audience.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Execute essential operations in R-Studio including loading and viewing structured data files, reading data into R objects and manipulating data.
    2. Choose appropriate data storage objects and configure them for desired analysis processes given structured data in a variety of formats.
    3. Generate basic plots and descriptive statistics in R for all relevant variables in a given structured data set.
    4. Explain the fundamentals of linear regression analysis and write R scripts to conduct a straightforward regression analysis on a structured data set.
    5. Implement an end-to-end data analysis process.
    6. Generate exportable plots and reports using Shiny.
    Listed Topics
    1. Integrated development environment
    2. Structured data
    3. Vectors
    4. Objects
    5. Arrays and matrices
    6. Data frames
    7. Functions
    8. Regressions
    9. Plots
    Reference Materials
    The R software package is one of the most rigorously documented open-source data analysis systems available today. As such ample free online resources exist for both learning R fundamentals and conducting advanced analysis.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/25/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DAT 281 - Project in Data Analytics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DAT 201  

     
    Description
    This course is an advanced level project-based course for students in the Data Analytics program. Students will gain comprehensive experience and demonstrate their competence in applying the knowledge and skills learned in this program to real or hypothetical case studies. While students are encouraged to identify and work on projects in actual business or non-profit organizations, they may also work on equivalent hypothetical cases mutually agreed upon by the students and the instructor. The coursework culminates in a portfolio that will be used to evaluate student competencies in the program. 


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate different forecasting techniques.
    2. Use appropriate database for specific forecast.
    3. Demonstrate data analytics forecasting.
    4. Demonstrate collaboration on data analysis.
    5. Present portfolio using data visualization techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Forecasting techniques
    2. Database forecasting
    3. Forecasting with data
    4. Collaboration in data analysis
    5. Data visualization
    Reference Materials
    Text, database, computer lab.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search



Dietetics

  
  • DIT 102 - Dietetic/Foodservice Orientation


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This introductory course provides the student with an overview of both the foodservice and clinical aspects of the professional role of the dietetic technician and the dietary manager in a variety of settings. Field visits and guest speakers enhance content. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Adhere to current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice, Standards of Professional Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics (CNDT 2.1.)
    2. Use clear and effective oral and written communication (CNDT 2.2).
    3. Participate in professional and community organizations (CNDT 2.7).
    4. Perform self-assessment and develop goals for self-improvement throughout the program (CNDT 2.10).
    Listed Topics
    1. The profession of dietetics
    2. Dietetic education and training
    3. Dietetic credentialing
    4. Health care team
    5. Hospital organizations, health care agencies and the community
    6. Ethics and health care
    7. History of foodservice
    8. Contract service
    9. Production systems
    10. Foodservice operations
    11. Future of foodservice
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, audio-visual, field visits.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 103 - Nutrition Assessment


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: DIT 106  

    Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of the basic principles of normal nutrition.  Students will learn how to collect and interpret data to be used by a Dietetic Technician, Registered (DTR) or made available to a Registered Dietitian (RD) for interpretation.  This course includes completing diet histories and calculating nutrient composition of diets using a computer program and skin fold measurements. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Participate in advocacy on local, state or national legislative and regulatory issues or policies impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession. (CNDT 2.12)
    2. Perform specific activities of the Nutrition Care Process as assigned by registered dietitian nutritionists in accordance with the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice for individuals, groups and populations in a variety of settings. (CNDT 3.2)

     Listed Topics

    1. Assessment process
    2. Interviewing
    3. Data analysis
    4. Computer software for nutrient analysis
    5. Manual and computer assisted analysis
    6. Determining body composition
    7. Medical record
    8. Medical record documentation
    Reference Materials
    Texts, audio-visual, internet and text companion website.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 104 - Foods


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: DIT 105L  

    Description
    This course provides the scientific and consumer aspects of food.  A working knowledge of principles of food preparation is combined with menu planning, recipe analysis and costing. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform supervisory functions for purchasing, production and service of food that meets nutrition guidelines, cost parameters and health needs (CNDT 3.6).
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic principles of cooking and food science
    2. Menus, recipes and cost management
    3. Preparation of soups, stocks, meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, starches, vegetables, salads, salad dressings, dairy, cakes, cookies, pastries and quick breads
    4. Garnish and food preparation
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, audio-visual materials, Internet.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/21/2012


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  • DIT 105L - Foods Lab


    Credits: 1
    3 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: DIT 104  

    Description
    This course covers the study and application of the basic principles of food preparation which includes the study of soups and sauces, starch foods, meats and poultry, fish and shellfish, eggs and desserts. The course culminates in a final luncheon project planned and prepared by the class.  Proper use and care of equipment, sanitation and safe work habits are practiced.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Show cultural competence in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff (CNDT 2.9).
    2. Perform supervisory functions for purchasing, production and service of food that meets nutrition guidelines, cost parameters and health needs (CNDT 3.6).
    Listed Topics
    1. Soups and sauces
    2. Starch foods
    3. Meats and poultry
    4. Fish and shellfish
    5. Eggs
    6. Desserts
    7. Standardized recipes
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, demonstration, visual materials, Internet
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/21/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 106 - Fundamentals of Nutrition


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is an introductory course which focuses on the major nutrients, including carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, minerals and water. Throughout the course, practical application of information is emphasized.  Special topics addressed include: weight control, eating disorders and sports nutrition.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.

    This course is open to Non-Dietetic Program majors and is taught by a Registered Dietitian (RD).

     


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Access data, references, patient education materials, consumer and other information from credible sources (CNDT 1.1).
    2. Evaluate information to determine if it is consistent with accepted scientific evidence (CNDT 1.2).
    3. Use clear and effective oral and written communication (CNDT 2.2).
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to nutrition
    2. Six classifications of nutrients
    3. Nutrition through the lifecycle
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, audio-visual materials, textbook companion website
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 110 - Foodservice Production and Purchasing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course studies the tools of management as they relate to foodservice. Topics include safety, sanitation, master menu development, recipe standardization, food and menu cost analysis, facilities, planning, design and equipment selection for a foodservice department. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Modify recipes and menus for acceptability and affordability that accommodate the cultural diversity and health status of various populations, groups and individuals (CNDT 3.7).
    2. Use current nutrition informatics technology to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data (CNDT 4.3).
    Listed Topics
    1. Foodservice industry
    2. Types of foodservice operations
    3. Menu planning
    4. Production management
    5. Recipe costing
    6. Facility planning and design
    7. Equipment and furnishings
    8. Work improvement and productivity
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio-visual materials, computer
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 113 - Dietetic Practicum Seminar


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DIT 102 , DIT 104 , DIT 110 , DIT 114 , ALH 140   and DIT 125  
    Co-requisites: DIT 201P  

    Description
    Provided concurrently with Dietetic Practicum 1, this course presents a review of the material presented in Fundamentals of Nutrition, Foods, Foodservice Production and Purchasing and Medical Nutrition Therapy. In addition to providing didactic support for the practicum it enables the students to share and gain by their individual experiences. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Adhere to current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice, Standards of Professional Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics (CNDT 2.1).
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical Records
    2. Patient Care Studies
    3. Sharing of Practicum Experiences
    4. Site Concerns
    5. Discussion of Future Assignments
    Reference Materials
    Practicum Manual supplied by College
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 114 - Medical Nutrition Therapy


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DIT 103  and DIT 106  
    Co-requisites: ALH 140  

    Description
    This course introduces the student to the concept of modifying the general diet to meet various medical conditions. Principles of patient interviewing, analysis of the patient’s nutritional needs and the interpretation of food restrictions in menu planning and food shopping are presented. The physical, psychological and social needs of the patient are presented with emphasis on its nutritional consequences. This course includes the study of nutritional care of the patient with upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders, weight management, diabetes and related endocrine disorders, coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis, enteral feeding, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), liver disorders, renal disease, cancer, HIV/AIDS and feeding disabilities. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Access data, references, patient education materials, consumer and other information from credible sources (CNDT 1.1).
    2. Implement actions based on care plans, protocols, policies and evidence-based practice (CNDT 1.4).
    3. Use clear and effective oral and written communication (CNDT 2.2).
    4. Function as a member of interprofessional teams (CNDT 2.5).
    5. Refer situations outside the nutrition and dietetics technician scope of practice or area of competence to a registered dietitian nutritionist or other professional (CNDT 2.6).
    6. Perform nutrition screening and identify clients or patients to be referred to a registered dietitian nutritionist (CNDT 3.1).
    7. Perform specific activities of the Nutrition Care Process as assigned by registered dietitian nutritionists in accordance with the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice for individuals, groups and populations in a variety of settings (CNDT 3.2).
    Listed Topics
    1. Nutrition Assessment
    2. Nutrition and Illness
    3. Energy Management
    4. Diabetes Mellitus
    5. Gastrointestinal Disorders
    6. Enteral/Parenteral Feeding
    7. Complementary/Alternative Medicine
    8. Cardiovascular Disease
    9. Liver Disorders
    10. Renal Disease
    11. Cancer
    12. HIV/AIDS
    13. Feeding Disabilities
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, audio visual, case studies, textbook companion website
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 125 - Food Protection Certification


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course meets the requirements mandated by the Pennsylvania Food Employee Certification Act. Topics include: types and characteristics of pathogenic bacteria, most common types of food borne illnesses, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system and proper procedures for receiving, storing, preparing and handling foods. This course emphasizes practical application of safe food handling techniques to protect the public health. Students are eligible to sit for a nationally recognized certification exam which is a component of this course.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Adhere to current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice, Standards of Professional Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics (CNDT 2.1).
    2. Promote health improvement, food safety, wellness and disease prevention for the general population (CNDT 3.4).
    Listed Topics
    1. Biological aspects of food contamination
    2. Personal hygiene in relation to safe food handling
    3. Policy and procedure development to ensure food safety
    4. Review of federal, state and local regulations, including HACCP
    5. Preparation for national certification exam
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, internet, case studies, textbook companion website
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 201P - Dietetic Supervised Practice 1


    Credits: 4
    240 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DIT 102 , DIT 103 DIT 104 , DIT 105L , DIT 110 , DIT 114  and DIT 125  
    Co-requisites: DIT 113  

    Description
    This course provides an orientation to the practice of dietetics in a health care facility under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian (RD).  The principles of nutrition care and foodservice operations are observed and practiced. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Access data, references, patient education materials, consumer and other information from credible sources. (CNDT 1.1)
    2. Evaluate information to determine if it is consistent with accepted scientific evidence. (CNDT 1.2)
    3. Collect performance improvement, financial, productivity or outcomes data and compare it to established criteria. (CNDT 1.3)
    4. Implement actions based on care plans, protocols, policies and evidence-based practice. (CNDT 1.4)
    5. Adhere to current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice, Standards of Professional Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics. (CNDT 2.1)
    6. Use clear and effective oral and written communication. (CNDT 2.2)
    7. Prepare and deliver sound food and nutrition presentations to a target audience. (CNDT 2.3)
    8. Function as a member of interprofessional teams. (CNDT 2.5)
    9. Refer situations outside the nutrition and dietetics technician scope of practice or area of competence to a registered dietitian nutritionist or other professional. (CNDT 2.6)
    10. Demonstrate professional attributes in all areas of practice. (CNDT 2.8)
    11. Show cultural competence in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff. (CNDT 2.9)
    12. Participate in advocacy on local, state or national legislative and regulatory issues or policies impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession. (CNDT 2.12)
    13. Perform nutrition screening and identify clients or patients to be referred to a registered dietitian nutritionist. (CNDT 3.1)
    14. Perform specific activities of the Nutrition Care Process as assigned by registered dietitian nutritionists in accordance with the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice for individuals, groups and populations in a variety of settings. (CNDT 3.2)
    15. Perform supervisory functions for purchasing, production and service of food that meets nutrition guidelines, cost parameters and health needs. (CNDT 3.6)
    16. Modify recipes and menus for acceptability and affordability that accommodate the cultural diversity and health status of various populations, groups and individuals. (CNDT 3.7)
    17. Participate in quality improvement and customer satisfaction activities to improve delivery of nutrition services. (CNDT 4.1)
    18. Perform supervisory, education and training functions. (CNDT 4.2)
    19. Use current nutrition informatics technology to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data. (CNDT 4.3)
    20. Participate in development of a plan for a new service including budget. (CNDT 4.4)
    21. Implement and adhere to budgets. (CNDT 4.5)
    22. Assist with marketing clinical and customer services. (CNDT 4.6)
    23. Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to promote sustainability, reduce waste and protect the environment. (CNDT 4.7)
    Listed Topics
    1. Fire safety and accident prevention
    2. Sanitation and safety in the foodservice operation
    3. Recipe standardization and costing
    4. Inventory, storage and handling of goods in the foodservice operation
    5. Employee selection and evaluation
    6. Orientation of new employees
    7. Supervision and management of employees
    8. Special event planning
    9. Nutrition care assessment and planning for clients with disorders such as gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal and kidney, cancer, HIV\AIDS, over nutrition/under nutrition, diabetes and conditions requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition support
    Reference Materials
    Practicum Manual supplied by College.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 208 - Community Nutrition


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DIT 114  
    Co-requisites: DIT 209P  

    Description
    This course applies the principles of nutrition presented in Introduction to Nutrition and Medical Nutrition Therapy to the community setting.  The nutritional requirements of individuals in various segments of the life cycle are presented. Community programs that help meet the nutritional requirements of individuals throughout the life cycle are highlighted. Patient education techniques are presented. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform specific activities of the Nutrition Care Process as assigned by registered dietitian nutritionists in accordance with the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice for individuals, groups and populations in a variety of settings (CNDT 3.2).
    2. Provide nutrition and lifestyle education to well populations (CNDT 3.3).
    Listed Topics
    1. Public Health Nutrition
    2. Nutrition Education
    3. Health Care System
    4. Food Assistance Programs
    5. Pregnancy/Lactation
    6. Infancy
    7. Adulthood
    8. Aging
    9. Developmental Delays and Disabilities
    10. Physical Activity
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, printed materials, internet.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 209P - Dietetic Supervised Practice 2


    Credits: 4
    240 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DIT 114  
    Co-requisites: DIT 208  

    Description
    This course is planned to give each student the opportunity to apply principles discussed in Medical Nutrition Therapy in a community nutrition setting.  It is expected that each student will learn how community nutrition is similar to and different from clinical nutrition. Each student will be expected to complete a project suggested by the practicum supervisor. The project should be one that fulfills a need of the practicum. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Access data, references, patient education materials, consumer and other information from credible sources (CNDT 1.1).
    2. Evaluate information to determine if it is consistent with accepted scientific evidence (CNDT 1.2).
    3. Use clear and effective oral and written communication (CNDT 2.2).
    4. Prepare and deliver sound food and nutrition presentations to a target audience (CNDT 2.3).
    5. Participate in professional and community organizations (CNDT 2.7).
    6. Demonstrate professional attributes in all areas of practice (CNDT 2.8).
    7. Show cultural competence in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff (CNDT 2.9).
    8. Perform specific activities of the Nutrition Care Process as assigned by registered dietitian nutritionists in accordance with the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice for individuals, groups and populations in a variety of settings (CNDT 3.2).
    9. Provide nutrition and lifestyle education to well populations (CNDT 3.3).
    10. Promote health improvement, food safety, wellness and disease prevention for the general population (CNDT 3.4).
    11. Develop nutrition education materials for disease prevention and health improvement that are culturally and age appropriate and designed for the educational level of the audience (CNDT 3.5.
    12. Implement and adhere to budgets (CNDT 4.5).
    13. Assist with marketing clinical and customer services (CNDT 4.6).
    Listed Topics
    1. Provision of nutrition education to the public in general or to a particular life cycle stage
    2. Examination of nutrition education resources
    Reference Materials
    Practicum Manual supplied by College.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 210 - Human Resource Management for Dietetics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview of the organization and management of foodservice in the health care industry. Topics include: management of food production personnel, selection process, orientation and training of new and established employees, job analysis procedures, employee evaluation procedures and the principle of work simplification. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use clear and effective oral and written communication (CDNT 2.2).
    2. Perform supervisory, education and training functions (CNDT 4.2).
    Listed Topics
    1. Management and Leadership styles
    2. Communicating Effectively
    3. Positive Work Environment
    4. Orienting and Training Employees
    5. Developing Job Descriptions
    6. Recruiting and Selecting Applicants
    7. Interview Process
    8. Evaluating Performance
    9. Discipline
    10. In-Service Training
    11. Planning, Organizing and Controlling
    12. Decision-Making and Problem-Solving
    13. Delegating
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, internet, case studies.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 212 - Foodservice Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DIT 104 , DIT 110 , DIT 125  and DIT 210  

     
    Description
    This course provides information on the food management practices in the hospitality and health care industry.  Various foodservice systems, styles of foodservice, principles of kitchen design, menu merchandising, environmental and waste management systems and management of information systems are covered.. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use clear and effective oral and written communication (CNDT 2.2).
    2. Participate in quality improvement and customer satisfaction activities to improve delivery of nutrition services (CNDT 4.1).
    3. Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to promote sustainability, reduce waste and protect the environment (CNDT 4.7).
    Listed Topics
    1. Overview and Current Issues
    2. Marketing
    3. Quality Management
    4. Staffing the Foodservice Department
    5. Management Information Systems
    6. Computer Applications in Foodservice
    7. Financial Management
    8. Environmental Issues and Waste Management
    9. Security and Disaster Planning
    10. Time Management
    11. Stress Management
    12. Facility Design and Equipment
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, internet, audio-visual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DIT 214 - Dietetic Seminar


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of three semesters in the Dietetic Technician Program.

     
    Description
    This course provides the student with skills necessary to be successful in the completion of the national registry exam and job search process. In addition, this course will review the process of establishing a professional portfolio, making application for and maintaining registration status. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Adhere to current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice, Standards of Professional Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics (CNDT 2.1).
    2. Participate in professional and community organizations (CNDT 2.7).
    3. Perform self-assessment and develop goals for self-improvement throughout the program (CNDT 2.10).
    4. Prepare a plan for professional development according to Commission on Dietetic Registration guidelines (CNDT 2.11).
    5. Practice and/or role play mentoring and precepting others (CNDT 2.13).
    Listed Topics
    1. Portfolio Development
    2. Registry Exam
    3. Nutrition Services
    4. Food and Nutrition
    5. Foodservice Systems
    6. Food Management
    7. Resume Writing and Interviewing
    Reference Materials
    Study guide, registration exam review materials, CCAC Placement Office and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics portfolio guide.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/16/2018


    Course and Section Search



Diagnostic Medical Sonography

  
  • DMS 102 - Intro to Clinical Experience:Patient Care and Ethical/Legal Issues


    Credits: 2
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours 28 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance to the DMS Program, BIO 161 , BIO 162 , ENG 101 , MAT 108  and PHY 100  
    Co-requisites: DMS 105  

    Description
    This course is designed to offer the student a first hands-on clinical experience. In the clinical setting the emphasis is placed on familiarizing the student with imaging equipment controls, transducer position relative to the anatomy to be scanned, scanning techniques for the various protocols and patient care procedures. The lecture portion of this course presents the physical and emotional assessment of the patient, medical asepsis, body mechanics, medical emergencies, professional ethics, medical and legal issues as well as relative medical/legal terminology. The lab portion consists of demonstration and practice in these areas. The clinical portion of this course introduces the student to the healthcare setting and enable students to scan patients. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List basic needs of the patient.
    2. Identify all safety factors that must be considered when moving a patient.
    3. Assess physiological factors and select appropriate care in an emergency.
    4. Perform hand washing technique.
    5. Describe the purpose for reporting an incident.
    6. Describe the procedure for incident reporting.
    7. Describe the activities needed before, during and after the sonographic examination.
    8. Describe the properties of the ethical and legal parameters of the sonographer’s role in a medical setting.
    9. Cite the Scope of Practice for Sonographers.
    10. Explain the following medical/legal terms: informed consent, tort law, negligence, omission and commission, Respondeat Superior (Latin), assault and battery, assumed consent and Res Ipsa Loquitur (Latin).
    11. List the caring and communication techniques identified for sonographers.
    12. Explain how truthfulness and confidentiality are handled in the clinical setting.
    13. Perform the ancillary duties to the ultrasound examination.
    14. Provide a safe and clean environment to every patient present for sonograms.
    15. Demonstrate effective communication with the various hospital personnel in order to facilitate the the total care of the patient.
    16. Apply proper scanning techniques to create basic images of the heart and abdominal structures.
    17. Manipulate basic controls on the equipment while performing an ultrasound examination.
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic needs of all patients while in the Ultrasound Department
    2. Body mechanics
    3. Medical and legal terminology
    4. Ultrasound equipment set-up
    5. Professional ethics
    6. Medical and surgical aseptic techniques
    7. Basic scanning techniques and manipulation of the controls on ultrasound equipment
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, journal articles from library, video tapes and CDs located in DMS Lab and lab equipment
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 103 - Abdominal, Obstetrical and Gynecological Ultrasound


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 102  and DMS 105  
    Co-requisites: DMS 113C   and PHY 127  

    Description
    This course presents an intense study of the abdominal, pelvic and fetal structures that can be evaluated employing ultrasound as an imaging modality. The student is provided with information concerning normal ultrasound appearance of tissues, organs and systems within the abdomen, pelvis and fetus. Ultrasound images representative of normal states are presented and correlated with examinations performed with other diagnostic modalities. Technical information such as procedural and scanning techniques are discussed throughout the course. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply scanning techniques to image the abdominal, pelvic and fetal structures.
    2. Distinguish between the viscera of the abdomen and pelvis and the viscera of the fetus.
    3. Evaluate the normal sonographic characteristics of each organ within the abdomen, pelvis and fetus.
    4. Demonstrate effective communication with patients and significant support persons in order to facilitate the total care of the patient.
    5. Correlate clinical symptoms and lab values to the appropriate diseases and conditions.
    6. Correlate clinical symptoms and lab values of diseases and conditions to the appropriate ultrasound examination and to the sonographic characteristics of normal vs. abnormal structures.
    7. Compare the ultrasound examination with Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine imaging.
    8. Assess the size of anatomical structures with normal and disease states on sonograms.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning and imaging techniques of the abdomen, pelvis and fetus
    2. Sonographic characteristics of the anatomical structures of the abdomen, female pelvis and fetus
    3. Correlating sonograms with other imaging modalities
    4. Blood chemistry tests indicating pathology of specific anatomical systems or structures
    5. Relating the size of anatomical structures with normal and disease states as seen on the sonograms
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, Powerpoint handouts, videotapes and CDs located in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 104 - Cardiac Ultrasound


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 102   and DMS 105  
    Co-requisites: PHY 127   and DMS 114C  

    Description
    This course focuses on the ultrasonic investigation of the heart. Echocardiography is viewed from both an historical, as well as state-of-the-art perspective. The anatomy and physiology, particularly the cross-sectional anatomy of the mediastinal contents, are reviewed. Echocardiograms representative of normal cardiac anatomy are presented and compared with examinations performed by other diagnostic modalities. Procedural and scanning techniques are presented, as well as sonographic positioning unique to echocardiography. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify ways to provide an emotionally secure and quality treatment setting for patients and/or clients.
    2. Define the components of patient preparation as it relates to the echocardiographic examination.
    3. Scan standard 2-D views and the position and function of the cardiac anatomy.
    4. Transform images seen on 2-D echocardiography into M-Mode echocardiography.
    5. Expand images seen on 2-D echocardiography to incorporate color Doppler and spectral Doppler into echo exams.
    6. Identify the normal ECG/EKG pattern.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning and imaging techniques used in 2-D echocardiography
    2. Sonographic characteristics of the anatomic structures of the heart
    3. Principles and applications of transesophageal echocardiography and stress echocardiography
    4. Correlations of the role of echocardiography with the catheterization laboratory and the nuclear imaging laboratory
    5. Normal dimensions of heart structures and Doppler values
    6. Introduction to ischemic heart disease
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, Powerpoint handouts, videotapes and CDs located in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


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  • DMS 105 - Introduction to Cross-Sectional Anatomy for Ultrasonography


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance to the DMS Program, BIO 161 , BIO 162 , ENG 101 , MAT 108  and PHY 100  
    Co-requisites: DMS 102  

    Description
    This course considers the human anatomy through the evaluation of sagittal, transverse and coronal body sections. Organs and structures of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and extremities are presented and correlated with pictorial sections obtained through cadaver dissection. Cadaver pictorial sections are correlated with ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT) images. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the cross-sectional anatomical structures within the abdominal and thoracic cavity, female pelvis and the cranium.
    2. Describe the gross anatomy and position of the heart as seen in the anatomical position.
    3. Identify the heart chambers in cross-section.
    4. Apply cross-sectional techniques when scanning the abdominal organs.
    5. Associate the planes of the body with the position of the transducer.
    6. Compare the cross-sectional planes of abdominal organs to images created by MRI, CAT and ultrasound.
    7. Compare the cross-sectional planes of the heart chambers to images created by ultrasound.
    Listed Topics
    1. Gross anatomy of anatomical structures within the cranium, thoracic cavity, pelvis and the abdominal cavity
    2. The planes of the body and terms relative to cross-sectional anatomy as applied to ultrasound imaging
    3. Cross-sectional images of the head, thoracic cavity and the abdominal cavity
    4. Sonographic images of the head, thoracic cavity, abdominal cavity and of the heart chambers
    5. Related CAT and MRI images of anatomy in cross-section
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, Powerpoint handouts, videotapes and CDs located in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 113C - Ultrasound Clinical 1/Abdomen-OB/GYN


    Credits: 2
    120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 102   and DMS 105  
    Co-requisites: PHY 127  and DMS 103  

    Description
    This clinical course offers the student participation in the various steps involved in the ultrasound examination of the patient. The student shares responsibility with the abdominal, obstetrical and gynecological clinical instructor for scheduling, identifying and preparing the patient for examination. The student assures that patient preparation is properly followed for the given examination, scans the patient and develops skills in examination progression. The student gains skill and confidence in presenting the case before the interpreting physician. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize the abdominal, female pelvic and fetal structures.
    2. Apply proper interview techniques to elicit pertinent data from patient interviews in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    3. Gather pertinent clinical data from chart, X-ray and laboratory reports and other related areas in order to maximize available information on the patient prior to the ultrasound examination.
    4. Distinguish the various scanning planes and transducer manipulations in order to image, by ultrasound, the various anatomical structures of the fetus and the adult abdomen and pelvis.
    5. Create a diagnostic image of the abdominal, fetal and pelvic organs using the appropriate controls on the ultrasound machine.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning techniques of the abdomen, female pelvis and fetus
    2. Sonographic characteristics of the anatomical structures of the abdomen, female pelvis and fetus
    3. Correlating sonograms with other imaging modalities
    4. Correlating laboratory values with sonographic characteristics of pathology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 114C - Ultrasound Clinical 1/Cardiac


    Credits: 2
    120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 102   and DMS 105  
    Co-requisites: PHY 127   and DMS 104  

    Description
    This clinical course offers the student participation in the various steps involved in cardiac ultrasound examination of the patient. The student shares responsibility with the cardiac clinical instructor for scheduling, identifying and preparing the patient for examination. The student assures that patient preparation is properly followed for the given examination. The student scans the patient and develops skills in examination progression. The student develops skill and confidence in presenting the echocardiographic study to the interpreting physician. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Find pertinent clinical data from the patient interview, chart, X-ray and laboratory reports and other related areas in order to maximize available information on the patient prior to the ultrasound examination.
    2. Identify proper patient preparation.
    3. List the various scan positions used in echocardiography.
    4. Identify the normal structures in 2-D echocardiographic imaging.
    5. Transform 2-D imaging to M-Mode imaging.
    6. Calculate normal valve areas with the use of color and spectral Doppler.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning and imaging techniques used in 2-D echocardiography
    2. Sonographic characteristics of the anatomic structures of the heart
    3. The principles and applications of transesophageal echocardiography and stress echocardiography
    4. The correlation of the role of echocardiography with the catheterization laboratory and the nuclear imaging lab
    5. The normal dimensions of heart structures and Doppler values
    6. Introduction to ischemic heart disease
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 115C - Ultrasound Clinical 2/Abdomen-OB/GYN


    Credits: 4
    240 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 103 , DMS 113C , PHY 127  

     
    Description
    The student develops skills in scanning, interpretation of the sonogram and in recognizing normal anatomical variations. The student gathers pertinent clinical data in order to understand the total medical picture of the patient prior to the ultrasound examination. The student presents cases to the interpreting physician. The student becomes familiar with portables, surgical and special sonographic procedures and assists in these areas. (The student is assigned to a full-time clinical experience over six weeks.) This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop skills in recognizing normal sonographic anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis and fetus.
    2. Apply appropriate scanning technique to image the normal fetus for biometry, abdominal and pelvic structures.
    3. Elicit pertinent data from the patient interview and chart in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    4. Assess the needs of the sonographer and patient ancillary to the ultrasound examination.
    5. Develop skills in assisting the sonographer in the performance of special procedures and portable ultrasound examinations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sonographic characteristics of normal anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis and fetus
    2. Scanning techniques of normal structures of the abdomen, pelvis and fetus
    3. Patient interviews, patient privacy and ancillary duties of the ultrasound examination
    4. Laboratory values indicating normal physiology of the abdominal, pelvis and fetal structures
    5. Imaging modalities such as computerized axial tomography (CAT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine imaging in addition to sonography
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 116C - Ultrasound Clinical 2/Cardiac


    Credits: 4
    240 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 104 , DMS 114C  and PHY 127  

     
    Description
    This clinical course offers the student participation in the various steps involved in cardiac ultrasound examination of the patient. The student shares responsibility with the clinical instructor for scheduling, identifying and preparing the patient for examination. The student assures that patient preparation is properly followed for the given examination. Skills in scanning that have been developed in DMS 114C  Cardiac Clinical 1 and DMS 104  Cardiac Ultrasound are further advanced. Skills in patient scanning and examination progression are developed. The student gains skill and confidence in presenting the case to the interpreting physician. (The student is assigned to a full-time clinical experience over six weeks.) This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop skills to interact independently with patients from initial greeting and preparation until completion of the echocardiogram examination.
    2. Employ scan skills to acquire the required 2-D, M-Mode and Doppler images for a normal echocardiogram examination.
    3. Relate guidelines from the American Society of Echocardiographers (ASE) to identify wall segments.
    4. Utilize scanning opportunities to improve image stabilization abilities.
    5. Exercise manipulation between pulse wave and continuous wave Doppler as the patient condition dictates.
    Listed Topics
    1. Independent interaction with patients before and after the echocardiogram examination
    2. Exam protocols incorporating all of the components of 2-D, M-Mode and Doppler
    3. Techniques to enhance the quality of the echocardiogram.
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 125 - Vascular Ultrasound


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 102   and DMS 105  
    Co-requisites: PHY 127   and DMS 135C  

    Description
    Theory and practical application are combined to progress the beginning student’s ability to scan and read normal vascular examinations by semester’s end. The theory portion of the course consists of learning normal anatomy, sonographic characteristics and the hemodynamic principles of the peripheral vascular system, the cerebral vascular system and the vessels of the abdomen. Instrumentation, scanning techniques, audible signals made by normal blood flow and position of the transducer for each vessel are covered in the laboratory portion of the course. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Visualize the normal sonographic anatomy of the carotid, internal and external arteries.
    2. Identify ways to provide an emotionally secure and quality treatment setting for patients/clients.
    3. Define components of patient preparation as related to the vascular examination.
    4. Transform images seen on 2-D sonography into the spectral waveform of each vessel imaged.
    5. Expand images seen on 2-D sonography to incorporate color Doppler.
    6. Identify the anatomical location of the peripheral arteries and veins imaged in the human body.
    7. Define the vessels imaged in the abdominal cavity.
    Listed Topics
    1. Normal anatomy of the vascular system
    2. Scanning techniques of the various systems
    3. Spectral Doppler
    4. Color Doppler
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, Powerpoint handouts, videotapes and CDs located in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 135C - Ultrasound Clinical 1/Vascular Ultrasound


    Credits: 2
    120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 102  and DMS 105  
    Co-requisites: PHY 127  and DMS 125  

    Description
    This clinical course offers the student participation in the various steps involved in the ultrasound examination of the patient. The student shares responsibility with the vascular instructor for scheduling, identifying and preparing the patient for examination. The student assures that patient preparation is properly followed for the given examination, scans the patient and develops skills in examination progression. The student gains skill and confidence in presenting the case before the interpreting physician. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply appropriate scanning technique to recognize the sonographic anatomical structures of the upper and lower limbs as well as the neck.
    2. Elicit pertinent data from patient interview in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    3. Gather pertinent clinical data from chart, X-ray and laboratory reports and other related areas in order to maximize available information on the patient prior to the ultrasound examination.
    4. Discriminate between diagnostic and non-diagnostic sonographic images in order to progress the examination to its logical conclusion utilizing the various scanning positions and techniques.
    5. Correlate the use of the various controls on the ultrasound machine to diagnostic sonographic images.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning techniques and normal hemodynamics of the carotid artery and peripheral vascular system
    2. Sonographic characteristics of normal vessels using color Doppler, Doppler spectral analysis and 2-D imaging
    3. Correlation of sonograms with other imaging modalities
    4. Correlate laboratory values and clinical symptoms with sonographic characteristics of pathology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • DMS 137C - Ultrasound Clinical 2/Vascular


    Credits: 4
    240 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 125 , DMS 135C  and PHY 127  

     
    Description
    This clinical course offers the student progressively greater participation in the various steps involved in the vascular examination of the patient. Skills in scanning that have been developed in previous clinical courses are utilized. The student develops skills in recognizing normal anatomy as well as pathology. Progression of the examination is performed by the student under the direct supervision of the clinical instructor. The student continues to gather pertinent clinical information in order to understand the total medical picture of the patient prior to the vascular examination. The student is introduced to and assist in portable examinations and special procedures. The student gains skill and confidence in presenting the case before the interpreting physician. (The student is assigned to a full-time clinical experience over six weeks.) This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize normal anatomy of the extremity veins.
    2. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize normal anatomy of the extremity arteries.
    3. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize normal anatomy of the carotid arteries.
    4. Elicit pertinent data from patient interview and chart in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    5. Assist sonographers in the performance of special procedures and portable ultrasound examinations.
    6. Apply theory and scanning techniques to progress the examination to its conclusion.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sonographic characteristics of normal anatomy vascular systems
    2. Scanning techniques of normal structures within the vascular systems
    3. Patient interview, patient privacy and ancillary duties to the ultrasound examination
    4. Laboratory values indicating normal physiology of the abdominal, pelvis and fetal structures
    5. Other imaging modalities in addition to sonography to image vascular structures
    Reference Materials
    Text books, library resources, journals and Student Clinical Manual.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


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  • DMS 203 - Advanced Abdomen and Small Parts Ultrasound


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 115C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 210  and DMS 223C  

    Description
    This course will be divided into two learning modules. The first module lasting 5 weeks will consist of lecture and lab covering normal and abnormal ultrasound appearance of the thyroid, breast, scrotum and prostate. Scanning techniques of those structures will also be covered. The second module lasting 10 weeks will consist of lecture only and cover pathological conditions of the abdominal organs. Ultrasound images representative of disease states of organs and systems of the abdominal cavity will be presented and correlated with examinations performed with other diagnostic modalities. Relevant histologic aspects of various pathological conditions will be discussed and correlated with their acoustical properties and ultrasound characteristics. Clinical features, laboratory data and the pathophysiology of pertinent diseases will be presented. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Synthesize the clinical signs and symptoms with pathology of the abdominal organs as well as the thyroid, breast, parathyroid, scrotum and prostate.
    2. Identify and evaluate the pertinent laboratory data relevant to pathological conditions of the following areas; abdominal organs, thyroid, parathyroid, breast, scrotum and prostate.
    3. Give a differential diagnosis of liver pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    4. Give a differential diagnosis of biliary pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    5. Give a differential diagnosis of pancreatic pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    6. Give a differential diagnosis of renal pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    7. Give a differential diagnosis of thyroid and scrotal pathology using the sonographic characteristics and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    8. Apply proper scanning technique to image the thyroid gland.
    Listed Topics
    1. Liver disease
    2. Gallbladder disease
    3. Renal disease
    4. Pancreatic disease
    5. Breast imaging; x-ray and ultrasound
    6. Prostate biopsy
    7. Scanning techniques of the thyroid, breast, scrotum and prostate
    8. Sonographic characteristics of pathology of the abdominal organs
    9. Sonographic characteristics of pathology of the thyroid and scrotum
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, journal articles, videotapes and CD’s located in the DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 204 - Advanced Cardiac Ultrasound


    Credits: 5
    5 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 116C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 210  and DMS 224C  

    Description
    This course is for ultrasound students specializing in echocardiography. Abnormal cardiac anatomy and physiology will be studied. M-mode, two-dimensional, continuous wave, pulsed wave, and color flow doppler will be correlated with pathologies. Echocardiographic tapes and case studies will be presented and correlated with clinical features of cardiac pathology. Cardiac surgical procedures and pharmacology will be studied. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compile appropriate echocardiographic images and data for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disorders including: coronary artery disease, acquired valvular heart disease, endocarditis, pericarditis myocarditis, cardiomyopathies, congenital heart disease and disease of the aorta.
    2. Scrutinize obtained echocardiographic data to assure that the exam was diagnostic for the written order of the exam.
    3. Correlate information obtained from 2-D imaging with quantitative m-mode and Doppler values to indicate pathology of the heart.
    4. Compile the quantitative and qualitative echocardiographic information to grade the severity of indicated cardiac disease.
    5. Generate a report page that accurately depicts the level of cardiac function.
    Listed Topics
    1. Abnormal cardiac anatomy and physiology
    2. Cardiac pharmacology
    3. Coronary artery disease
    4. Valvular heart disease
    5. Endocarditis, pericarditis and myocarditis
    6. Cardiac masses
    7. Cardiomyopathies
    8. Congenital heart disease
    9. Diseases of the aorta
    10. Traumatic heart disease
    11. Cardiac embryology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videotapes and CD’s located in DMS lab.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 207 - Advanced Vascular Ultrasound


    Credits: 5
    5 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 137C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 210  and DMS 235C  

    Description
    This is a continuation of Vascular Ultrasound in which the emphasis is placed on pathological states of the peripheral vascular, cerebrovascular and abdominal vascular systems. This course will offer valuable information on Doppler vascular imaging to sonographers planning to sit for the vascular boards. Technical information such as spectral analysis in Doppler, hemodynamics of the circulatory system as well as scanning techniques and protocols will be covered. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the abnormal hemodynamics of the cerebral, peripheral and abdominal vascular systems.
    2. Distinguish the abnormal sonographic characteristics of the cerebral, peripheral and abdominal vascular systems from normal vessels using 2-D scanning techniques.
    3. Scan for and differentiate between normal and abnormal vessels within the vascular systems.
    4. Analyze and interpret the abnormal sonographic findings of the spectral Doppler waveform of the cerebral, peripheral and abdominal vascular systems.
    5. Analyze and interpret the abnormal color spectral image of the cerebral, peripheral and abdominal vascular systems.
    6. Identify the normal and abnormal vasculature of the female pelvis and male genitalia.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pathology causing abnormal hemodynamics of blood flow through the vascular system
    2. Scanning techniques and sonographic characteristics of pathology of the various vascular systems
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videotapes and CD’s in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • DMS 210 - Ultrasound Instrumention and Quality Control


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 127 , DMS 115C , DMS 116C , DMS 137C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 203 , DMS 204 , DMS 207 , DMS 223C , DMS 224C  and DMS 235C  

    Description
    This is a course which combines theory and practice in ultrasound instrumentation and quality control. Topics include functions of the components of processing, scan converter displays, image and display techniques, film and methods of permanent image recording, ultrasound transducers, operating standards, equipment calibration, resolution, gray scale photography and film critique. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Locate and identify sensitivity controls.
    2. Identify the components of real time scanners and explain their contribution to the ultrasound unit’s operation.
    3. Comprehend the Doppler Principle Theory and the proper application.
    4. Identify proper Doppler modality selection and its application towards diagnostic ultrasound.
    5. Employ multiple scanning modalities to relate the complementary information that can be obtained.
    6. Scrutinize ultrasound images to evaluate for image artifacts.
    7. Assess the potential for bioeffects of the use ultrasound, if adequate safety practices are not followed.
    Listed Topics
    1. Applications for the use of ultrasound test objects
    2. The location and application of ultrasound unit sensitivity controls
    3. The physics associated with the ultrasound unit sensitivity controls
    4. The pitfalls associated with artifacts in ultrasound imaging
    5. The potential for bioeffects in ultrasound imaging
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks , MO disk and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 223C - Ultrasound Clinical 3/Abdomen-OB/GYN


    Credits: 6
    360 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 115C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 203 , DMS 210  

    Description
    This course will offer the student an opportunity to refine skills in scanning, interpretation of the sonogram and in recognizing normal anatomical variations as well as pathology. The student will be able to gather pertinent clinical data in order to understand the total medical picture of the patient prior to the ultrasound examination. The student will be responsible for becoming familiar with portable, surgical, and special sonographic procedures and will assist in these areas. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply appropriate interviewing techniques to elicit pertinent data from patient interview in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    2. Identify and evaluate the pertinent laboratory data from charts, x-ray reports and other related areas in order to understand the total medical picture prior to the ultrasound examination.
    3. Present case findings to the interpreting physician.
    4. Synthesize sonographic images of pathology of the abdominal organs with control settings on the ultrasound machine and clinical signs and symptoms.
    5. Apply appropriate scanning techniques to visualize normal and abnormal structures in the abdomen, female pelvis and the fetus.
    6. Apply appropriate skills to carry-out physicians orders for sonograms using correct protocols and progress the examination to conclusion.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning techniques of the abdominal organs
    2. Scanning techniques of the pelvic organs
    3. Scanning techniques of pathology of the abdominal and pelvic organs
    4. Real time examinations of the fetus
    5. Scanning techniques of special procedures
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 224C - Ultrasound Clinical 3/Cardiac


    Credits: 6
    360 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 116C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 204 , DMS 210  

    Description
    This clinical course offers the student progressively greater participation in the various steps involved in the cardiac ultrasound examination of the patient. The student will share with the clinical instructor responsibilities for scheduling, identifying, and preparing the patient for examination. The student will assure that patient preparation is properly followed for the given examination. Skills in scanning that have been developed in previous lecture/lab and clinical courses will be utilized. Progression of the examination will be performed by the student under direct supervision of the clinical instructor. Competencies in advanced echocardiographic techniques will be developed. Skill and confidence in presenting the echocardiographic examination to the interpreting physician will be developed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compile appropriate echocardiographic images and data for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disorders including: coronary artery disease, acquired valvular heart disease, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiomyopathies, congenital heart disease and disease of the aorta.
    2. Scrutinize obtained echocardiographic data to assure that the exam was diagnostic for the written order of the examination.
    3. Combine information obtained from 2-D imaging with quantitative m-mode and Doppler values to indicate pathology of the heart.
    4. Compile the quantitative and qualitative echocardiographic information to grade the severity of indicated cardiac disease.
    5. Generate a report page that accurately depicts the level of cardiac function.
    Listed Topics
    1. Abnormal cardiac anatomy and physiology
    2. Cardiac pharmacology
    3. Coronary artery disease
    4. Valvular heart disease
    5. Endocarditis, pericarditis and myocarditis
    6. Cardiac masses
    7. Cardiomyopathies
    8. Congenital heart disease
    9. Diseases of the aorta
    10. Traumatic heart disease
    11. Cardiac embryology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 225C - Ultrasound Clinical 4/Abdomen-OB/GYN


    Credits: 6
    360 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 203 , DMS 210 , DMS 223C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 228 , DMS 227  

    Description
    The course will offer the student an opportunity to refine skills in scanning, interpretation of the sonogram and recognize normal anatomical variations and pathology. The student will be able to gather pertinent clinical data in order to understand the total medical picture of the patient prior to the ultrasound examination. The student will become familiar with portable, surgical, and special sonographic procedures, will assist in these areas and will be encouraged to seek additional experience in carotid Doppler and peripheral vascular Doppler examinations. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply appropriate scanning technique to demonstrate and recognize sonographic pathological conditions of the abdominal and pelvic regions as well as the fetus.
    2. Elicit pertinent data from patient interview in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    3. Gather pertinent clinical data from chart, x-ray reports, laboratory reports and other related areas in order to understand the total medical picture prior to the ultrasound examination.
    4. Associate clinical signs and symptoms with sonographic images of abnormal structures of the abdomen, female pelvis and fetus.
    5. Scan and progress the examination independent of clinical instructor.
    6. Scan and progress the examination using correct protocols.
    7. Scan and complete the examination within the expected time.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning techniques during special procedures
    2. Scanning techniques during portables
    3. Sonographic characteristics of pathology of the abdominal organs
    4. Sonographic characteristics of pathology of the fetus
    5. Sonographic characteristics of pathology of the female pelvic structures
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 226C - Ultrasound Clinical 4/Cardiac


    Credits: 6
    360 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 204 , DMS 210 , DMS 224C  
    Co-requisites:   DMS 228 

    Description
    This clinical course will offer the student increased participation in the cardiac ultrasound examination of the patient. The student will share with the clinical instructor responsibility for scheduling, identifying and preparing the patient for examination. The student will assure that the patient preparation was properly followed for the given examination. Skills in scanning that have been developed in previous lectures/labs and clinical courses will be utilized. Progression of the examination will be performed by the student under direct supervision of the clinical instructor. Competencies in advanced echocardiographic techniques will be developed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prioritize patient scheduling to ensure that patient needs that are being met.
    2. Independently interact with patients from initial greeting & preparation until completion of the echo exam.
    3. Assess the quantitative and qualitative results of the echocardiogram for the presence/degree of following cardiac pathologies using echocardiography: coronary artery disease, acquired heart disease, valvular stenosis, regurgitation, diseases of the myocardium, cardiomyopathies, diseases of the pericardium, diseases of the endocardium, congenital heart disease in the adult and diseases of the aorta.
    4. Classify the severity of identified cardiac pathology.
    5. Weigh the information obtained from the exam to determine if the cardiologist should be contacted.
    Listed Topics
    1. The ability to prioritize the patient exam schedule
    2. The ability to work independently for the entire echocardiogram exam
    3. Recognizing and properly interrogating cardiac pathology
    4. Grading the severity of cardiac pathology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and student clinical manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 227 - Advanced OB/GYN Ultrasound


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 203 , DMS 210 , DMS 223C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 228  and DMS 225C  

    Description
    This course will provide students specializing in the general tract with information concerning the abnormal ultrasound appearance of tissues, organs and systems of the female pelvis and fetus. Ultrasound images representative of disease states will be presented and correlated with examinations performed with other diagnostic modalities. Relevant histologic aspects of various pathological conditions as well as congenital anomalies of the fetus will be discussed and correlated with their acoustical properties and ultrasound characteristics. Clinical features, laboratory data and the pathophysiology of pertinent diseases will be presented. Technical information, such as procedural and scanning techniques will be discussed throughout the course. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the signs and symptoms of a threatened abortion.
    2. Explain the development and function of the placenta.
    3. Evaluate the clinical signs and sonographic characteristics of IUGR.
    4. Differentiate the sonographic images of congenital anomalies from normal of the following fetal structures: fetal brain, skeletal structures, abdominal wall and kidney.
    5. Differentiate the signs, clinical symptoms and sonographic characteristics of benign from malignant neoplasm of the ovary.
    6. Assess the signs, symptoms and sonographic characteristics of pelvic inflammatory disease to narrow the differential diagnosis.
    7. Assess the signs, symptoms and sonographic characteristics of ectopic pregnancy.
    Listed Topics
    1. Fetal congenital anomalies and their sonographic characteristics
    2. Sonographic characteristics of benign/malignant ovarian neoplasm
    3. Sonographic characteristics of endometrial benign/malignant neoplasm
       
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resouces, journal articles, videotapes and CD’s located in DMS lab.

     
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 228 - Doppler Vascular Sonography


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 203 , DMS 223C  or DMS 224C , DMS 204 , DMS 210  
    Co-requisites: DMS 225C  and DMS 227  or DMS 226C  

    Description
    This course will combine theory and practical application to advance the technical skills of both the experienced and the new sonographer. This course will offer valuable information to those sonographers planning to sit for the RVT boards, and introduce the new sonographers to Doppler Vascular Imaging. Normal as well as pathological states of the peripheral and cerebrovascular system will be covered. Technical information such as protocols, spectral analysis in Doppler and scanning techniques will be taught as well as hemodynamics of the circulatory system and the physics and instrumentation of Doppler. During the practical lab experience the student applies classroom learning to scanning problems. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List and identify the major vessels in the human peripheral vascular system.
    2. Define and explain the location and function of the major vascular vessels in the human body.
    3. Relate the anatomic presentation of vascular vessels to the physiologic performance of the vessel.
    4. Scrutinize qualitative and quantitative information obtained in the vascular exam and deduce the diagnostic validity of the information.
    5. Compile qualitative and quantitative information obtained in the vascular exam.
    6. Assess qualitative and quantitative information obtained in the vascular exam and determine the extent of pathology in the patient that was examined.
    7. Assess practices that deal with ethical issues encountered in the vascular ultrasound profession.
    Listed Topics
    1. The physical location of the major vessels of the peripheral vascular system
    2. The function of the major vessels of the peripheral vascular system
    3. The direct and indirect testing available for the detection of peripheral vascular disease
    4. The pathologies encountered in peripheral vascular testing
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videotapes and CD’s located in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • DMS 235C - Ultrasound Clinical 3/Vascular


    Credits: 6
    360 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 137C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 207 , DMS 210  

    Description
    This clinical course offers the student experience in developing clinical skills in recognizing pathology or abnormal anatomy. The student will have the opportunity to maintain skills previously learned and to continue to develop new scanning skills. The student will continue to develop skills in the progression and completion of the examination. The student will begin to become independent of the clinical supervisor in the performance of the ultrasound examination. The student will assist in portable examinations and special procedures. Gaining skills and confidence in presenting the case before the interpreting physician will continue during this clinical experience.(Three full-time days per week). This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize abnormal anatomy of the extremity veins.
    2. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize abnormal anatomy of the carotid arteries.
    3. Apply proper scanning technique to visualize abnormal anatomy of the extremity arteries.
    4. Analyze pertinent data from patient interview and chart in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    5. Assist in the performance of special procedures and portable ultrasound examinations.
    6. Correlate anatomical images of pathology of the vascular systems with clinical signs and symptoms.
    7. Correlate the sonographic characteristics with pathology of the vascular system.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sonographic characteristics of normal and abnormal anatomy of the extremity veins, carotid arteries and extremity arteries
    2. Scanning techniques of normal and abnormal structures of the vascular systems
    3. Patient interview, patient privacy and ancillary duties to the ultrasound examination
    4. Laboratory values indicating normal physiology of the vascular structures
    5. Other imaging modalities in addition to sonography used to image the vascular structures
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and Student Clinical Manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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