Apr 14, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

English Writing & Literature

  
  • ENG 090 - Fundamentals of College Writing, Experimental


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: English test placement into ENG 089  

     
    Description
    English 090 develops written communication skills, beginning with the ability to detect, diagnose, and correct error patterns in focused writings.  Students will practice sentence mechanics in the context of their own writing, while learning to develop paragraphs and short essays that clarify and support a point of view in preparation for college-level writing. Students will then progress to planning, drafting, revising and editing of short essays, some of which will be reading-based.  Supplemental instruction is a required part of this course.

    Students must earn an “A” grade to register for ENG101. Students who earn “B” or “C” grades will be reviewed for progression to either ENG101 or ENG101 + 1 (lab). Students who earn a “D” grade will be reviewed for progession to ENG101 +1 (lab), ENG089, or ENG100.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and correct error patterns in writing.
    2. Demonstrate in writing an awareness of audience, purpose and tone. 
    3. Apply critical reading and thinking skills to their writing.
    4. Revise and edit multiple written drafts.
    5. Use sources responsibly.
    6. Produce 5-7 multi-paragraph essays totaling 14-18 pages of writing for the semester.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sentence structure, grammar and punctuation
    2. Paragraph development including unity and coherence
    3. Constructing thesis statements
    4. Planning and organization of ideas
    5. Summary, paraphrase and direct quotation
    6. Academic integrity and intellectual honesty, including avoiding plagiarism
    7. Pre-writing strategies
    8. Drafting
    9. Revision and editing, including proofreading
    10. Basic formatting and composing on a computer
    Reference Materials
    Learning Commons, textbook, OER
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving


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  • ENG 095 - Basic Technical Writing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: English Placement Test

     
    Description
    This is a developmental course designed for students in union-affiliated apprenticeship programs as a pre-requisite to ENG 111 . Students will learn and review basics of grammar, punctuation and spelling through the writing of short, focused essays, some of which will have technical elements. This course is not intended to replace the ENG 089  and ENG 100  sequence in any other program.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling to all writing in numerous writing assignments.
    2. Write effective paragraphs with explicit topic sentences, with each paragraph confined to the support and development of a main idea.
    3. Discover and develop themes.
    4. Write clear, concise essays.
    5. Proofread and edit as tools essential to the writing process.
    6. Demonstrate the rudiments of critical reading, thinking, and writing skills.
    7. Write essays with an exit error level of 3% or less.
    Listed Topics
    1. The study and analysis of student and professional writing
    2. The process of writing with emphasis on revision
    3. Examination and criticism of student and professional technical essays and reports
    4. Peer and professional examination and evaluation of student writing
    5. Some reading based writing with occasional technical emphasis
    6. Five to seven multi-paragraphed essays, some with technical emphasis: 12-16 pages of writing for the semester
    Reference Materials
    Books and materials on writing, writing correctly, and writing in a technical environment.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 100 - Basic Principles Composition


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 089  (minimum Grade “C”) or successful placement.

     
    Description
    This is a writing course in planning, drafting, revising, and proofreading the short expository essay in preparation for college-level writing. Special attention is given to skills necessary for developing paragraphs that clarify and support a point of view. This course may serve as a general elective but not as an English or Humanities elective. Students must earn a “C” grade or better to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Write effective paragraphs and short expository essays that employ unity, coherence, completeness and order.
    2. Apply editing skills (English grammar, diction, punctuation and spelling).
    3. Apply basic skills in critical reading and thinking.
    4. Shape writing by an awareness of audience, purpose and tone.
    5. Use and credit sources responsibly and appropriately.
    6. Produce 5-7 multi-paragraph essays, some of which include reading-based writing, 14-18 pages of writing for the semester.
    Listed Topics
    Review as Needed:
        1.  Sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation
    Review and Further Develop:
        2.  Paragraph Development including topic sentences and the use of supporting details
        3.  Paragraph unity and coherence
        4.  Thesis sentence development, evaluation, and placement
        5.  Academic integrity including plagiarism and fabrication
        6.  The Writing Process and the recursive nature of writing:
        7.  Exploring—invention strategies generating and analyzing ideas
        8.  Planning—organizing ideas
        9.  Drafting
       10. Revising
       11. Editing using rules of standard written English
       12. Proofreading
       13. Format on the computer
       14. Quotation, summary, and paraphrase
       15. Proper use of citation conventions
    Introduce:
       16. Writing with an awareness of audience, purpose, and some elements of tone
       17. Use of primary and secondary sources
       18. Evaluating basic library holdings and internet sources
       19. The differences between academic, professional, and informal writing


     Reference Materials
    May be unique to each class.


    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 03/04/2008


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  • ENG 101 - English Composition 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful placement, ENG 100  and DVS 101  or DVS 103  (Minimum grade “C”); -OR- EAL 100  and EAL 101  (Minimum grade “C”)

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to college-level, academic writing. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis, argumentation, intellectual honesty and revision. Through the writing process, students will refine arguments; develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and integrate appropriate sources; revise and edit for effective style and usages; and develop an awareness of the variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes of academic writing. Students produce five to seven reading-based, multi-paragraphed argumentative essays of increasing difficulty, totaling 15-20 pages for the semester.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    1. Create strong thesis statements that are arguable, specific and grounded in critical thinking and analysis.
    2. Present written arguments that follow a cohesive and coherent organizing structure.
    3. Synthesize and integrate text-based evidence in order to support claims.
    4. Examine the influence of cultural context, assumptions and underlying bias of sources.
    5. Revise drafts for clarity, logical consistency and cohesion.
    6. Apply appropriate formatting and citation standards to written work.

     Listed Topics

    1. Organization: body paragraphs, transitions, introductions and conclusions
    2. Summary, paraphrase, direct quotation and citation
    3. Avoiding plagiarism
    4. Writing sound theses
    5. Audience, purpose and tone
    6. Clarity and syntax
    7. Reading and writing for critical analysis
    8. Using argumentative and persuasive strategies
    9. Synthesis of diverse sources
    10. Distinguishing between observations, inferences, and value judgements
    11. Identifying and minimizing bias
    12. Recognizing and avoiding errors in logic
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, internet resources and multi-media.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • ENG 101L - English Composition I with Tutorial Writing Lab, Experimental


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Placement or successful completion of ENG 090  with a B or C grade, AND placement or successful completion of DVS 060  and DVS 070 ; or placement into ENG-100 or successful completion of ENG-089; or department waiver.

     
    Description
    English 101L introduces students to college-level, academic writing. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis, argumentation, intellectual honesty, and revision. Through the writing process, students will refine arguments; develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and integrate appropriate sources; revise and edit for effective style and usages; and develop an awareness of the variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes of academic writing. This course includes both the 3-credit ENG101 lecture as well as a 1-credit tutorial writing lab for students who would traditionally require developmental writing coursework before attempting college-level composition. ENG101L Tutors are embedded within the ENG101 lectures, in addition to being responsible for running the tutorial writing labs. These tutorial writing labs provide guidance and support for students in completing their ENG101 coursework. The tutorial writing labs will incorporate discussions and reviews of ENG101 readings and notes, writing workshops for ENG101 essay assignments, and review of basic academic writing skills as needed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to

    1. Create strong thesis statements that are arguable, specific, and grounded in critical thought and analysis.
    2. Present written arguments that follow a cohesive and coherent organizing structure.
    3. Synthesize and integrate text-based evidence in order to support claims.
    4. Consider the influence of cultural context, assumptions, and underlying bias of sources.
    5. Evaluate and revise drafts for clarity, logical consistency, and cohesion.
    6. Apply appropriate formatting and citation standards to written work.
    Listed Topics
    1. Organization: body paragraphs, transitions, introductions, and conclusions
    2. Summary, paraphrase and direct quotation
    3. Avoiding plagiarism
    4. Writing sound theses
    5. Audience, purpose, and tone
    6. Clarity and syntax
    7. Reading and writing for critical analysis
    8. Using argumentative and persuasive strategies
    9. Synthesis of diverse sources
    10. Distinguishing between observations, inferences, and value judgements
    11. Identifying and minimizing bias
    12. Recognizing and avoiding errors in logic
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, internet resources and multi-media

    The student will produce five to seven reading-based, multi-paragraphed argumentative essays of increasing difficulty, totaling 15-20 pages for the semester.


    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 102 - English Composition 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This course develops information literacy skills, with a focus on research-based writing. Building on English 101, this course emphasizes critical and ethical analysis of popular and scholarly writing, in addition to inquiry-based research. Students develop other crucial research skills, particularly: using technology to conduct primary and secondary research, systematic evaluation, synthesis and documentation of sources, and critical thinking about the social, intellectual, and cultural frameworks through which evidence and conclusions are presented. Students produce multiple research-based writing assignments totaling 15 to 20 pages.


     


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop a viable signature research essay.
    2. Evaluate sources for accuracy, bias and relevance.
    3. Synthesize multiple and diverse non-fiction sources.
    4. Attribute and cite sources correctly according to current MLA/APA guidelines.
    5. Revise and edit multiple drafts of written work.
    Listed Topics
    1. Organization, including introductions and conclusions
    2. Peer evaluation
    3. Summary, paraphrase and direct quotation
    4. Plagiarism
    5. Using argumentative and persuasive strategies
    6. Writing sound theses
    7. Audience, purpose and tone
    8. Clarity and syntax
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • ENG 103 - Technical Communications


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  or ENG 111  

     
    Description
    This course teaches students how to prepare clear and concise technical reports and documentation utilizing diagrams, charts, infographics and data for different audiences. This course also introduces students to the role of usability testing, design and technology in the rapidly changing field of technical communication.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Distinguish between technical and non-technical writing.
    2. Write clear, concise material for specific audiences.
    3. Use charts, graphs, infographics and other design elements in technical documentation.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of good usability.
    5. Produce a medium-sized technical report from conception to completion.

     Listed Topics

    1. Technical proposals and reports
    2. Usability
    3. Documentation design
    4. Accessibility in technical communication and design
    5. Professional communications
    Reference Materials
    Up-to-date Open Education Resources and/or textbooks as appropriate.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr, Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ENG 104 - The Basics of APA Style, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course that introduces students to the basics of the American Psychological Association Style. The course will help students of the behavioral sciences and other related fields apply rules of APA style in writing research reports and other relevant documents. The course will follow the organization of the sixth edition of the APA Publication Manual, providing a comprehensive overview of manuscript elements.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify types of articles associated with social science research and related fields.
    2. Identify APA manuscript structure and content.
    3. Identify mechanics of style requirements, including punctuation, capitalization, italics and the use of numbers.
    4. Identify APA guidelines for displaying results, including guidance on creating tables and figures.
    5. Identify and develop APA style in crediting sources in text and in creating a reference list.
    6. Apply appropriate APA style to a research report.
       

     Listed Topics

    1. Manuscript structure and content
    2. APA style headings
    3. APA language
    4. Mechanics of style, including punctuation, capitalization, italics and the use of numbers.
    5. Tables and figures
    6. In-text citations
    7. References list
    8. Online and print sources
    9. Research report writing
    10. Digital Object Identifier
    Reference Materials
    Publication Manual of APA, 61 edition and Mastering APA Style: Student’s Workbook and Training Guide, 61
    edition


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  • ENG 105 - Creative Writing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This is a course designed for beginning creative writers. The course will explore the technical devices and elements of craft in at least two of the following genres: short fiction, poetry and drama. Students will apply the elements of craft to their own writing and their classmates writing through workshops.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply critical reading techniques to the analysis of published short stories, poems and drama.
    2. Apply the writing process to creative writing situations.
    3. Employ the technical devices and elements of craft to analyze their own and their classmates’ creative writing.
    4. Apply the conventions of short story, poetic, and drama to writing.
    5. Develop and apply criteria for literary writing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Development and revision strategies
    2. Literary analysis of short stories, poetry, and drama
    3. Literary writing expectations
    4. Elements of craft and style
    5. Technical devices
    6. Conventions of the short story, poem, and play
    7. Manuscript form
    8. Workshop response
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 111 - Technical English


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful placement; ENG 095  or ENG 100  and DVS 101  or DVS 103  (minimum grade “C”); or EAL 100  and EAL 101  (minimum grade “C”)

     
    Description
    This course focuses on writing essays and technical reports with an emphasis on sentence and paragraph structure, mechanics, and clarity. This course relates to the student’s field of study and substitutes for ENG 101  with English Department approval, and only in specified certificate and apprenticeship programs. Students write five to seven reports and essays totaling 15-20 pages for the semester.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Present written technical reports and essays that follow a cohesive and coherent organizing structure.
    2. Create strong thesis statements.
    3. Synthesize text-based materials in written technical communication.
    4. Revise and edit reports and essays.
    5. Apply standard grammar and punctuation in all writing assignments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Methods of organization with emphasis on focus and paragraph development
    2. Analysis and criticism of student and professional technical essays and reports
    3. Both out-of-class and in-class writing
    4. Introduction to APA documentation
    5. Use of quotations and paraphrase to avoid plagiarism
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 04/24/2020


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  • ENG 115 - General Literature


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This is a survey course which examines selected poetry, drama and fiction. Principles of literary criticism are introduced. This course is for students who want an overview of literary works.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List and define traditional literary forms and genres and their key characteristics.
    2. Recognize and explain both stated and implied meanings in literature selections.
    3. Recognize and explain the themes and motifs in literature selections.
    4. Use literary terminology appropriately.
    5. Draft, edit and revise an analytical essay upon a literary topic.
    6. Draw inferences from literature selections and motifs that help relate the literature to personal or social experience.
    7. Identify standard approaches to literary criticism, explain the essential differences among them and apply select approaches to literary works.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to the elements of fiction
    2. Introduction to the elements of poetry
    3. Introduction to the elements of dramatic literature
    4. Literary terminology
    5. Basic principles of literary criticism
    6. Application of critical thinking and analytical skills in written and oral exercises
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 117 - Children’s Literature


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This is a course that introduces and surveys children’s literature including poetry, picture books, fables, folktales, myths, realistic and fantastic fiction and nonfiction. A reading knowledge of representative, noteworthy children’s texts and their evaluative review will be emphasized. Critical issues in children’s literature will also be examined and debated.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify significant historic milestones and literary movements in the development of children’s literature.
    2. Develop criteria to use in evaluating all major genres of children’s literature.
    3. Recognize the classics of children’s literature, including major authors and illustrators from the 15th century to the present.
    4. Identify and argue from the principal issues of debate and more recent scholarship in children’s literature such as censorship, didacticism, feminism, multiculturalism, and post modernism.
    5. Develop practical strategies for engaging children with literature and encouraging a meaningful response.
    6. Apply critical reading to the texts.
    7. Develop critical thinking skills by analyzing the literature.
    8. Further develop writing skills in relationship to literature
    Listed Topics
    1. Children’s poetry: including nursery rhymes, and classic as well as contemporary works
    2. Picture and illustrated books: classic as well as contemporary
    3. Fables, folktales, fairytales, legends, romances, epics, and myths
    4. Fiction: both realism and fantasy
    5. Nonfiction: including but not limited to biography and autobiography; instruction, travel, and history
    6. Critical issues of debate and recent scholarship
    7. Timeline of periods and authors
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/30/2007


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  • ENG 118 - Women As Writers


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This is a course in the study of women writers’ works: essays, diaries and autobiographies, as well as novels, plays and poetry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify women writers and their literature.
    2. Explain the effect of cultural, historical and socio-economic forces on women writers.
    3. Trace and explain the intellectual heritage contributing to the present day women’s movement.
    4. Identify and explicate major themes developed by women writers.
    5. Analyze the contemporary critical responses to the literature written by women.
    6. Develop critical reading, thinking and writing skills by analyzing the literature.
    Listed Topics
    1. Literary forms used by women: plays, poetry, short stories, novels and non-fiction
    2. Changing cultural, social, historical and economic definitions of women’s roles and rights and the influence on the themes and styles of women writers
    3. Critical responses to women’s literature
    4. Characteristics of a feminist approach to literature
    5. Timeline of periods and authors
    6. Stylistic variations of the writing of women
    7. Literary analysis of writers’ works
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 120 - The Art of Film


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

     
    Description
    This is a course that introduces film as a source of visual literacy, intellectual and artistic enlightenment. It offers a historical perspective while analyzing film as an art form. Films are selected for study of cinematic innovation, genre and directional artistry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate the visual, thematic and technical elements of the genre.
    2. Develop a cinematic vocabulary which allows them to become both critical and sensitive viewers.
    3. Recognize film as a primary vehicle for fiction.
    4. Identify and use criteria to judge performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Film genres, including but not limited to:
    • Film Noir
    • Silent Film
    • Foreign Film
    • Musicals
    • Epic
    • Docudrama
    • Drama
    • Westerns

        2. History of the origin of film
        3. The conventions of film, including:

    • Directing
    • Musical Score
    • Editing
    • Acting
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 200 - Dramatic Literature


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a course in the study of plays and critical commentary. Students study tragedy and comedy and the experiments in modern drama which have transformed them.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and describe representative dramas and their respective authors from the major periods: Classical, Renaissance, Neoclassical, Modern and Contemporary.
    2. Survey and summarize the historical development of drama.
    3. Identify and make use of the cultural, political, historical and sociological influences on individual dramas.
    4. Define and make use of theatrical terminology.
    5. Assess and criticize at least one theatrical performance.
    6. Discern reasons, such as enjoyment, for reading dramatic literature.
    7. Make use of critical reading, thinking and writing skills applied to drama.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theatrical and dramatic terminology
    2. Representative dramas and their respective authors from the major periods: Classical, Renaissance, Neoclassical, Modern and Contemporary
    3. Cultural, historical, political and social background.
    4. Performance versus literary reading
    5. Relevant criticism
    6. Writing experiences which will encourage critical thinking
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 201 - Poetry


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a course in the study of poems of various periods and types. Emphasis is on the meaning of individual poems and the interplay of sensory images. The course will examine how social and philosophical culture dictate how poetry is written and establish what qualities make great poetry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the shifting influences on poetry.
    2. Analyze poetic structure, theme, figures of speech employed and nuances.
    3. Accurately place poets within each historic period.
    4. Explain each poet’s relationship to the development of poetry in his/her historic period.
    5. Explain the specific characteristics of poems from various literary periods.
    6. Define poetry terminology.
    7. Apply techniques of poetry analysis to texts.
    8. Write effective poetry analyses; write comparative analytical papers.
    9. Memorize at least 20 lines of poetry to understand sound, rhythm, rhyme.
    10. Craft some poetry in order to understand the process of writing.
    11. Participate in discussion to hone skills of analysis and understanding of poetry.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principal historic movements and influences: Timeline of periods and authors
    2. Major poets and works: Language structure and characteristics of each author’s writings
    3. Varieties of themes and styles – literary analysis of select works; closed form versus open form poetry; scansion; rhyme and meter; figures of speech
    4. The effects of language on the genre/structure of literature
    5. Literary analysis of major works
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 202 - Fiction


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a course in the comparative study of the short story and novel. Emphasis is on the American and European literary forms.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the rise of the novel and short story (historical antecedents will be studied as appropriate).
    2. Define the conventions of fiction writing in different countries and periods.
    3. Apply a wide variety of convention to their interpretations of texts.
    4. Analyze literature from a variety of critical perspectives, including formalist, genre, historical, linguistic, philosophical, sociological, and psychological.
    5. Deepen critical thinking skills by writing analyses and/or giving oral presentations on specific literary texts.
    6. Synthesize information in a comprehensive essay examination at the conclusion of the course.
    7. Assess and critique theories of the novel and short story, including the nature and value of canonical texts.
    Listed Topics
    1. The rise and evolution of the novel and short story
    2. Conventional techniques such as points of view choices and effects
    3. Motifs and themes commonly encountered in fiction
    4. Application of literary theories in the analysis of fiction
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 204 - English Literature From 18th Century to the Present


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a survey course of English literature from the Romantic period to modern times. Included are such major writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, Tennyson, Yeats, Eliot and Joyce.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify historical periods and explain major cultural aspects and political/governmental structures of those periods and how they influenced the literature and authors that are studied.
    2. Trace the progression of literature from the Romantic period to the present, analyzing the different periods for both differences and similarities.
    3. Develop critical thinking skills by analyzing the literature.
    4. Further develop writing skills in relationship to literature.
    5. Identify themes and their development in historical/cultural periods.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principal historic movements, culture, and political tendencies which influence a writer’s ideas and style
    2. Major authors and works
    3. Literary analysis of major works
    4. Timeline of periods and authors
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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  • ENG 205 - American Literature to the Civil War


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a survey course of American literature from the Colonial Period to the Civil War. Included are such major writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman and Melville. Also studied are historical, political and philosophical trends important to an understanding of the literature.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and define various genres of early American Literature.
    2. Identify the major historical time periods and literary trends from the Pre-Columbian era to the end of the Civil War and list characteristics of each time period/trend.
    3. Develop and exercise effective critical reading, thinking, and writing skills.
    4. Evaluate the development of the American literary canon in order to judge the validity of literary theories and critical perspectives.
    5. Investigate through research methods the major concepts of American literary history, including oral traditions, Spanish and English colonization, Puritanism, the Enlightenment, and Romanticism.
    6. Synthesize information from class readings, discussions, learning activities, lectures, and research and illustrate this synthesis in evaluated writing assignments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Major Literary periods from the Pre-Columbian era to the end of the Civil War
    2. Principal historical movements, social conditions, and political tendencies that influence a writer’s ideas and style
    3. Characteristics of major critical perspectives
    4. Characteristics of American literature
    5. Common themes of the literature
    6. Application of critical thinking skills in written and oral exercises
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 206 - American Literature From the Civil War to the Present


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a survey course of American literature from the Civil War to the modern period. Included are such major writers as Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner and Steinbeck. Also studied are historical, political and philosophical trends important to an understanding of the literature.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List and define the major literary periods in America from the Civil War to the present.
    2. Identify the major historical time periods and literary trends from the end of the Civil War to the present and list characteristics of each time period/trend.
    3. Develop and exercise effective critical reading, thinking and writing skills.
    4. Evaluate the development of the American literary canon in order to judge the validity of literary theories and critical perspectives.
    5. Investigate through research methods the major concepts of American literary history, including realism, modernism, and post-modernism.
    6. Synthesize information from class readings, discussions, learning activities, lectures and research and illustrate this synthesis in evaluated writing assignments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Major literary periods from 1865 to the present, especially literary realism and modernism
    2. Principal historical movements, social conditions, and political tendencies that influence a writer’s ideas and style
    3. Characteristics of major critical perspectives
    4. Characteristics of American literature
    5. Common themes of the literature
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 207 - African-American Literature


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a survey of literature by African-Americans from the days of slavery, through Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, Modernism, from the beginnings of African American writings to twenty-first century authors. The objective of this course is to view African American literature critically, theoretically, historically and politically.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and place African-American writers in proper historical sequence in the cultural backdrop of America.
    2. Objectively analyze the writings, specifically, the folk tales, poetry, essays, plays, fiction and autobiography of African-Americans.
    3. Evaluate the literature by critically examining the issues that generated and encouraged African-American expression.
    4. Identify patterns in the human condition, both black and white, as well as patterns in the literature that argue for a relationship between past and present.
    5. Critique how African-Americans have recorded the history of America and its people through literature.
    Listed Topics
    1. Geographic influences on authors
    2. Principal historic movements, culture, and political tendencies which influence a writer’s ideas and style
    3. Language structure and characteristics of each author’s writings
    4. Literary analysis of major works
    5. Timeline of periods and authors
    6. Recurring themes in African-American literature
    7. Representations of African-American Identity in African-American literature
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 209 - World Literature to 1650


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a course that surveys the literature of the Western and non-western world from ancient times through 1650. Also studied are historical, political and philosophical trends important to the understanding of the literature.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify historical periods in different geographical areas and explain major cultural aspects and political/governmental structures of those periods.
    2. Accurately place significant authors within each historical period and explain each author’s relationship to the key concepts of that period.
    3. Explain the unique characteristics of the writings in each historical, cultural, geographic section.
    4. Develop critical thinking skills by analyzing the literature.
    5. Further develop writing skills in relationship to literature.
    6. Identify themes and their development in historical/cultural periods.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principal historic periods in different geographic areas and their influence on writers
    2. Principal cultural aspects of each historical era and how the authors reflect that culture
    3. Principal political/governmental influences on each author
    4. Major authors and works
    5. Obstacles of studying works in translation
    6. Literary analysis of major works
    7. Timeline of periods and authors
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 210 - World Literature From 1650 to the Present


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a course that surveys the literature of the Western and non-western world from 1650 to the present. Also studied are historical, political and philosophical trends important to the understanding of the literature.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify historical periods in different geographical areas and explain major cultural aspects and political/governmental structures of those periods.
    2. Accurately place significant authors within each historical period and explain each author’s relationship to the key concepts of that period.
    3. Explain the unique characteristics of the writings in each historical, cultural, geographic section.
    4. Develop critical thinking skills by analyzing the literature.
    5. Further develop writing skills in relationship to literature.
    6. Identify themes and their development in historical/cultural periods.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principal historic periods in different geographic areas and their influence on writers
    2. Principal cultural aspects of each historical era and how the authors reflect that culture
    3. Principal political/governmental influences on each author
    4. Major authors and works
    5. Obstacles of studying works in translation
    6. Literary analysis of major works
    7. Timeline of periods and authors
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 222 - Shakespeare’s Plays


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This course introduces the plays of William Shakespeare. A minimum of six plays selected from the comedies, tragedies and histories are read both as works of literature and as scripts for performance. Included in the course are performances of each play and background information on Shakespearean ideas, images and stage conventions.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the major dramatic genres of Shakespeare’s dramas and the general characteristics of each.
    2. Review the historical and cultural background of Elizabethan theater.
    3. Recall basic elements of plot, character and setting in specific plays.
    4. Describe major themes of specific plays studied and identify the roles of major characters in developing those themes and plots.
    5. Analyze the dramas studied within the cultural context of Shakespeare’s time and their relevance to the present.
    6. Synthesize an argument or analyze specific elements of a play and present that argument in a college-level essay.
    Listed Topics
    1. Shakespeare’s plays
    2. Production and staging in the Elizabethan theater
    3. The Elizabethan world view, and historical and cultural background
    4. Twentieth-century film and stage versions of Shakespeare’s plays
    5. Themes, structures, and conventions of the drama genre
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENG 223 - Science Fiction


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  

     
    Description
    This is a course that studies short stories and novels about science, technology or the future. The origins, development and the methods of evaluation are examined.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define and characterize science fiction.
    2. Compare and contrast specific works and trends within the genre.
    3. Explain the political and social backgrounds that produce science fiction.
    4. Use critical reading, thinking and writing skills to understand elements of specific fictions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Short stories and novels about science, technology, or the future
    2. The origins of science fiction and its development
    3. Methods of critically evaluating science fiction as a genre
    4. Writing experiences which encourage critical thinking
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search



Environmental Technician

  
  • ENV 103 - Fundamentals of Air Science and Pollution


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 133   with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of air and air pollution. Students explore the fundamentals of the atmosphere; including atmosphere strata, oxygen cycle and the composition of air. Threats to air quality, both local and global, are discussed along with methods of pollution prevention. The history of air quality management in the US is contrasted to air quality management in other countries to provide the student with a global understanding of air flow, weather patterns and the impacts of pollution from one country to another. Emphasis is placed on the Clean Air Act, other local or state laws, the impacts of air pollution on human health and the environment, climate change and greenhouse gases, fundamentals of emissions and control of sources, and indoor air quality.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify atmospheric layers and their contents.
    2. Analyze air quality management in the US compared to other countries.
    3. Explain the interaction of air with Earth’s other natural cycles (carbon, water, etc.).
    4. Describe the physical, chemical and biological properties of air.
    5. Define the types and causes of air pollution.
    6. Identify the laws pertinent to air quality and pollution reduction/prevention.
    7. Summarize climate change and its effect on air quality.
    Listed Topics
    1. Interaction of the oxygen, carbon and water cycles
    2. Atmosphere strata
    3. Types of pollution
    4. Weather patterns
    5. Climate change
    6. Greenhouse gases
    7. Clean Air Act and other laws
    8. Global air quality management
    9. Sources of emissions and their controls
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or OER
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 105 - Fundamentals of Soil Science and Pollution


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 133  with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of soil and soil pollution. Students explore the composition and genesis of different soils in various ecosystems, soil functions, soil strata, nutrient cycling, biology as it pertains to soil fertility and erosion as it pertains to land use. Soil pollution, the Pollution Prevention Act, local and/or state laws pertaining to land pollution, source reduction of pollution and methods of control are discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the various types of soils as they pertain to ecosystems and land use.
    2. Define the types of soil structure and their characteristics.
    3. Explain the role of nutrients and their availability in soil.
    4. Describe physical, chemical and biological properties of soil.
    5. Summarize types of soil pollution and causes of erosion.
    6. Identify the laws pertinent to soil quality and pollution reduction/prevention.
    Listed Topics
    1. Soil composition
    2. Soil classification
    3. Soil genesis
    4. Nutrient availability
    5. Soil cycle
    6. Soil pollution
    7. Erosion basics and causes
    8. Biological activities in soil
    9. Physical properties of soil
    10. Wetlands (hydric) soil specifics
    11. Management of soil quality
    12. Pollution Prevention Act
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or OER
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 107 - Fundamentals of Water Science and Pollution


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 133  with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of water, water pollution and control. Students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental aspects of water, such as the water cycle, properties of water, water chemistry, and the role water plays on Earth. Sources of water pollution and its effects on water ecosystems are discussed along with ways to prevent, reduce or control pollution in both surface and ground water. An introduction to the Clean Water Act and the historical events that led up to it provide students with an understanding of water issues around the world. The impact of climate change on water ecosystems is also introduced.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the basic characteristics of water.
    2. Identify differences among water ecosystems (lakes, oceans, ground, etc).
    3. Describe the physical, chemical and biological properties of water.
    4. Define the types and causes of water pollution and the impact on water ecosystems.
    5. Identify the laws and local/state regulations pertinent to water quality and pollution reduction/prevention.
    6. Summarize climate change and its effect on water quality and accessibility.
    7. Analyze water conservation efforts around the globe.
    Listed Topics
    1. Water chemistry
    2. Biological components of water
    3. Water ecosystems
    4. Sources and types of pollution
    5. Climate change
    6. Clean Water Act and other pertinent regulations
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or OER
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 109 - Environmental Health and Safety


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 133  with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This course prepares students to handle hazardous materials in the workplace, identify safety concerns that could cause accidents and propose solutions. The lecture emphasizes safety hazards that could be found in a broad spectrum of industries and will explore appropriate solutions to address those concerns. Students learn the common hazardous materials most often found in workplaces, how they should be properly disposed of and the regulations that govern disposal. The lab consists of an online module that includes a 40-hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) course from OSHA Educational Center and carries an additional fee. HAZWOPER supports the lecture by providing more detail on what makes materials hazardous to human health and the environment, the proper procedures for the handling and disposal of hazardous waste, procedures for emergency situations and appropriate safety methods and controls. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), levels of contamination and decontamination procedures are discussed. This course includes an additional $250.00 fee to be paid directly to the vendor for the online HAZWOPER training.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain procedures to identify, handle and dispose of hazardous materials.
    2. Identify safety issues in the workplace.
    3. Propose solutions to safety concerns.
    4. Explore examples of on-site emergencies and their outcomes.
    5. Describe common hazardous materials.
    6. Explain the impact of hazardous wastes on human health and the environment.
    7. Define appropriate safety methods in the workplace.
    8. Explain the meaning of different hazard symbols.
    9. Achieve 40-hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) certification.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of hazards
    2. Hazardous materials
    3. Hazard signs and symbols
    4. Disposal techniques
    5. Safety in the workplace
    6. On-site emergencies
    7. PPE
    8. Impacts on human health and the environment
    9. OSHA regulations and other agencies and regulations
    10. Toxicology of hazardous materials
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or OER; OSHA 40-Hour HAZWOPER online training course.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 203 - Introduction to Sampling Methods and Analysis


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ENV 103 , ENV 105 , ENV 107  with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This hands-on course introduces students to the basic sampling methods for soil, water and air. Students learn how to sample soil, sediments, surface water and air using accepted protocols developed by governmental regulatory authorities and the methods required to send samples to a lab for analysis. Students use basic sampling equipment including kits, filters, and sensor units unique to each type of sampling (such as YSI and/or loggers) and learn how to fix basic equipment while in the field. Emphasis is placed on proper sampling methods, Chain of Custody (COC) and holding times and good field techniques to ensure quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) over samples. Students also learn how to manage data using several available databases and interpret the data collected from both field and lab to identify trends. Students are required to provide their own transportation to sampling events.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate ability to collect field samples for surface water, soil, sediments and air using standard operating procedures.
    2. Explain proper handling and chain of custody procedures of field samples to ensure QA/QC.
    3. Prepare all required paperwork without error.
    4. Transfer samples to a lab for processing using proper transfer methods.
    5. Summarize the difference between the sampling methods for surface water, soil, sediment and air.
    6. Utilize problem solving skills to repair basic equipment while in the field. 
    7. Analyze data from collected samples.
    Listed Topics
    1. Equipment pertinent to each type of sampling
    2. Basic repair of equipment
    3. Sampling methods
    4. Standard protocols for sampling
    5. Paperwork required by government agencies
    6. Data management and analysis
    Reference Materials
    Lab manual
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 205 - Environmental Laws and Policy


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENV 103 , ENV 105 , ENV 107  with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This course focuses on the history, evolution and application of the most important federal environmental laws along with the government agencies that enforce the regulations that carry out the intent of the laws to protect human health and the environment. The specifics and application of the major environmental laws are discussed. Agencies to be explored include, but are not limited to, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and entities of local government. This is a writing intensive course and students are required to read and summarize articles and outside sources as provided by instructor. To focus on regional concerns, to the extent possible, guest speakers from various governmental and non-governmental organizations (NGO) join the class to discuss their agencies’ missions and programs.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Summarize the major environmental laws and their history.
    2. Explain the role of government agencies in protecting the environment.
    3. Describe the application of federal and state environmental regulations to regional and local concerns over air and water quality.
    4. Articulate how environmental regulations affect business practices and local government operations.
    5. Analyze environmental articles from various sources to prepare written summaries.
    Listed Topics
    1. History and application of the main federal environmental laws
    2. Federal, state, and local agencies involved in environmental protection
    3. Major regulations as they pertain to environmental protection
    4. Impact of environmental regulatory requirements on business and local government
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or OER
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 207 - Environmental Site Assessment


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ENV 105  with a grade of C or better.

     
    Description
    This course explores Phase I Environmental Site Assessments (ESA) and Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) that are used in various industries. Emphasis is placed on evaluating the environmental conditions of soil, surface water and groundwater for contamination. Also discussed are the impacts of mold, radon, asbestos and lead on various ecosystems such as wetlands. Students evaluate sites as determined by the instructor and prepare a Phase I ESA using standard practices and techniques.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the various reports used by field technicians.
    2. Differentiate contamination levels in soil, surface water and groundwater.
    3. Evaluate presence of contamination to determine usefulness of site.
    4. Explain impacts of various contaminants on soil, surface water and groundwater. 
    5. Prepare sample Phase I ESAs and EISs without error.
    Listed Topics
    1. Regulations for property development with regards to environmental issues
    2. Phase I Environmental Site Assessments
    3. Environmental Impact Statements
    4. Human health effects of various contaminants
    5. Impact on ecosystem services 
    6. Common contaminants
    Reference Materials
    Textbook or OER
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ENV 213P - Capstone Project


    Credits: 3
    120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of all program courses with a C or better.

     
    Description
    This course represents a culmination of all skills obtained by the student throughout the program. Students use critical thinking to individually identify a local environmental problem, research the issue, and present a solution. Students provide a final written report, along with a project portfolio, and give an oral presentation to demonstrate what they’ve learned over the course of the program. The oral presentation is given to a small panel of teachers or outside experts who will evaluate its quality. The instructor works closely with each student to help narrow the scope of the project, ensure the student stays within the scope of the project, and generally keeps the student on track. Students keep records of the steps and research taken, along with any field notes if applicable, which become part of the project portfolio. Students must receive a passing grade on the Capstone project in order to successfully complete the program.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to identify an environmental problem.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency of environmental topics and possible solutions.
    3. Explain an environmental issue and solution to a general audience.
    4. Research an environmental topic thoroughly and include multiple perspectives.
    5. Utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills to propose a solution to an environmental problem.
    6. Document the process of completing the capstone project.
    7. Demonstrate proficiency in data collection and analysis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Environmental problem recognition
    2. Budgeting
    3. Data analysis
    4. Data management
    5. Self-direction
    6. Portfolio building
    7. Communication

    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search



Ethnic & Diversity Studies

  
  • ETH 101 - Ethnic and Diversity Studies


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This introductory survey course embraces differences based on age, race, gender, sexual orientation, national origin or physical or mental ability. Ethnic and Diversity studies is the study of the social, emotional, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped the development of America’s diverse ethnic and minority groups over the last 500 years. This course should result in an understanding of the factors that create the attitudes and behaviors in the various cultural and minority groups.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the particular histories of different cultural and minority groups in the United States.
    2. Compare theoretical lessons learned from studying these various groups.
    3. Articulate general principles that shape ethnic and minority relations both currently and historically.
    4. Explore how ethnic identity is constructed and reconstructed over time.
    5. Develop empathy and a sense of social responsibility.
    6. Demonstrate ability to analyze information with regard to a specific cultural or minority perspective.
    Listed Topics
    1. Identifying the various ethnic and minority groups
    2. Histories and present day status of ethnic and minority groups
    3. Immigration and Migration
    4. The contributions of oral history
    5. Language and communication differences
    6. The influence of poverty and socioeconomic status
    7. Differences in family structure
    8. Religious and moral beliefs
    9. Age, gender, sexuality, physical or mental abilities
    10. Stereotyping and defining multicultural terms
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, student classroom presentations, videos, music, compact disks and guest lecturers.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/13/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 112 - Understanding Violence in America


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course explores the history of violence as relates to the United States of America. It will examine the violence used against Africans, Native Americans, Latinos, and the Chinese in the “settlement” of America. Periodical use of violence to achieve national goals will also be explored. Violence taught in games, movies and television will be examined, as will violence in nursery rhymes and children’s stories. Particular attention will be paid to violence against ethnic groups. Alternative strategies to violence will also be explored.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Students will be able to explain the use of violence in the settlement of the new world.
    2. Students will be able to contrast the treatment by European settlers of Native American and Latino populations in the early days of the new world.
    3. Students will be able to compare the level of violence in three (3) sports discussed in class and be able to explain the level of societally-accepted violence in each sport.
    4. Students will be able to explain why military violence is acceptable in our society and how we prepare our youth to accept such violence.
    5. Students will be able to discuss whether the violence depicted in the media, has any impact on the level of acceptable violence in American society.
    6. Students will be able to choose three (3) children’s stories, poems or nursery rhymes and identify and contrast the level of violence in each.
    7. Students will be able to discuss three (3) techniques/activities that might help us raise children to be non-violent.
    Listed Topics
    1. Violence in the “settlement” of the New World
    2. The settlement of the West and the conquest of Native Americans and Mexicans
    3. Sports and Violence. Are most sports based on violence
    4. Military Violence as an acceptable means of solving disputes
    5. Violence in the media. Does the media encourage violence If so, how
    6. Violence and children’s stories and nursery rhymes
    7. Violence prevention: raising children to be non-violent
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, guest speakers, periodicals and videotapes.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/23/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 113 - Introduction to Black Women and Leadership


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This introductory course is designed to expose, connect and equip students with an overview of Black Women in leadership positions from African descent to modern America. It will provide a basic overview of leadership definitions, theories and concepts. Students will examine powerful Black Women who have demonstrated effective leadership in America, who made contributions that have furthered the process of social change in the African-American culture in the American society.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the historical development of Black Women in leadership roles from African descent to modern America.
    2. Name various Black Women who demonstrated leadership and made life-changing contributions from African descent and modern America.
    3. Discuss the concept of leadership when applying it personally and professionally.
    4. Develop leadership skills.
    5. Communicate clearly and effectively as a leader.
    6. Identify the basic difference between leadership and management.
    7. Conduct mini research projects on leadership topics.
    Listed Topics
    1. What is leadership?
    2. The difference between leadership and management
    3. Concepts in Black Leadership
    4. The contributions made by Black Women from African civilization before the New World
    5. A brief historical overview of slavery in the New World
    6. Africans in America: Enslaved Black Women from slavery to freedom in the New World
    7. Behind the Scenes: The involvement of Black Women leaders during the Civil Rights Movement
    8. On the Front Line: The representation and responsibility of Black Women’s role in the families, communities, churches, politics, films, music/entertainment, etc.
    9. Black Power: Investigate Black Women’s Leadership in education
    10. On the Rise: Identify Black Women in the 21st century demonstrating leadership roles that help shape and impact the African-American culture and society
    11. The future of Black Women and Leadership in America
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, DVD documentaries/videos, classroom activities/demonstrations and student classroom reports.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/13/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 114 - Achieving Cultural Competence


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will equip students with the tools to understand people of cultures other than their own. Students will be exposed to the aspects of culture that lead to our value systems. They will study how value systems determine behavior and can lead to unfair treatment of others. Students will learn what aspects of our lives are culturally determined. Major aspects of culture will be explored as well as how culture is transmitted, by whom, to whom, sanctions, and other issues will be explored.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Students will be able to explain the concept of culture.
    2. Students will be able to explain the difference between folkways and mores.
    3. Students will be able to explain the cultural underpinning of value/belief systems.
    4. Students will be able to discuss the melting pot theory and analyze the inherent flaws of this theory.
    5. Students will be able to discuss three (3) components of our belief system that are culturally determined.
    6. Students will be able to explain the concept of non-verbal communication. They will be able to discuss two (2) areas of conflict that may result from misinterpreted non-verbal communication.
    7. Students will be able to discuss and compare the differences between bias, prejudice, racism and discrimination.
    8. Students will be able to explain gender bias and its impact on equality for women.
    9. Students will choose two (2) cultural groups and compare their treatment of the elderly.
    10. Students will explain the concept of unearned privilege and will choose two (2) aspects of the phenomenon and compare/contrast the treatment of white and non-white individuals.
    Listed Topics
    1. What is culture
    2. How to identify sub-culture, how does it differ from a culture
    3. The cultural basis of value systems. Value systems grow out of cultural norms
    4. The inherent problems associated with the Melting Pot Theory
    5. An understanding of folkways and mores and societal sanctions associated with violations
    6. Identification of everyday life that is societally determined
    7. Non-verbal communication and culture. Avoiding major faux pas
    8. What is racism? How it differs from bias and discrimination
    9. Sexism in America. Is it rooted in all cultures
    10. Age discrimination and cultural norms. Do other societies treat the elderly as we do
    11. The concept of unearned privilege. Each day we are granted or denied privilege based on cultural norms. What is the historical basis of this
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, videos, classroom demonstrations and student classroom reports.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/23/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 119 - Diversity Training/Education in America


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course examines the phenomenon of diversity training/education in the United States. Students will explore the perceived necessity for such training, how the training often conflicts with strongly-held, personal belief systems and the advantages and disadvantages of such training. Training exercises and techniques will be explored. Students will be required, in small groups, to create and conduct their own training sessions.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Students will be able to define “diversity” as discussed in class.
    2. Students will be able to explain why diversity in our society is important.
    3. Students will be able to evaluate the changing population demographics in the United States and how this impacts on diversity training/education.
    4. Students will be able to explain the concept of the “melting pot theory” and be able to articulate the inherent problems of the theory.
    5. Student will be able to explain why U.S. companies need to be concerned about diversity.
    6. Students will be able to explain how diversity, or the lack of diversity impacts on the company’s “bottom line.”
    7. Students will be able to examine and explain the issue of diversity in education and discuss whether diversity is important in this arena.
    8. Students will be able to explain why governmental agencies must be concerned about diversity.
    9. Students will be able to explain the diversity issues related to: gender, race, culture and religion.
    10. Students will be able to design and conduct a diversity audit.
    11. Students will be able to contrast two (2) diversity training exercises.
    Listed Topics
    1. What is this thing called “diversity training
    2. Why bother with diversity training/education
    3. Shifting population demographics in the United States
    4. The inherent problems that grow out of the American “melting pot” theory
    5. Why should we be concerned about diversity? Who needs this anyhow
    6. The company’s “bottom line” (profits) and diversity
    7. Problems of diversity in education
    8. Governmental agencies and diversity
    9. Diversity issues related to:
    •  Gender
    •  Race
    •  Culture
    •  Religion
    •  Others

      10. Conducting a diversity audit
      11. Diversity training models

     Reference Materials
    Lectures, guest speakers, in-class exercises and role-playing.
     


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/23/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 121 - Current Issues in Ethnic and Diversity Studies


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will explore and provide an overview concerning current issues that ethnic groups face everyday in a rapidly changing diverse society. Differences based on age, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or physical or mental ability will be examined. Students will learn to understand ethnicity and diversity in the context of current issues in modern America.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain current social issues of various ethnic groups in America.
    2. Discuss how various ethnic groups in the United States have been affected by oppression and hardship.
    3. Describe ethnic group’s historical background and contributions which brought about social changes in America.
    4. Articulate and understand the conditions which have, historically, worsened racial tensions in the United States.
    5. Explain issues of diversity and differences.
    6. Develop skills in oral and written communication.
    7. Generate mini research projects from an ethnic studies perspective.
    Listed Topics
    1. Define Ethnic and Diversity
    2. The importance of identity/diversity awareness among ethnic groups living in America
    3. The role of ethnic and diversity and its importance to the media/press
    4. The flood gates of immigration regarding ethnic groups here in America
    5. Ethnic groups social perspectives dealing with differences and contributions to diversity in America
    6. How has the historical culture of ethnic groups impacted America’s current issues in the 21st century
    7. The state of diversity among ethnic groups in America: their own ethnicity, attitudes, behaviors and self-awareness
    8. What progress was made during the last several decades in encouraging diversity in the communities, churches, media, Internet, workplace, education, etc
    9. How can ethnic groups communicate across cultures in America in order to effectively grow and develop as a healthier society
    10. The effects of ethnic and diversity on school, educators’ practices and students’ achievement (compare and contrast the rewards and challenges)
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, classroom activities and student projects.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/13/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 122 - Race and Ethnic Relations in the Global Economy


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed for students to study race and ethnic relationships from a local, national, and global perspective. Emphasis is to provide students with a brief historical overview of how ethnic groups have played a major role in shaping modern America and the world. Students will be able to explore races and ethnic relations in the United States, Mexico, Spain, South and Central America, Caribbean, Middle East, Russia, Asia, and Africa Maintenance of ethnic identity, the development of ethnic stereotypes and prejudice, and the quality of ethnic relations will be examined.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze briefly the political, social and cultural factors that shape the core ethnic groups’ formation and transformation globally.
    2. Explain comparatively and cross-culturally the relationship among ethnic groups in the United States and throughout the world.
    3. Describe historical facts about ethnic groups and their relationships to power and inequality and their intersections with gender, sexuality, race and culture.
    4. Differentiate between historical and contemporary perspectives about the world among ethnic groups related hardships.
    5. Explain the relationship among historical events, culture and social forces depending on race, ethnicity and social class.
    6. Generate mini research projects from an ethnic studies perspective globally.
    Listed Topics
    1. Race, Ethnicity and Immigration
    2. The importance of embracing race and ethnic relations in a global context
    3. Racial formations in the United States
    4. Understand the Cultural Diversification Process
    5. Immigration and the reconstruction of the American Culture and American Identity
    6. Investigate the power, historical background, and perspectives of ethnic groups in the American and global economy (the historical and contemporary patterns of race and ethnic relations)
    7. Global diversity and leadership
    8. Inequality of human races
    9. Examine class identities and struggles, political conflicts, gender, racial and ethnic relations, cultural movements and transformations
    10. Various racial and ethnic groups’ interaction with each other and the possibilities for change globally
    11. How would ethnic relations be different if there were no ethnic segregation
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, classroom activities and student projects
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/13/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 124 - Hip Hop in America, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    Hip Hop, the music and lifestyle, is rooted in African American culture with its origins dating back to the urban life of the 1970’s on the streets and in the playgrounds of New York City. This course will critically explore the evolution of Hip Hop as a socio-cultural political and economic movement. Aspects of identity, aesthetics, race relations, gender politics and struggles for social justice will be examined as it relates to the impact of Hip Hop on American society. Urban  lifestyles and political activism in the Hip Hop generation will be discussed in an effort to identify Hip Hop as a means to redefine social responsibility and an urban political agenda in an effort to empower American youth. There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the origins of Hip Hop Music and Culture in America.
    2. Analyze the cultural, political and artistic value of Hip Hop
    3. Describe various elements that comprise the Hip Industry i.e. entertainment, fashion and music.
    4. Examine how hip-hop exemplifies cross cultural hybridization within the United States as well as internationally.
    5. Define the terminology associated with Hip Hop and its impact on American society.
    6. Use critical thinking and writing skills to communicate about Hip Hop in a scholarly voice.

     Listed Topics

    1. History of Music: Jazz, Doo Wop, BeBop, Funk , Soul, Hip Hop
    2. Pittsburgh’s Hill District and Music
    3. Pittsburgh’s Hip Hop Scene
    4. 1970’s
    5. Afrika Bambaataa and the Universal Zulu Nation
    6. Break Dancing and Turntablism
    7. Hip Hop and Geography: East Coast v. West Cost
    8. Gangsta Rap and the War on Drugs
    9. Hip Hop and fashion
    10. Hip Hop and Politics
    11. A Closer Look at Biggie Smalls and Tupac Shakur
    12. Hip Hop the Business: Contracts, Agreements and Money
    13. Hip Hop, Feminism and Equality
    Reference Materials
    The Big Payback by Dan Charnus (2010)
    Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor (2008)


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 205 - Latino Cultural Studies


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a survey course designed to acquaint students with a historical development of the Latino American culture, socio-economic experiences, cultural movements, and issues in the Unites States. The course will focus on the rapid construction and transformation of the Latino-American’s identity from the 1960’s onwards.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the historical and cultural issues/events of the Latino movements in the United States.
    2. Describe the differences and similarities of experiences between and among sub-groups in the Latino culture.
    3. Identify past and present social and economic problems facing the Latino groups.
    4. Explain Latino cultural contributions to the United States through film/video, literature, art and music.
    5. Describe the Latino immigration from 1960 and the effects in the United States.
    6. Conduct mini research from an ethnic studies perspective.
    Listed Topics
    1. Why study the Latino culture in the United States
    2. Define the various groups in the Latino culture
    3. Analyze the main demographic features of the various U.S. Latino communities and compare each group’s unique immigration history, settlement patterns and transnational activities
    4. Explore the core ethical issues and ethnical arguments in the rapid existence of the Latino groups in America
    5. Examine the Latino culture representations in film/video
    6. Examine the Latino culture representations in literature/poetry/art
    7. Examine the Latino culture representations in music
    8. Compare and contrast Latino housing with other minority groups’ housing
    9. The Latino groups’ family financial problems, unemployment, poor health and other life issues
    10. The future of the Latino American culture
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, classroom activities and student projects
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/13/2008


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 207 - Separate and Unequal: The Continuing Story of Discrimination in America, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will examine the historical development of discrimination in America from the beginning of the formation of the United States of America. It will look at unfair treatment of American citizens based on race, creed, color, national origin, age, sexual orientation, appearance, economics, speech patterns, disability, and other categories into which we divide human beings. The course will also examine ways to combat such ill treatment and how to move this country towards true equality.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the meanings of discrimination, bias and prejudice.
    2. Discuss how various forms of discrimination harm individuals.
    3. Compare forms of discrimination based on gender, sexual orientation and race.
    4. Articulate how discrimination harms the growth of the United States both as a world leader and an economic power.
    5. Discuss the reasons that discrimination may lead to clashes among people in the United States and result in violent behavior.
    Listed Topics
    1. What is discrimination?
    2. What is prejudice?
    3. The roots of gender discrimination
    4. Discrimination in the establishment of the United States of America
    5. Bias and prejudice of religion
    6. How negative discrimination impacts religion
    7. The law and discrimination
    8. Age Discrimination by culture
    9. The pseudo-science of race and how it encourages racial discrimination
    10. Physical appearance and discrimination
    11. Discrimination based on l.Q. and perceived mental ability
    12. Economic discrimination
    13. Medical discrimination
    14. Discrimination based on residential and geographic location
    15. Body decoration and discrimination
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary text and audio-visual materials will be used.


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 215 - African Art/Artifacts in the Cycle of Life


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course examines African art/artifacts from a cultural perspective. Students will learn that these items were not meant as decoration: they are part of the secular and religious life of Africans. Students will also learn how African art led to the creation of the abstract art produced by European masters.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Students will be able to show how African art influenced European art and name two (2) European “masters” who utilized African art in their works.
    2. Students will be able to tell how African art is used in African societies. They will be able to compare and contrast the differences between so-called secular and religious art.
    3. Students will be able to explain the differences between European and African art.
    4. Students will be able to identify and discuss the art of two (2) difference African ethnic groups.
    Listed Topics
    1. African traditional religion before Christianity
    2. African “art” in the cycle of life. How “art” is used in religious and secular events
    3. The difference between European and African “art”
    4. African artifacts by Kinship Group. How to identify the “art” of specific groups
    5. African “art” and its influence on the European “master” painters such as: Picasso, Modigliani and others
    Reference Materials
    Slides, lectures, textbooks and art pieces as available.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/23/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ETH 220 - History of the Pittsburgh Civil Rights Movement


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course examines the Civil Rights Movement in Pittsburgh. It starts with a brief overview of racial conditions in the United States, with special emphasis on Pittsburgh. The groups that participated in the movement will be discussed as will the individuals involved in seeking racial equality. Students will also learn about the government agencies and businesses confronted. During the movement, the specific techniques used by civil rights groups will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Students will be able to discuss racial conditions in Pittsburgh prior to 1960.
    2. Students will be able to name two groups that participated in the Pittsburgh Civil Rights Movement and their leaders.
    3. Students will be able to discuss the techniques employed by civil rights groups to achieve equality.
    4. Student will make an oral presentation, in class, about the movement, its organizations, its targets and/or the individual participants.
    5. Students will be able to tell about the overall results of the movement in the areas of employment, education and public accommodations.
    Listed Topics
    1. The racial climate in Pittsburgh prior to 1960 and how Black citizens were treated
    2. The organizations and their methodology: what techniques were used
    3. The leaders of the movement. Who were they? What did they do
    4. The businesses, government organizations and other groups that were targeted by the movement. Why were these groups targeted
    5. Reaction to the movement. What happened to participants
    6. Results of the movement. Were major changes made
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, films, videos and guest speakers.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/24/2004


    Course and Section Search



Film Making

  
  • FLM 103 - Film Production 1


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on student-created fiction filmmaking through the five-part production process. It explores cooperation, communication and the effort required by all departments to work together in a studio environment. Film projects will be assigned to teams to set up required elements and shoot scenes under specific conditions and expected outcomes. Planning concepts include scripting, script breakdown, casting, securing permits and locations, crew designations, scheduling budgeting, filming on location, sound recording and editing.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper techniques in scheduling all required departments on a film crew.
    2. Develop a script for evaluation in a team setting on required elements within budget guidelines.
    3. Produce a schedule to set-up and restore any studio or location.
    4. Define crew expectations and their hierarchy.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to work within a team and complete responsibilities on time, within budget and following accepted safe practices.
    6. Produce a short film.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew roles and responsibilities
    2. Scheduling, collaboration and communication
    3. Transportation of equipment, crew and cast
    4. Script text analysis
    5. Permit applications and securing locations
    6. Production forms and completion
    7. Basic camera use
    8. Basic sound recording
    9. Basic editing
    10. Film festival strategy
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Media, Lecture, Internet and Textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 104 - Production Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to problem-solving techniques and technical tools used to manage a production for the television and film industry. Students learn to read and manage a call sheet as well as several other documents necessary in film production. Students also learn skills necessary to become a production assistant in the film industry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the job responsibilities of a production assistant.
    2. Identify necessary components to write a call sheet.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to break down a script.
    4. Manage all aspects of a film production, including finding solutions to problems arising during production 
    5. Utilize the daily schedule to map the film team’s production goals.
    Listed Topics
    1. Call sheet
    2. Script breakdown
    3. Movie scheduling program
    4. Permit applications and securing locations
    5. The flow of a film day
    6. Errand runs
    7. Petty cash management
    8. Hierarchy of a film set
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks, Cameras and Film Equipment
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 09/26/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 105 - Film and Video Editing 1, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on editing techniques used in film and video media using a computer. It will explore editing for film, commercial, news, documentary and industrial videos. Students will edit videos on approved editing and compositing programs. Students will breakdown edits. Students will consider various elements of an edit.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Utilize editing program.
    2. Utilize compositing program.
    3. Recognize and use various editing paradigms.
    4. Break down edits for film language use.
    5. Create various edits.
    Listed Topics
    1. Edit programs
    2. Timeline coordination
    3. Editing department structure
    4. Import/export techniques
    5. Codecs
    Reference Materials
    Films, books and internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 106 - Introduction to Filmmaking, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is a basic introduction to the film making process. Students will make a simple short film together as a team. It explores cooperation, communication and the effort required by all departments to work together on a set.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper techniques in scheduling a short independent film.
    2. Develop a script for a short independent group film.
    3. Define crew and cast job responsibilities.
    4. Demonstrate basic film equipment use. 
    5. Produce a group short film.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew roles and responsibilities
    2. Scheduling, collaboration and communication
    3. Script writing, mechanics, and formatting
    4. Basic film equipment use
    5. Basic editing
    6. Actor direction
    Reference Materials
    Online videos, free digital documents.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 107 - Film and Video Scriptwriting 1, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will focus on scriptwriting. It will explore writing for film, commercial, news, documentary and industrial videos. Students will write scripts and look at script formatting. Students will breakdown scripts. Students will consider various elements of a script. Students will read scripts and learn the basics of script coverage.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Utilize scriptwriting program.
    2. Recognize and use various script paradigms.
    3. Break down scripts for script coverage.
    4. Create various scripts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Various script formats
    2. Script writing programs
    3. Writers Guild of America
    4. Script coverage
    Reference Materials
    Films, scripts, books and internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 110 - Basic Construction Film/Media Production


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course trains students in basic carpentry and construction techniques applicable to the film and media production industry. Hand and power tools, rigging and safety will be discussed. The opportunity to build scenery will be a major course component.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify appropriate safety behavior regarding hand and power tools.
    2. Construct scenery as required for film and media productions.
    3. Operate within a team to complete necessary exercises.
    4. Examine rigging techniques and knots for rope and wire strength and safety.
    5. Identify appropriate cutting techniques following recommended process for safety and efficiency.
    6. Demonstrate an appropriate response to marking, measuring and cutting accuracy.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hand tools
    2. Hand power tools and pneumatics
    3. Major power tools
    4. Tool safety operation
    5. Tool maintenance
    6. Building techniques
    7. Scenery shift and lifting
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Media, Lecture, Internet and Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 111 - Introduction to Film Technician


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces the various crew positions employed in the film industry. Construction, scenic paint, grip, electric, props, set dressing, wardrobe and special effects make-up will be introduced to the student to help with choosing a specialty.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the responsibilities of each crew position.
    2. Compare and contrast the film crew skills required for each crew position.
    3. Identify career goals to available skill set.
    4. Develop an individualized plan leading to a career as a film technician.
    Listed Topics
    1. Construction techniques
    2. Scenic paint techniques
    3. Grip techniques
    4. Set lighting technician techniques
    5. Props techniques
    6. Set dressing techniques
    7. Wardrobe techniques
    8. Special effects make-up techniques
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks, Cameras and Film Equipment
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 113 - Set Dressing for Film


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces set dressing as it relates to completing the film milieu. Students will learn about basic electric wiring, power tools, safe lifting and working with a truck. Students will learn to work together on a crew to transform a studio set or location, how to load, secure and unload a vehicle used to transport required furniture, props and fixtures and awareness of the schedule for the day’s effort.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the responsibilities of the set dressing crew.
    2. Examine set dressing tasks.
    3. Demonstrate tying a variety of rope knots.
    4. Dress a studio or location set.
    5. Recognize hot set continuity related to end of a shoot day.
    6. Demonstrate proper body mechanics in repetitive lifting.
    7. Demonstrate safety techniques for cargo and crew.
    Listed Topics
    1. Knots, rope and packing
    2. Loading and unloading trucks
    3. Basic electricity and wiring
    4. Hand and power tool safety and usage
    5. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    6. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) and non-union rules
    7. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) compliance
    8. Bodymechanics
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Media, Internet, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 114 - Costuming for Film


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course concentrates on the costuming process in film making with a focus on costuming on set. Students will gather and manage costumes for a short film production and spend time on set with them while filming. Measuring, fitting, care and inventory will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize management hierarchy and staff responsibilities in a costume department.
    2. Describe costume construction and how to measure and fit according to costume charts for each actor.
    3. Utilize wardrobe specific tools necessary to manage clothing.
    4. Describe and perform daily duties of a costumer on a film during prep, shoot and wrap.
    5. Perform costume continuity.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) union and non-union rules
    3. Measurement of actors
    4. Inventory
    5. Care and maintenance of costumes 
    6. Daily duties of a set costumer
    7. Costume history design and palette
    8. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    9. Aging, stain removal, blood work and quick fixes on set
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 115 - Craft Service for Film


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces craft service that provides nourishment and hydration to crew on a film production. Budgets, inventory, food safety certification requirements, equipment and organization are discussed. An opportunity to work in a studio or on location will be part of the class.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Examine work-site differences related to a studio and on location.
    2. Identify the responsibilities and hierarchy of craft service management.
    3. Develop budgets with production based on expected crew hires.
    4. Identify menu requirements and storage of inventory based on location.
    5. Determine preparation with inventory adjustments during long days on location.
    6. Evaluate how inclement weather will affect craft service delivery of inventory.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) union and non-union rules
    3. Scheduled day preparation
    4. Inventory and equipment maintenance
    5. Care and storage of budgeted items
    6. Shopping for budgeted products
    7. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    8. Food safety and certification
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 120 - Basics of Prop Making


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to prop making for stage and screen. The student will learn how to make basic props of their own design using one or a variety of techniques learned in this course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe how to design and produce a prop that can be used on stage or in a movie production.
    2. Examine how props are made specific to usage on stage or in a movie.
    3. Design a prop using techniques discussed in class.
    4. Create the prop according to budget and materials available.
    5. Incorporate constructive criticism into prop redesign.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sculpting
    2. Moldmaking
    3. Foam carving
    4. Casting
    5. Painting
    6. Upcycling
    7. Repurposing
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 121 - Special Effects Makeup


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to practical film special effects makeup. The student will learn to lifecast a model and use the lifecast to sculpt, mold, cast and apply a full face prosthetic.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Execute the application of a full face foam latex prosthetic.
    2. Apply a lifecast on a fellow student.
    3. Create a corrected positive of the lifecast.
    4. Sculpt a prosthetic using oil based clay.
    5. Incorporate constructive criticism in special effects makeup.
    6. Utilize the design as incorported within material parameters.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sculpting
    2. Moldmaking
    3. Foam latex
    4. Casting
    5. Painting
    6. Lifecasting
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 122 - Mask Making and Casting 1


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to practical film special effects. The students will sculpt, mold and cast a latex mask of their own design.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify a basic understanding of sculpture in regards to mask making and how it relates to film special effects.
    2. Examine how to sculpt a mask using water-based clay.
    3. Develop applicable techniques to mold a mask using traditional stone molding.
    4. Exercise techniques to cast a mask out of latex and prep for paint.
    5. Finish mask for use.
    6. Incorporate constructive criticism in mask making and casting.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sculpting
    2. Moldmaking
    3. Casting
    4. Painting
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 131 - Grip and Electric 1


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces techniques, skills and vocabulary necessary to work as a grip or set lighting technician in the film and media production industry.  Multiple lighting and rigging exercises will be performed and students will become acquainted with basic grip and lighting techniques.  Work on a film set will be an integral component of this beginning class. 
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate grip and set lighting technician functions on a film set.
    2. Assign appropriate crew according to production requirements.
    3. Demonstrate learned skills under supervision of a gaffer and a best boy.
    4. Apply learned skills under multiple lighting and scene movement exercises.
    5. Choose appropriate lighting techniques to achieve desired result.
    6. Describe the tools and responsibilities of a grip in a studio versus location shooting.
    7. Describe the tools and responsibilities of a set lighting technician under various lighting conditions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Grip tools
    2. Rigging and knots
    3. Grip and lighting crew hierarchy
    4. Lighting fixtures
    5. Basic electricity
    6. Cable
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Internet, Textbook
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 140 - Film Sound 1


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to working in the production sound department and post-production sound department. Students will learn microphone use, sound enhancements, volume and the recording techniques used on location and in the studio. Students will also learn basic film sound editing techniques.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Examine techniques of a sound department and post-sound department.
    2. Identify the responsibilities and hierarchy of a film sound crew.
    3. Arrange work with production to determine schedules and sound requirements as it relates to environment and conditions.
    4. Predict inventory adjustments for long days on location.
    5. Prepare for inclement weather on location shooting.
    6. Identify equipment requirements based on ambient noise.
    7. Troubleshoot sound equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Scheduled day preparation
    3. Inventory and equipment maintenance
    4. Care and storage of budgeted items
    5. Boom pole and techniques
    6. Microphones and recorders
    7. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Audio Recordings, Textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 150 - Scenic Paint for Film


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces the students to scenic artistry applicable to film productions. Paint theory, color, materials and techniques for period aging, signs, sets and furniture will be discussed. Opportunities to paint on a film or theatre set will be offered.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify painting techniques to achieve agreed upon end results.
    2. Utilize painting equipment.
    3. Investigate color theory to achieve expected outcomes.
    4. Exercise acquired skills on a film paint crew.
    5. Develop techniques to paint with new material and period age for effect.
    6. Develop techniques to highlight and shadow.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Scheduled day preparation
    3. Paint, dye and treatments
    4. Care and storage of budgeted items
    5. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 161 - Cinematography 1


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103   or Instructor Permission.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to cinematography. Students will study the equipment and techniques used to shoot television and film productions. They will plan, shoot and edit a project. Students will communicate and cooperate with student film crews to complete projects.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Research painting and photography techniques used for framing and lighting.
    2. Create a lookbook to focus visual aspects of production.
    3. Utilize a light meter to expose an image properly.
    4. Develop techniques for image focusing.
    5. Tell the story through the camera lens.
    6. Produce storyboards to communicate the creative vision.
    7. Utilize camera equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Scheduled day preparation
    3. Camera and equipment
    4. Light and color
    5. Care and storage of budgeted items
    6. Visual storytelling
    7. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks, Cameras and Film Equipment
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 170 - Film Direction of the Actor


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the creative techniques and technical aspects used to work with actors in television and film productions. Students will direct and workshop scenes involving actors.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Show examples of direction for actors in rehearsal and on a film set.
    2. Create improvisational sessions for actors to develop spontaneity.
    3. Lead actors through a sense memory technique for emotional connection to character.
    4. Develop skills to become adept at seeing and guiding the story through the actor’s decisions.
    5. Utilize techniques on set to create a mood.
    6. Identify the major acting disciplines to understand how to maximize the actor’s training.
    Listed Topics
    1. The moment before
    2. Complex purposeful blocking
    3. The love scene
    4. Camera placement
    5. Contrast in acting and directing
    6. Sense memory
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks, Cameras and Film Equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/01/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 201 - Navigating the Film Industry


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites:   FLM 202  or FLM 161  or instructor permission

     
    Description
    This course will discuss the local, state and national film industry and the role that specific crew members play.  Film crew hierarchy, set etiquette, union membership and film history will be discussed. Specific crew and department alignments will be introduced so that the film technician student can make informative decisions about the direction their training will follow. Special emphasis is placed on decoding the Pittsburgh film industry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Differentiate roles within departments contributing to film production.
    2. Describe union and non-union responsibilities.
    3. Define the role that the crew has on a film set including established set rules and etiquette.
    4. Examine the role of the crew in the history of film making.
    5. Identify safety procedures.
    6. Create an individual industry-specific career plan with cover letter, resume and business card. 
    7. Explore local films, crew members, groups and production companies.
    8. Explore local and state film offices.

     Listed Topics

    1. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) and non-union rules
    2. Film production history
    3. Set etiquette
    4. Film crew hierarchy
    5. Crew roles and responsibilities
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Lecture, Internet, Textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Culture Society and Citzenship
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 202 - Production Design for Film


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 110   or instructor permission.

     
    Description
    This course will explore production design on location and in interior and exterior studio environments. Art direction and coordination of all crew components will also be explored. Students will design and build a set. Students will work in an art department on a film. Budgets, transportation, locations and crew safety will be explored.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Cite the requirements of scenic construction and paint for a completed set.
    2. Review blueprints for accurate execution of scenery in the shop, in the studio and on location.
    3. Implement property and set dressing requirements based on agreed upon lists.
    4. Recognize scheduling of required components for studio and location productions.
    5. Identify required production forms following budget guidelines.
    6. Identify safety components required for construction, transportation, set-up and dismantling of scenery. 
    7. Create production design and scenery using a computer software program.
    8. Fabricate a complete set wall.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew roles and responsibilities
    2. Scheduling, collaboration and communication
    3. Appropriate construction techniques
    4. Production forms, budgeting and completion
    5. Lookbooks
    6. Color pallets
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Media, Lecture, Internet and Textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 203 - Film Production 2, Experimental


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103  

     
    Description
    This course focuses on student and faculty created films. It builds on techniques taught in Film Production 1 with  longer, sustained projects. It explores cooperation, communication and the effort required by all departments to work together in a studio environment. Each student will complete their own film, and work on other students and faculty films. Film projects will be assigned to teams to set up required elements and shoot scenes under specific conditions and expected outcomes. Planning concepts include script breakdown, casting, securing permits and locations, crew designations, scheduling and budgeting.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Utilize techniques in scheduling all required departments on a film crew.
    2. Develop a finished film utilizing the filmmaking process.
    3. Describe the application process for required permits for shooting locations.
    4. Produce a schedule to set-up and restore any studio or location.
    5. Define crew expectations and their hierarchy.
    6. Show ability to work within a team and complete responsibilities on time, within budget and following accepted safe practices.
    7. Explain awareness of safety components required for construction, transportation set-up and dismantling film equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Common workplace rules
    2. Crew roles and responsibilities
    3. Scheduling, collaboration and communication
    4. Transportation
    5. Script text analysis
    6. Permit applications and securing locations
    7. Editing techniques
    8. Music usage in film projects
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Media, Lecture, Internet and Textbooks.


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 204 - Film Budgeting, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 104   or instructor permission

     
    Description
    This course explores the film production accounting cycle. Students will learn to navigate a film’s financials from budget to production wrap. Students will learn how accounting principles drive and flex in the creative process of filmmaking.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Build a general understanding of a film production accounting cycle.
    2. Analyze a timecard breakdown for earnings.
    3. Solve industry standard film budgeting software.
    4. Analyze a script for accounting.
    5. Generate budgets for film industry examples.
    6. Investigate general budgeting principles.
    7. Examine production budgeting terminology.
    8. Produce payroll and accounts payable budgets.
    Listed Topics
    1. Job duties and responsibilities
    2. Accounts payable process
    3. Contracts
    4. Film unions and guilds
    5. Union and non-union budgets
    6. Tax credits
    7. Scripted and unscripted production models
    8. Per Diem
    9. Petty Cash


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 210 - Advanced Construction and Location Work


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 110   or instructor permission

     
    Description
    This course explores construction techniques applicable to ordinary and unique locations. Scenery execution, installation and restoration exercises are used to train a crew to leave no evidence after a film shoots in a studio or at a location.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Build and install scenery in a studio or location.
    2. Demonstrate loading and unloading vehicles used for transporting scenery.
    3. Exercise appropriate use and care of hand, power, pneumatic and other tool systems.
    4. Recognize crew expectations and responsibilities.
    5. Work within a team and maintain budget goals.
    6. Utilize appropriate techniques regarding safety components required for construction, transportation, set up and dismantling scenery and salvaging any appropriate materials.
    Listed Topics
    1. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) and non-union rules
    2. Collective bargaining agreements
    3. Crew roles and responsibilities
    4. Scheduling, collaboration and communication
    5. Transportation
    6. Script analysis
    7. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) compliance
    8. Production forms and completion
    9. Build and install scenery
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Media, Lecture, Internet and Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 220 - Film Location Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103  or instructor permission

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to film location management. Students will receive both lecture and hands-on instruction focused on the production of film and electronic media projects in remote or on-location settings. Skill areas will include cooperation and communication with all departments as part of a film crew.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Formulate the list of necessary locations required in the script being filmed.
    2. Identify the process for reserving permits and location approvals working with local agencies.
    3. Develop a schedule that cooperates with other departments on a film crew in a studio or on a location.
    4. Compose a daily production journal.
    5. Manage the public on a film location.
    6. Develop a scouting report.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Scheduled day preparation
    3. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    4. Permits and securing locations
    5. Call sheets
    6. Safety on locations
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks, Cameras, Forms and Film Equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 222 - Mask Making and Casting 2, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 2 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 122  

     
    Description
    This course will contine to build the skills introduced in Mask Making and Casting 1. Students will learn additional practical application of theatre and film special effects. They will sculpt, mold and cast 2 latex masks using advanced materials and techniques. The final exam will be the execution and completion of their masks.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify a advanced understanding of sculpture in regard to mask making.
    2. Develop advanced techniques to mold masks using traditional stone molding techniques.
    3. Employ new techniques with vacuum forming and foam construction.
    4. Build skill levels with additional time using paint and finish materials.
    5. Refine design aspects having experienced basic and advanced technical instruction.
    6. Accept constructive direction and criticism.
    Listed Topics
    1. Advanced Sculpting
    2. Advanced Moldmaking
    3. Advanced Casting
    4. Advanced Painting
    5. Vacuum Form Process
    6. Foam Construction
    Reference Materials
    Lectures, Films, Videos, Textbooks


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 231 - Grip and Electric 2


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 4 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 131  

     
    Description
    This course expands upon the techniques, skills and vocabulary learned in FLM 131  - Grip and Electric 1. Multiple lighting and rigging exercises will be performed. Students will become acquainted with intermediate to advanced lighting and grip techniques and grip equipment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate advanced function beyond the entry level capacity of a film grip or electrician.
    2. Develop expertise with moving lights and dimmers.
    3. Identify proper green and blue screen lighting techniques.
    4. Develop dolly grip techniques.
    5. Expand expertise with specialized lighting instruments.
    6. Utilize large rigging tools.
    7. Examine single phase and three phase power distribution and their parameters.
    8. Recognize the needs of a location shoot from a lighting and grip perspective.
    Listed Topics
    1. Blue and green screen lighting techniques
    2. Color correction and temperature
    3. Laying and leveling dolly track
    4. Specialized lighting fixtures
    5. Rigging techniques and tools
    6. Single and three phase power
    Reference Materials
    Film, Video, Internet, Textbook
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 240 - Film Sound 2


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 140  

     
    Description
    This course builds on FLM 140  introducing advanced production sound recording and film sound editing techniques.  Students will master the aural forces that make film an expressive means of communication. The student will utilize an industry standard editing system.  Experience editing film sound recordings will be made available.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Utilize an industry standard sound editing system.
    2. Design a plan with the production team to reach desired sound goals for clarity and dynamics.
    3. Edit sound for a film production.
    4. Create sounds for use in a film.
    5. Utilize foley pits to match sounds.
    6. Conduct an automated dialogue replacement (ADR) recording session.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Scheduled day preparation
    3. Sound software
    4. Director and concept
    5. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 251 - Advanced Scenic Paint and Location Work


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 150  

     
    Description
    This course expands upon the skills developed in FLM 150  - Scenic Paint for Film. Students will be introduced to advanced techniques required to paint on location. Spraying, mold making, marbling, staining and varnishing will be covered. Opportunities to paint on a film or theatre set will be offered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Examine advanced painting techniques.
    2. Operate spraying equipment properly.
    3. Participate on a student paint crew.
    4. Demonstrate the functions of a scenic charge.
    5. Identify new materials and applications.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Scheduled day preparation
    3. Stains and varnish
    4. Care and storage of budgeted items
    5. Spraying and safety
    6. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) compliance
    7. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 261 - Cinematography 2


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 161  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon skills learned in FLM 161  - Cinematography 1. Students will learn advanced visual composition in film and television. Students will demonstrate an understanding of picture techniques to produce a meaningful and cohesive visual story. Students will interact with film crews to complete projects.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply custom look-up tables (LUT).
    2. Examine the history of film techniques, previous cinematic styles and advanced technology.
    3. Shoot a film from start to finish using student crews.
    4. Compose a daily production journal.
    5. Develop advanced skills with camera and equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. Advanced camera skills
    3. Coloring the final product
    4. Scheduled day preparation
    5. Budgeting and recordkeeping
    6. Visual choices and style
    Reference Materials
    Lecture, Films, Videos, Textbooks, Cameras and Film Equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 403 - Film Cooperative Learning Project


    Credits: 3
    150 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103  

     
    Description
    Students will work within a team or on a film project for 150 hours.  This field experience course can be taken after courses within a specialty have been completed and/or when an opportunity to work has become available.  Students will communicate and cooperate with film crews on location to complete projects.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Maintain a daily journal through the production process to allow reflection.
    2. Perform film-related work using appropriate technology under the direction of a supervisor.
    3. Develop skills, based on specialty, to work as a member of a film crew.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a collaborative team.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) union and non-union rules
    3. How to prepare for scheduled days
    4. Budgeting and forms
    5. On-location safety
    6. Professionalism and work ethic
    Reference Materials
    As determined by supervisor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 404 - Film Culminating Experience


    Credits: 4
    200 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103 , FLM 161 , FLM 202  instructor permission and project proposal acceptance

     
    Description
    Students will propose and accept to work within a team or on a film project for 200 hours.  This capstone course will be taken after courses within a specialty have been completed.  Students will communicate and cooperate with film crews to complete projects


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop a pathway to obtain industry certification.
    2. Perform mentoring of first year film students.
    3. Demonstrate skills based on specialty while working as a member of a film crew.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a collaborative team.
    5. Document the process of carrying out the culminating project.
    6. Present a project at course completion.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) union and non-union rules
    3. How to prepare for scheduled days
    4. Budgeting and forms
    5. On-location safety
    6. Professionalism and work ethic
    7. Portfolio building
    Reference Materials
    As determined by project
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FLM 406 - Film Cooperative Learning Project


    Credits: 6
    300 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: FLM 103  

     
    Description
    Students will work within a team or on a film project for 300 hours.  This field experience course can be taken after courses within a specialty have been completed and/or when an opportunity to work has become available.  Students will communicate and cooperate with film crews on location to complete projects.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Maintain a daily journal through the production process to allow reflection.
    2. Perform film-related work using appropriate technology under the direction of a supervisor.
    3. Develop skills, based on specialty, to work as a member of a film crew.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a collaborative team.
    Listed Topics
    1. Crew hierarchy and responsibilities
    2. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) union and non-union rules
    3. How to prepare for scheduled days
    4. Budgeting and forms
    5. On-location safety
    6. Professionalism and work ethic
    Reference Materials
    As determined by supervisor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/14/2019


    Course and Section Search



Fire Science Administration

  
  • FSA 102 - Principle of Emergency Services


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview to fire protection; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; philosophy and history of fire protection/service; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service, fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to tactics and strategy.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe and discuss the components of the history and philosophy of the modern fire service.
    2. Analyze the basic components of fire as a chemical reaction, the major phases of fire and examine the main factors that influence fire spread and fire behavior.
    3. Differentiate between fire service training and education; fire protection certificate program and fire service degree program; and explain the value of education in fire service.
    4. List and describe the major organizations that provide emergency response services and how they relate.
    5. Identify the fire protection and emergency service careers in both the public and in the private sectors.
    6. Synthesize the role of national, state and local support organizations in fire protection and emergency services.
    7. Discuss and describe the scope, purpose and organizational structure of fire and emergency services.
    8. Describe the common types of fire and emergency service facilities, equipment and apparatus.
    9. Compare and contrast effective management concepts for various emergency situations.
    10. Identify and explain the components of fire prevention including code enforcement, public information and public/private fire protection systems.
    11. Recognize the components of career preparation and goal setting.
    12. Describe the importance of wellness and fitness as it relates to emergency services.
    Listed Topics
    1. History and philosophy of modern day fire service
    2. Basic components and major phases of fire
    3. Fire spread and fire behavior
    4. Fire service training and education and the value of education in fire service
    5. Emergency response services organizations
    6. Fire protection and emergency service careers
    7. Fire protection and emergency services support organizations
    8. Scope, purpose and structure of fire and emergency services
    9. Fire and emergency service facilities, equipment and apparatus
    10. Management concepts in emergency situations
    11. Components of fire prevention
    12. Wellness and fitness
    Reference Materials
    Current editions of:
    Introduction to Fire Protection, Robert Klinoff, Delmar
    Introduction to Fire Science, Loren Bush, Glencoe
    Fire Protection Handbook, National Fire Protection Association
    Principles of Fire Protection, Bugbee & Cote, NFPA
    Firefighters Handbook, Delmar
    Fire Service Orientation and Terminology, IFSTA
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 06/17/2004


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  • FSA 103 - Fundamentals of Fire Prevention/Fire Code Enforcement


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides students with fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include the history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau and use and application of codes and standards. The course covers plan reviews, fire inspections, fire and life safety education and fire investigation.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define national fire problems and the role of fire prevention.
    2. Identify and describe fire prevention organizations and associations.
    3. Define laws, rules, regulations and codes relevant to fire prevention.
    4. Define the functions of a fire prevention bureau.
    5. Describe inspection practices and procedures. 
    6. Identify and describe the standards for professional qualifications for Fire Marshal, Plans Examiner, Fire Inspector, Fire and Life Safety Educator and Fire Investigator.
    7. List opportunities in professional development for fire prevention personnel.
    8. Describe the history and philosophy of fire prevention.
    9. Discuss the major fire programs for public education.
    Listed Topics
    1. National fire problems and role of fire prevention
    2. Fire prevention organizations and associations
    3. Laws, rules, regulations and codes
    4. Fire prevention bureau functions
    5. Tools and equipment
    6. Roles and responsibilities of fire prevention personnel
    7. Professional certification
    8. Professional development
    9. Public education
    Reference Materials
    Fire Protection: Code Enforcement 7
    Fire Inspection and Code Enforcement, IFSTA
    Fire and Life Safety Educator
    Introduction to Fire Prevention
    Life Safety Code 101 Handbook
    National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Handbook
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


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  • FSA 105 - Introduction to Fire and Emergency Services Administration


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent

     
    Description
    This course introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service, ethics and leadership from the perspective of the company officer.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the importance of ethics and communication skills as it relates to fire and emergency services.
    2. Describe basic theories of public sector management.
    3. Describe traits of effective versus ineffective management styles.
    4. Explain the concept of span of control, effective delegation and division of labor.
    5. Select and implement the appropriate disciplinary action based upon an employee’s conduct.
    6. Articulate the importance of the public policy process, responsibility and authority.
    7. Discuss various levels of leadership, roles and responsibilities within the organization.
    8. Explain the history of management and supervision methods and procedures.
    9. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS).
    Listed Topics
    1. New challenges and opportunities
    2. Communication process
    3. Management principles
    4. Tools for employee development
    5. Managing resources for emergency and non-emergency
    6. Safety assessment: emergency and non-emergency
    7. Leadership styles, roles and responsbilities
    8. Supervision and management
    9. Ethics
    10. Incident management system
    11. Data management
    Reference Materials
    Company Officer (2005) Clinton Smoke, Delmar
    U.S. Fire Administration Publications
    http://www.dhs.gov/files/publications/gc_1287505987950.shtm
    NIMS Resource Center
    Incident Command Systems (ICS)
    http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nims/IncidentCommandSystem.shtm
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FSA 106 - Elements of Building Construction


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent

     
    Description
    This course delineates the components of building construction that pertain to fire and life safety. The focus of this course is on fire fighter safety. The elements of building construction and design of structures are shown to be the key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations and operating at incidents.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection and firefighting strategy and tactics.
    2. Classify major types of building construction.
    3. Analyze the hazards and tactical considerations associated with the various types of building construction.
    4. Explain the different loads and stresses that are placed on a building and their interrelationships.
    5. Identify the principal structural components of buildings and demonstrate an understanding of the function of each.
    6. Differentiate between fire resistance and flame spread, and describe the testing procedures used to establish ratings for each.
    7. Identify the indicators of potential structural failure as they relate to firefighter safety.
    8. Define the characteristics of water as a fire suppression agent.
    9. Compare other methods and techniques of fire extinguishments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Building construction regarding firefighter safety, codes, fire prevention and code inspection
    2. Firefighting strategy and tactics
    3. Types of building construction
    4. Hazards and other considerations relating to building construction types
    5. Building loads and stresses
    6. Structural components of buildings and their functions
    7. Fire resistance and flame spread, testing procedures and ratings
    8. Structural failure indicators and firefighter safety
    9. Fire suppressant agents
    10. Fire extinguishments
    Reference Materials
    Current editions of:
    Building Construction for the Fire Service. Gtsmvod Ntsmmohsm. NFPA
    Building Construction for the Fire Service, IFSTA
    CD-ROM - USFA: Building Construction: Combustible and Non-Combustible
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 06/17/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FSA 107 - Fire Behavior and Combustion


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent and demonstrated competency of high school level Algebra or equivalent

     
    Description
    This course is a study of basic definitions of the physical properties and chemical characteristics applicable to fire; it also discusses combustion, the principles of fire, heat measurement, heat transfer and heat energy sources. Emphasis is on emergency situations and the most favorable methods of handling firefighting and control.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify physical properties of the three states of matter.
    2. Categorize the components of fire.
    3. Recall the chemical and physical properties of fire.
    4. Describe and apply the process of burning.
    5. Define and use basic terms and concepts associated with the chemistry and dynamics of fire.
    6. Describe the dynamics of fire.
    7. Discuss the various materials and their relationship to fires as fuel.
    8. Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of water as a fire suppression agent.
    9. Articulate other suppression agents and strategies.
    10. Compare other methods and techniques of fire extinguishment.
    Listed Topics
    1. The three states of matter.
    2. Components of fire and its physical and chemical properties.
    3. The process of burning and the dynamics of fire and its concepts.
    4. Terms and concepts related to the chemistry of fire.
    5. Fuel materials and their relationship to fire.
    6. Water as a fire suppression agent and other suppression agents.
    7. Methods, techniques and strategies of fire extinguishment.
    Reference Materials
    Fire Protection Handbook, National Fire Protection Association
    Principles of Fire Protection Chemistry and Physics, Ray Friedman, NFPA
    Principles of Fire Behavior, James Quintiere, Delmar
    Emergency Response Guide, US Department of Transportation
    Periodic Table of Elements
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 06/17/2004


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FSA 201 - Fire Protection Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent and demonstrated competency of high school level algebra or equivalent

     
    Description
    This course focuses on the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe basic elements of a public water supply system, including sources, distribution networks, piping and hydrants.
    2. Explain why water is a commonly used extinguishing agent.
    3. Identify different types and components of sprinkler, standpipe and foam systems.
    4. Review residential and commercial sprinkler legislation.
    5. Identify different types of non-water-based fire suppression systems.
    6. Explain basic components of a fire alarm system.
    7. Identify different types of detectors and explain how they detect fire.
    8. Describe hazards of smoke and list the four factors that can influence smoke movement in a building.
    9. Discuss appropriate applications of fire protection systems.
    10. Explain the operation and appropriate application for the different types of portable fire protection systems.
    11. Explain the benefits of fire protection systems in various types of structures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to fire protection systems
    2. Water supply systems for fire protection systems
    3. Water-based fire suppression systems
    4. Non-water-based fire suppression systems
    5. Fire alarm systems
    6. Smoke management systems
    7. Portable fire extinguishers
    8. Benefits of fire protection systems
    Reference Materials
    Current editions of:
    Fire Protection Handbook, National Fire Protection Association
    Private Fire Protection and Detection Systems, IFSTA
    Automatic Sprinkler and Standpipe Systems, John Bryan, NFPA
    Fire Protection and Detection Systems, Bryan, MacMillan Publishing
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


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  • FSA 203 - Firefighting Strategy and Tactics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent

     
    Description
    This course provides students with the principles of fire ground control through utilization of personnel, equipment and extinguishing agents.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create firefighting strategy and implement appropriate tactics.
    2. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System(ICS), as it relates to strategy and tactics.
    3. Execute ICS/NIMS at incident locations.
    4. Discuss fire behavior, as it relates to strategies and tactics.
    5. Explain the main components of pre-fire planning and identify steps needed for a pre-fire plan review.
    6. Identify the basics of building construction and how they interrelate to pre-fire planning, strategy and tactics.
    7. Describe the steps taken during size-up.
    8. Examine the significance of fire ground communications.
    Listed Topics
    1. Roles and responsibilities in ICS/NIMS
    2. Fire chemistry terms and concepts
    3. Pre-fire planning
    4. Operating procedures and guidelines in emergency operations
    5. Incident command tools and techniques
    6. Extinguishing equipment
    7. Basic division of tactics and size-up
    8. Rescue, exposures, confinement, ventilation and salvage
    Reference Materials
    Structural Firefighting: Strategy and Tactics
    NIMS Resource Center
    Incident Command Systems (ICS)
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FSA 205 - Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent and FSA 107  and FSA 105  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives. The course focuses on the need for cultural and behavioral change throughout emergency services.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and explain the 16 life safety initiatives.
    2. Explain concepts of risk management and mitigation as it pertains to emergency services, including strategic and tactical decision-making and planning responsibilities.
    3. Define the need for cultural and behavioral change within emergency services, related to safety.
    4. Explain the need for enhancements of personal and organizational accountability for health and safety.
    5. Illustrate how technological advancements produce higher levels of emergency service safety and survival.
    6. Explain the vital role of local departments in national research and data collection systems.
    7. Describe the importance of public education as a resource to life safety programs.
    8. Discuss the importance of standards in design of apparatus and equipment, including personal protective equipment and enforcement of codes.
    9. Adopt standardized policies for responding to emergency scenes.
    10. Identify support services for emergency services personnel.
    11. Describe and evaluate circumstances that might constitute an unsafe act.
    12. Explain the concept of empowering all emergency services personnel to stop unsafe acts.
    13. Validate the need for national training standards as they correlate to professional development inclusive of qualifications, certifications, and re-certifications.
    14. Defend the need for annual medical evaluations and the establishment of physical fitness criteria for emergency services personnel throughout their careers.
    15. Explain the importance of investigating all near-misses, injuries and fatalities.
    16. Discuss how incorporating the lessons learned from investigations can support cultural change throughout the emergency services.
    17. Describe how obtaining grants can support safety and survival initiatives.
    18. Explain how the increase in violent incidents impacts safety for emergency services personnel when responding to emergency scenes.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of fire service culture
    2. Organizational culture
    3. Defining the nature of the problem
    4. The national context, health and safety
    5. NFPA, OSHA
    6. Data collection (NFIRS)
    7. Research/investigation (NIST, NIOSH)
    8. Training, equipment, response
    9. Organizational health and safety profile
    10. Risk management
    11. Prevention
    12. Professional development qualifications
    13. Medication evaluations
    14. Lessons learned
    15. Grants
    Reference Materials
    Current editions of:
    16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives at www.everyonegoeshome.com
    Understanding and Implementing Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival (2012)
    The 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives, Current Edition
    Firefighter Life Safety Summit Initial Report
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FSA 206 - Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent and demonstrated competency of high school level algebra or equivalent

     
    Description
    This course provides students with the theoretical knowledge to identify the principles of the use of water in fire protection. Additionally, students will apply hydraulic principles to analyze and solve water supply problems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply water hydraulic principles.
    2. Calculate water hydraulics as it relates to fire protection.
    3. Identify design principles of fire service pumping apparatus.
    4. Analyze community fire flow demand criteria.
    5. Define principles of forces that affect water, both at rest and in motion.
    6. List and describe the various types of water distribution systems.
    7. Discuss various types of fire pumps.
    Listed Topics
    1. Water as an extinguishing agent
    2. Math review
    3. Fire streams
    4. Friction loss and engine pressures
    5. Water at rest and water in motion
    6. Water distribution systems
    7. Standpipe and sprinkler systems
    8. Fire pumps
    Reference Materials
    Fire Protection Handbook, National Fire Protection Association
    Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply Analysis
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


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  • FSA 207 - Hazardous Materials Chemistry


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  FSA 107  and CHM 109  or CHM 110 /CHM 111  

     
    Description
    This course provides students with basic chemical knowledge related to the categories of hazardous materials, including recognition, identification, reactivity and health hazards encountered by emergency services.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the chemistry of hazardous materials.
    2. Utilize Department of Transportation (DOT) guidebooks effectively.
    3. Identify and describe the common elements of the Periodic Table.
    4. Distinguish between elements, compounds and mixtures related to fires involving hazardous materials.
    5. Explain the difference between ionic and covalent bonding in fire science.
    6. Define the basic chemistry involved with common hydrocarbon derivatives.
    7. Describe the basic chemical and physical properties of gases, liquids and solids.
    8. Discuss the nine U.S. Department of Transportation hazard classes and their respective divisions.
    9. Utilize guidebooks, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and other reference materials to determine an initial course of action in fires involving hazardous materials.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hazardous Materials Chemistry I
    2. Matter and energy
    3. Chemical forms of matter
    4. Principles of chemical reactions
    5. Chemistry of common elements
    6. Flammable gases and liquids
    7. Chemistry of hazardous organic compounds
    8. Chemistry of corrosive materials
    9. Chemistry of water-reactive materials
    10. U.S. Department of Transportation Hazard Classes
    11. Hazardous materials in fixed facilities
    12. Response guidelines
    Reference Materials
    Hazardous Material Incidents (Christopher Hawley, Delmar)
    Hazardous Materials Chemistry (Armando Bevelacqua, Delmar)
    Standards 471 & 472, National Fire Protection Association
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


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  • FSA 209 - Fire Investigation 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102  or equivalent, FSA 105  FSA 106  and FSA 107  

     
    Description
    This course provides an overview of the fundamentals and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations. This includes recognizing and conducting origin and cause investigations, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of fire setters and types of fire causes.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Document evidence collection and scene security processes needed for successful resolution.
    2. Explain the process of conduction of fire origin and cause.
    3. Identify processes of proper documentation.
    4. Describe implications of constitutional amendments as they apply to fire investigations.
    5. Identify key case law decisions that have affected fire investigations.
    6. Define common terms used in fire investigations.
    7. Describe the process of conducting investigations using the scientific method.
    8. Explain basic elements of fire dynamics and how they affect cause determination.
    9. Explain procedures used for investigating vehicle fires.
    10. Identify characteristics of an incendiary fire and common motives of the fire setter.
    Listed Topics
    1. Emergency responder responsibilities and observations
    2. Constitutional law
    3. Case studies
    4. Fire investigations terminology
    5. Basic elements of fire dynamics
    6. Fire scene investigations
    7. Determining point of origin
    8. Types of fire causes
    9. Vehicle fires
    10. Fire setters
    Reference Materials
    Introduction to Fire Origin and Cause, Current Edition
    Fire Investigator, Current Edition
    Kirk’s Fire Investigation (2007)
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/28/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • FSA 210 - Emergency Services Course Delivery


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A study of an emergency services instructor’s responsibility in idea communication, learning and teaching concepts, job analysis, teaching objectives, instructional aid use and performance objectives.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and explain several teaching concepts and selection of an effective method.
    2. Explain methods used to communicate principles and ideas to the learner.
    3. Identify and list the important points of job and training needs analysis.
    4. Apply learned principles to design simple performance evaluation criteria.
    Listed Topics
    1. Teaching concepts and effective teaching methods.
    2. Effective communication of principles and ideas.
    3. Analysis of job and training needs.
    4. Design of performance evaluation criteria.
    Reference Materials
    Fire and Emergency Services Instructor & Student Manuals I-II, IFSTA
    Std 1041, National Fire Protection Association
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 06/17/2004


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  • FSA 211 - Fire Administration


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: FSA 102 , FSA 105  

     
    Description
    This course covers the principles of organization and administration in fire protection services; the structure and function of the department, battalion and company as components of municipal organization; duties and responsibilities of the company officer; a study of human resources management, training, budgeting, records, reports and other relations.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify career development opportunities and strategies for success.
    2. Explain the need for effective communication skills, both written and verbal.
    3. Articulate the concepts of span of control, effective delegation and division of labor.
    4. Recognize and apply appropriate appraising and disciplinary actions and the impact on employee behavior.
    5. Identify and examine the history and development of management and supervision.
    6. Evaluate methods of managing available resources.
    7. Identify roles and responsibilities of leaders in organizations.
    8. Compare and contrast the traits of effective versus ineffective supervision and management styles.
    9. Identify and assess safety needs for both emergency and non-emergency situations.
    10. Identify the importance of ethics as they apply to supervisors.
    11. Explain the role of company officer in the Incident Management System.
    12. Describe the benefits of documentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Career development opportunities.
    2. Effective written and oral communication skills.
    3. Span of control, effective delegation and division of labor.
    4. Employee appraising and disciplinary actions.
    5. History and development of management.
    6. Managing available resources.
    7. Roles and responsibilities of leaders.
    8. Traits of effective and ineffective supervision styles.
    9. Safety needs for emergency and non-emergency situations.
    10. Ethics for supervisors.
    11. Incident Management System
    12. Documentation benefits
    Reference Materials
    Company Officer, Clinton Smoke, Delmar
    Fire Service Administration, Grant & Hoover, NFPA
    Management in the Fire Service, Carter & Rausch, NFPA
    Management of Fire Service Operations, Coleman, NFPA
    Stds. 1021, 1500, 1710, 1720
     
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 06/17/2004


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Foreign Culture & Language

  
  • FCL 103 - World Mythology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This interdiscplinary course examines in cultural context the traditional stories – myths, legends and folktales – of the Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Incan, Mesoamerican and other civilizations. Students examine mythology from a cross-cultural perspective across a broad range of time periods and cultures. Topics focus on universal ideas, popular belief, superstition, rituals, human sacrifice, fertility, creation, heroes, deities, other-worlds and the socio-cultural basis of myths. Students analyze the connections these stories have with ritual practice and expressions of daily life, art and architecture. In addition, different theories of the cultural meanings and functions of myth are explored in the ancient, past and contemporary world. By studying mythology as an expression of human thought, students better understand themselves and the world in which they live and also appreciate the myths that they have explored as unique expressions of individual cultures.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain a basic knowledge of mythology, beliefs and traditions of ancient and past civilizations through readings and texts.
    2. Differentiate between mythology, religion and contemporary stories.
    3. Identify ancient and past civilizations and their mythology within the cultural areas discussed.
    4. Relate the historical background and cultural context of past civilizations’ myths to the significance of those myths today.
    5. Describe world diversity.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of how world mythology still influences contemporary society.
    Listed Topics
    1. Myths
    2. Religion
    3. Ancient civilizations
    4. History
    5. Art history
    6. Linguistics
    7. Language
    8. Hieroglyphic writing systems
    9. Epigraphy
    10. Decipherment
    11. Iconography
    12. World view
    13. Cultural diversity
    Reference Materials
    Books, handouts, electronic materials and/or readings selected by the Department.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • FCL 105 - Mesoamerican Myth and Culture


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This class is designed to increase the students’ knowledge of myths, culture and world view of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerican civilizations.  The class will begin with the earliest society the Olmec and move on to Zapotec, Mixtec, Teotihuacan, Toltec, Aztec and Maya.  Focus will be placed on the myths, culture and world view of Mesoamerican  civilizations.  In addition, the religion of these ancient civilizations will be examined and we will learn how cultural ideologies and world view played an important role in the formation of myths.  We will also analyze how pre-Hispanic cities (now archaeological sites) were designed (layout, art, iconography) around the civilizations’ mythology, world view and religion.  Lastly, we will discuss the effect that the arrival of Europeans had on pre-Hispanic peoples and determine the  consequences the Spanish conquest had on the Indigenous peoples of the Americas with reference to both myth and religion from the 16th century to the present.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop an increased knowledge of the myths and culture of ancient Mesoamerican civilizations.
    2. Explain why/how myth, world view and cultural practices strongly influence a society.
    3. Compare and contrast Mesoamerican myths to other civilizations mythology and also certain topics from the bible.
    4. Discuss the different types of calendar systems in use before and at the time of the conquest and why they were important to not only social structure but  politics.
    5. Identify those individuals from the 16th century that were responsible for the documenting the mythology and chronicles of pre-Hispanic Indigenous societies.
    6. Examine some of the ancient hieroglyphic writing systems in place in Mesoamerica in pre-Hispanic times.
    7. Relate pre-Hispanic civilizations to contemporary Mesoamerican communities.
    Listed Topics
    1. Myth
    2. Folklore
    3. Religion
    4. Ancient Civilizations
    5. History
    6. Art History
    7. Linguistics
    8. Language
    9. Hieroglyphic Writing Systems
    10. Epigraphy
    11. Decipherment
    12. Iconography
    13. World View
    14. Cultural Diversity
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, handouts, electronic materials and/or selected readings by the Professor
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


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  • FCL 109 - “It wasn’t Aliens!” Critically analyzing Pseudoarchaeology, Myths and Mysteries in the 21st Century/Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will increase the students’ awareness of Pseudoarchaeology, Myths and Mysteries in the 21st Century. Did Aliens build all the pyramids? Is the world really going to end yet again? Where is Atlantis, El Dorado? In recent years, there has been a steady and significant rise in the popularity of solving “ancient mysteries” and finding “lost civilizations” and “lost cities”. Why is this? Why are so many people apt to believe these claims? In this course, students will learn how to answer these questions by examining the role that pseudoarcheological theory and myth play through critically analyzing their impact on both history and society as a whole. Students will learn how to recognize these claims and will be presented with real archaeological, scientific and historical data that is used in order to counter them. By understanding the misuse and misrepresentation of archaeology and history, students will become better equipped to critically think about and postulate effective arguments against these theories and claims.        

     


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

    1. Develop critical thinking skills to analyze and evaluate pseudoacheaological claims and think about why archeology inspires such claims.
    2. Explain why/how myth, world view and cultural practices strongly influence a societies’ belief system.
    3. Identify pseudoarchaeological claims and myths in our own society.
    4. Discuss the ways in which these claims can be used.
    5. Examine real archaeological and historical data used to counter said claims.
    6. Learn about the actual people who really did build pyramids, create ancient writing systems etc. and how they did it.
    Listed Topics
    1. Myths
    2. Pseudoarchaeology
    3. Pseudoscience
    4. Religion
    5. Ancient Civilizations
    6. History
    7. Art History
    8. Linguistics
    9. Language
    10. Hieroglyphic Writing Systems
    11. Epigraphy
    12. Decipherment
    13. Iconography
    14. World View
    15. Cultural Diversity
    Reference Materials
    Books, handouts, electronic materials and/or selected readings by the Professor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship


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French Language & Culture

  
  • FRE 101 - Elementary French 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 100  and DVS 101  or DVS 103  

     
    Description
    This course is designed to encourage the development of communicative proficiency through an integrated approach that incorporates all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Grammatical structures, vocabulary and readings are presented as tools for developing good communications skills. In addition, this course aims to promote culture awareness of the French-speaking world.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply what they have learned both linguistically and culturally in a variety of situations.
    2. Utilize French language vocabulary, grammar and French cultural awareness.
    3. Translate level appropriate material.
    4. Write simple sentences.
    5. Communicate at a basic level in French.
    6. Use a low-mid novice level vocabulary both in and out of the classroom.
    7. Identify the difference between French and English grammar. Compare and contrast cultural differences among French speaking countries.
    Listed Topics
    1. Speaking
    2. Listening comprehension
    3. Reading
    4. Writing
    5. Vocabulary
    6. Grammar – Present, Present Participle
    Reference Materials
    Elementary French Textbook
    French/English Dictionary
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/19/2010


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  • FRE 102 - Elementary French 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of FRE 101  with a grade of “C” or better

     
    Description
    This course builds on the skills in Elementary French 1, as students continue to develop their communicative language skills in French. In addition, this course aims to promote cultural awareness of the French-speaking world. It is recommended that students take the next level FRE course (FRE 201 ) within one academic year of the completion of this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply what is learned both linguistically and culturally in a variety of situations.
    2. Utilize French language vocabulary, grammar and French cultural awareness.
    3. Translate level appropriate material.
    4. Write more detailed sentences and paragraphs.
    5. Communicate at a basic or better level in French.
    6. Use a high novice to low intermediate level vocabulary in and out of the classroom.
    7. Identify the difference between French and English grammar.
    8. Compare and contrast cultural differences among French speaking countries.
    Listed Topics
    1. Speaking
    2. Listening comprehension
    3. Reading
    4. Writing
    5. Vocabulary
    6. Grammar – Present, Present Participle, Preterite, Imperfect.
    7. Basic conversations
    Reference Materials
    Elementary French Textbook
    French/English Dictionary
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/19/2010


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  • FRE 201 - Intermediate French 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of FRE 102  with a grade of “C” or better

     
    Description
    This course builds on the skills acquired during the elementary French language sequence. It includes a functional review of the basic language structures and grammar, then introduces more complex structures. The course has a strong cultural component. It is recommended that students take the next level FRE course (FRE 202 ) within one academic year of the completion of this course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply what has been learned both linguistically and culturally in a variety of situations.
    2. Utilize the French language vocabulary, grammar and French cultural awareness.
    3. Translate level appropriate material. Write detailed paragraphs.
    4. Combine what has been learned in this course with what they have learned in the Elementary French courses to develop a more distinguished way of speaking.
    5. Communicate at an intermediate level in French.
    6. Use a mid to high intermediate level vocabulary in and out of the classroom.
    7. Identify phonological and syntactical differences between French and English grammar.
    8. Compare and contrast cultural differences among French speaking countries and the United States.

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/19/2010


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  • FRE 202 - Intermediate French 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of FRE 201  with a grade of “C” or better

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of the Intermediate French 1 course. Students continue to refine their language abilities, increase grammar comprehension and enhance their vocabulary. All grammatical structures are covered. The course has a very strong cultural component.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply what they have learned both linguistically and culturally in a variety of situations.
    2. Utilize French language vocabulary, grammar and French cultural awareness.
    3. Translate level appropriate material.
    4. Write detailed paragraphs and dialogs.
    5. Combine what has been learned in this course with what has been learned in the Elementary French courses to develop a more distinguished way of speaking.
    6. Communicate at an intermediate level in French.
    7. Use a high intermediate to advanced level vocabulary in and out of the classroom.
    8. Identify phonological and syntactical differences between French and English grammar with ease.
    9. Compare and contrast cultural differences among French speaking countries and the United States.

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/19/2010


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Geography

  
  • GEO 101 - World Geography


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a survey of the earth’s surface, its geophysical features and its economic importance. Climate, soil, natural resources and transportation are studied as they affect economic, political and cultural development.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the interaction between humans and their physical environment.
    2. Distinguish between developed and developing geographic regions.
    3. Identify the impact and role of climate, soil and natural resources.
    4. Analyze the impact of geophysical features on transportation.
    5. Analyze the physical and environmental landscape.
    6. Identify the impact of geophysical features on economic, political and cultural development.
    7. Evaluate the economic importance of the earth’s geophysical features.
    Listed Topics
    1. Developed versus developing regions
    2. Geophysical features
    3. Climate, soil and natural resources
    4. Geophysical impact on transportation, economic, political and cultural development
    5. Physical and human landscape
    6. Humans and their physical environment
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, scholarly readings, films, maps and electronic resources as assigned.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


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  • GEO 103 - Geography of U.S. and Canada


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of the United States and Canada, emphasizing cultural development and physical environment. Also studied are the relationships of the two countries to the rest of the world.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the principles and basic concepts of geography and the value of deeper study of such factors.
    2. Evaluate the way geographers approach current U.S. and Canadian issues.
    3. Identify the major economic, political, demographic, and environmental problems of the United States and Canada.
    4. Analyze the relevance of U.S. and Canada’s geography to world history.
    5. Apply cartography skills to understand the relationship between place location and map location.
    6. Identify different types of maps and explain their meaning and relationship.
    7. Evaluate how cultures interact within and across geographical regions.
    8. Analyze the interaction between humans, culture, location and environment.
    9. Identify the impact of technological advances on humanity and environment.
    10. Explain how a geographical region changes over time.
    Listed Topics
    1. Principles of geography
    2. Economic, political, demographic and environmental problems
    3. Regional and global geography
    4. Interactions between humans, culture, location and environment
    5. Technology, environment and humanity
    6. Humans and their physical environment
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook, internet
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/16/2011


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Geology

  
  • GGY 201 - Introduction to Geology


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This is a course for both science and non-science majors. The aspects of physical and historical geology discussed include but are not limited to volcanism, glaciation, stream development, rock formation, geological record and geological time.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply scientific inquiry to the discovery of geology.
    2. Describe the interior structure of the Earth.
    3. Distinguish types of rocks and soils on the Earth’s surface.
    4. Model geological landforms.
    5. Discuss transient geologic activities and their influence on the evolution of the Eart’s surface.
    6. Identify the local geology.
    7. Apply concepts learned in classroom by conducting laboratory experiments and field trips.
    Listed Topics
    1. Overview of the Fields of Geology
    2. Elements and Minerals
    3. Igneous, Metamorphic, and Sedimentary Rocks
    4. Weathering and Soil
    5. Mass Wasting
    6. Geologic Structures
    7. Folding, Faulting and Unconformities
    8. Earthquakes and the Earth’s Interior
    9. Sea Floor; Plate Tectonics
    10. Geology Time and the Earth’s Geological History
    11. Integrated Stratigraphic Interpretation
    12. Streams and Landscapes
    13. Ground Water
    14. Glaciation
    15. Desert and Wind Action
    16. Geographical Resources
    17. Beaches and Coastlines
    18. Local Geology
    19. Environmental Geological Concerns
    Reference Materials
    Textbook; Laboratory Handouts; Maps; Computer Simulations; Geological Field Work Equipment; Periodicals; Geological Materials and Activities from the Internet. Rock sample preparation equipment.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


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