Apr 14, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Physical Therapist Assistant

  
  • PTA 202 - Physical Therapy Professional Issues Seminar


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 102 , PTA 103 , PTA 112C  
    Co-requisites: PTA 201 , PTA 211C  

    Description
    This course is designed to provide the student with information concerning professional issues and concerns relevant to the practice of physical therapy. Emphasis will be placed on the organization of health care institutions and community health care agencies. Major concerns of the profession are presented and include ethics, licensure, malpractice, and continuing education. It also provides the student with knowledge and skills essential in performing departmental tasks such as budgets, third party reimbursement, and quality assurance. Areas covered in personnel and professional skills include time management, job interviewing, resume writing, effective communication, and problem solving styles. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Express (communicate) both verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, health care delivery personnel, and others in an effective and appropriate manner.
    2. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services.
    3. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the physical therapy profession.
    4. Demonstrate (exhibit) conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe.
    5. Demonstrate an awareness of social responsibility, citizenship, and advocacy, including participation in community service organizations and activities.
    6. Identify career development and lifelong learning opportunities.
    7. Recognize the role of the physical therapist assistant in the clinical education of physical therapist assistant students.
    Listed Topics
    1. Competency Examination
    2. Continuing Education
    3. Effective Communication
    4. Job Interviewing
    5. Licensure and Certification
    6. Malpractice Insurance
    7. Physical Therapy Note Writing
    8. Portfolio Preparation
    9. Poster Presentation
    10. Professional Ethics
    11. Resume Writing
    12. Solving Patient Problems
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. All textbooks for the PTA Program courses and reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


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  • PTA 203 - Specialty Topics in Physical Therapy


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 102 , PTA 103  and Basic Life Support (BLS)healthcare provider certification (American Heart Association or American Red Cross)
    Co-requisites: PTA 201 , PTA 202  and PTA 211C  

    Description
    This course is designed to explore contemporary physical therapy topics and physical therapy practice settings. The course emphasis is placed on enhancing the Physical Therapist Assistant student’s knowledge and skills in the prevention and treatment of injuries and conditions encountered in various physical therapy practice settings. Students receive training in the cognitive and skills evaluations required for Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) delivery and First Aid. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Exercise conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services.
    2. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy.
    3. Employ conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe.
    4. Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care including measures vital signs, height, weight, length and girth.
    5. Take appropriate action in an emergency situation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic Life Support (AED/CPR)
    2. Emergency management/first aid
    3. Health & wellness
    4. Injury prevention
    5. Physical therapy specialty topics
    6. Physical therapy specialty treatment settings
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources from previous PTA courses and additional reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


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  • PTA 211C - Physical Therapy Clinical Education 1


    Credits: 2
    80 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 102 , PTA 103 , PTA 112C  
    Co-requisites: PTA 201 , PTA 202  and PTA 203  

    Description
    This course provides the student with experiences to apply, integrate and perform learned clinical skills on patients under the supervision of a licensed Physical Therapist in a physical therapy clinical environment. The lecture portion of this course includes content designed to prepare the student to meet performance expectations and develop competency in the provision of selected components of intervention and in components of data collection techniques as directed in the plan of care developed by the Physical Therapist. The clinical portion of this course provides the student with an opportunity to participate in physical therapist directed activities commensurate with education level and experience. The faculty makes clinical education assignments, and students are responsible for their own transportation, parking and meals. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    The clinical education component of the comprehensive curriculum includes organized and sequential experiences coordinated with the didactic component of the curriculum. (Clinical education includes integrated experiences and full-time terminal experiences.) (3.3.3.1.) Clinical experiences selected by the program will provide students with appropriate role modeling and an opportunity to interact with individuals with impairments common to the clinical setting. (3.3.3.2.)

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Communicate verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, healthcare delivery personnel and others in an effective, appropriate and capable manner. (3.3.2.1.)
    2. Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services. (3.3.2.2.)
    3. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services. (3.3.2.3.)
    4. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy. (3.3.2.4.)
    5. Exhibit conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe. (3.3.2.5.)
    6. Communicate an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes. (3.3.2.6.)
    7. Report any changes in the patient’s status to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.11.)
    8. Provide patient-related instruction to patients, family members and caregivers to achieve patient outcomes based on the plan of care established by the physical therapist. (3.3.2.14.)
    9. Take appropriate action in an emergency situation. (3.3.2.15.)
    10. Complete thorough, accurate, logical, concise, timely and legible documentation that follows guidelines and specific documentation formats required by state practice acts, the practice setting and other regulatory agencies. (3.3.2.16.)
    11. Participate in discharge planning and follow up as directed by the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.17.)
    12. Read and understand the health care literature. (3.3.2.18.)
    13. Instruct other members of the health care team under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist using established techniques, programs and instructional materials commensurate with the learning characteristics of the audience. (3.3.2.19.)
    14. Educate others about the role of the physical therapist assistant. (3.3.2.20.)
    15. Interact with other members of the health care team in patient-care and non-patient care activities. (3.3.2.21.)
    16. Provide accurate and timely information for billing and reimbursement purposes. (3.3.2.22.)
    17. Describe aspects of organizational planning and operation of the physical therapy service. (3.3.2.23.)
    18. Participate in performance improvement activities (quality assurance). (3.3.2.24.)
    19. Demonstrate a commitment to meeting the needs of the patients and consumers. (3.3.2.25.)
    20. Recognize the role of the physical therapist assistant in the clinical education of physical therapist assistant students. (3.3.2.28.)
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient chart review
    2. Patient note writing
    3. Demonstration of appropriate student generic abilities
    4. Patient and healthcare personnel interaction
    5. Implementation of physical therapy treatment plan as appropriate in each setting and commensurate with student’s didactic training
    6. Participate in clinic specific opportunities and activities
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory committee. All textbooks for the (PTA) program courses and references materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2015


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  • PTA 212C - Physical Therapy Clinical Education 2


    Credits: 5
    300 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of all academic and prior clinical requirements.

     
    Description
    This clinical course is a full-time clinical education experience in an acute care setting, eight weeks in length and supervised by a licensed Physical Therapist. Clinical Education 2 provides in-depth experience in and responsibility for delivery of physical therapy services to a diverse client population. The faculty makes clinical education assignments, and students are responsible for their own transportation, parking and meals. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    The clinical education component of the comprehensive curriculum includes organized and sequential experiences coordinated with the didactic component of the curriculum. (Clinical education includes integrated experiences and full-time terminal experiences.) (3.3.3.1.) Clinical experiences selected by the program will provide students with appropriate role modeling and an opportunity to interact with individuals with impairments common to the clinical setting. (3.3.3.2.)

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Communicate verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, healthcare delivery personnel and others in an effective, appropriate and capable manner. (3.3.2.1.)
    2. Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services. (3.3.2.2.)
    3. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services. (3.3.2.3.)
    4. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy. (3.3.2.4.)
    5. Exhibit conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe. (3.3.2.5.)
    6. Communicate an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes. (3.3.2.6.)
    7. Demonstrate competency in performing components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care. (3.3.2.8.)
    8. Adjust interventions within the plan of care established by the physical therapist in response to patient clinical indications and reports this to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.9.)
    9. Recognize when intervention should not be provided due to changes in the patient’s status and reports this to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.10.)
    10. Report any changes in the patient’s status to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.11.)
    11. Recognize when the direction to perform an intervention is beyond that which is appropriate for a physical therapist assistant and initiates clarification with the physical therapist. (3.3.2.12.) 
    12. Participate in educating patients and caregivers as directed by the supervising physical therapist (3.3.2.13.)
    13. Provide patient-related instruction to patients, family members and caregivers to achieve patient outcomes based on the plan of care established by the physical therapist. (3.3.2.14.)
    14. Take appropriate action in an emergency situation. (3.3.2.15.)
    15. Complete thorough, accurate, logical, concise, timely and legible documentation that follows guidelines and specific documentation formats required by state practice acts, the practice setting and other regulatory agencies. (3.3.2.16.)
    16. Participate in discharge planning and follow up as directed by the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.17.)
    17. Read and understand the health care literature. (3.3.2.18.)
    18. Instruct other members of the health care team under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist using established techniques, programs and instructional materials commensurate with the learning characteristics of the audience. (3.3.2.19.)  
    19. Educate others about the role of the physical therapist assistant. (3.3.2.20.)
    20. Interact with other members of the health care team in patient-care and non-patient care activities. (3.3.2.21.)
    21. Provide accurate and timely information for billing and reimbursement purposes. (3.3.2.22.)
    22. Describe aspects of organizational planning and operation of the physical therapy service. (3.3.2.23.)
    23. Participate in performance improvement activities (quality assurance). (3.3.2.24.)
    24. Demonstrate a commitment to meeting the needs of the patients and consumers. (3.3.2.25.)
    25. Recognize the role of the physical therapist assistant in the clinical education of physical therapist assistant students. (3.3.2.28.)
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient chart review
    2. Patient note writing
    3. Demonstration of appropriate student generic abilities
    4. Patient and healthcare personnel interaction
    5. Implementation of physical therapy treatment plan as appropriate in each setting and commensurate with student’s didactic training
    6. Participate in clinic specific opportunities and activities
    Reference Materials
    PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT CLINICAL EDUCATION MANUAL
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory committee. All textbooks for the (PTA) program courses and references materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PTA 213C - Physical Therapy Clinical Education 3


    Credits: 5
    300 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of all academic and prior clinical requirements. PTA 212C  

     
    Description
    This clinical course is a full-time clinical education experience in a specialized clinical settings, eight weeks in length and supervised by a licensed Physical Therapist. Clinical Education 3 provides in-depth experience in and responsibility for delivery of physical therapy services to a specific client population, providing the student with an opportunnity to explore an area of interest. The faculty makes clinical eduction assignments which are subject to availability. Students are responsible for their own transportation, parking and meals. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    The clinical education component of the comprehensive curriculum includes organized and sequential experiences coordinated with the didactic component of the curriculum. (Clinical education includes integrated experiences and full-time terminal experiences.) (3.3.3.1.) Clinical experiences selected by the program will provide students with appropriate role modeling and an opportunity to interact with individuals with impairments common to the clinical setting. (3.3.3.2.)

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Communicate verbally and non-verbally with the patient, the physical therapist, healthcare delivery personnel, and others in an effective, appropriate and capable manner. (3.3.2.1.)
    2. Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services. (3.3.2.2.)
    3. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of society receiving health care services. (3.3.2.3.)
    4. Exhibit conduct that reflects a commitment to meet the expectations of members of the profession of physical therapy. (3.3.2.4.)
    5. Exhibit conduct that reflects practice standards that are legal, ethical and safe. (3.3.2.5.)
    6. Communicate an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes. (3.3.2.6.)
    7. Demonstrate competency in performing components of data collection essential for carrying out the plan of care. (3.3.2.8.)
    8. Adjust interventions within the plan of care established by the physical therapist in response to patient clinical indications and reports this to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.9.)
    9. Recognize when intervention should not be provided due to changes in the patient’s status and reports this to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.10.)
    10. Report any changes in the patient’s status to the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.11.)
    11. Recognize when the direction to perform an intervention is beyond that which is appropriate for a physical therapist assistant and initiates clarification with the physical therapist. (3.3.2.12.)
    12. Participate in educating patients and caregivers as directed by the supervising physical therapist (3.3.2.13.)
    13. Provide patient-related instruction to patients, family members and caregivers to achieve patient outcomes based on the plan of care established by the physical therapist. (3.3.2.14.)
    14. Take appropriate action in an emergency situation. (3.3.2.15.)
    15. Complete thorough, accurate, logical, concise, timely and legible documentation that follows guidelines and specific documentation formats required by state practice acts, the practice setting and other regulatory agencies. (3.3.2.16.)
    16. Participate in discharge planning and follow up as directed by the supervising physical therapist. (3.3.2.17.)
    17. Read and understand the health care literature. (3.3.2.18.)
    18. Instruct other members of the health care team under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist using established techniques, programs and instructional materials commensurate with the learning characteristics of the audience. (3.3.2.19.)
    19. Educate others about the role of the physical therapist assistant. (3.3.2.20.)
    20. Interact with other members of the health care team in patient-care and non-patient care activities. (3.3.2.21.)
    21. Provide accurate and timely information for billing and reimbursement purposes. (3.3.2.22.)
    22. Describe aspects of organizational planning and operation of the physical therapy service. (3.3.2.23.)
    23. Participate in performance improvement activities (quality assurance). (3.3.2.24.)
    24. Demonstrate a commitment to meeting the needs of the patients and consumers. (3.3.2.25.)
    25. Recognize the role of the physical therapist assistant in the clinical education of physical therapist assistant students. (3.3.2.28.)
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient chart review
    2. Patient note writing
    3. Demonstration of appropriate student generic abilities
    4. Patient and healthcare personnel interaction
    5. Implementation of physical therapy treatment plan as appropriate in each setting and commensurate with student’s didactic training
    6. Participate in clinic specific opportunities and activities
    Reference Materials
    PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT CLINICAL EDUCATION MANUAL
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory committee. All textbooks for the (PTA) program courses and references materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


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  • PTA 215 - Physical Therapy Professional Exploration


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PTA 201 , PTA 202 , PTA 203 , PTA 211C  
    Co-requisites: PTA 212C  and PTA 213C  

    Description
    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the opportunity to develop a project that will allow them to explore physical therapy specialty areas such as clinical practice, education, and research. This course will allow the students to plan and create their exploratory project and share their project with their peers. Examples of the exploratory project may be an in-service, presentation, written report, or electronic media such as a website. The topic for the project should be chosen in consultation with clinical and/or academic faculty. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use (utilize) reference resources such as journals and the internet for exploration topic research.
    2. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of exploration topic in the setting of an in-service, presentation, written report, or electronic media such as web page.
    3. Demonstrate higher order thinking skills such as ability to critique reference material and assimilation of information.
    4. Identify career development and lifelong learning opportunities.
    5. Recognize the role of the physical therapist assistant in the clinical education of physical therapist assistant students.
    6. Under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist, the student upon completion of the instruction presented within this course will be able to apply (implement) selected components of the interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist.
    7. Under the direction and supervision of the physical therapist, the student upon completion of the instruction presented within this course will be able to describe (communicate) an understanding of the plan of care developed by the physical therapist to achieve short and long term goals and intended outcomes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Electronic Media/Website
    2. Exploratory Project
    3. In-Service
    4. Presentation
    5. PTA Certification Examination Target Date
    6. PTA Registration Examination Application
    7. PTA Study Timeline
    8. Written Report
    Reference Materials
    PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT CLINICAL EDUCATION MANUAL
    Textbooks and resources are evaluated each year by program faculty and the Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. All textbooks for the PTA Program courses and reference materials will be utilized.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/27/2009


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Physics

  
  • PHY 100 - Basic Physics


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 090  

     
    Description
    This is a course for students with little or no high school preparation in physics. Students in programs that require college-level Physics should take this course first if they have no previous physics courses. Topics include methods of measurement, problem-solving techniques and the physical concepts of motion, forces, work and energy, electricity, waves and optics.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify elementary physical situations.
    2. Use algebra in solving basic physics problems.
    3. Distinguish between elementary physics situations that require a mathematical interpretation from those that do not.
    4. Explain physics phenomena.
    5. Apply theoretical concepts of physics in the conduction of laboratory experiments and participation in field trips.
    Listed Topics
    1. Units of Measurement
    2. Kinematics, Dynamic, and the Laws of Motion
    3. Work, Energy and Conservation of Energy
    4. Momentum and Collisions
    5. Rotational Motion
    6. Temperature, Heat and Thermodynamics
    7. Electricity and Magnetism
    8. Waves: Mechanical and Sound
    9. Light and Optics
    10. Atomic and Nuclear Physics
    Reference Materials
    Textbook; Laboratory Manual; Scientific Calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


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  • PHY 113 - Technical Physics 1


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 114  

     
    Description
    This is a course for students majoring in the engineering technologies. Physical concepts are developed through applications of mechanics and fluid dynamics. Everyday applications are examined in the laboratory.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define vocabulary terms related to the description of physical quantities and the laws and principles of physics.
    2. Apply the laws and principles of physics to problem-solving related to engineering technologies utilizing algebra and trigonometry.
    3. Explain observed physical phenomena.
    4. Identify the limitations of mathematical models for predicting outcomes for physical processes.
    5. Complete laboratory experiments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Measurements
    2. Vectors
    3. Linear and rotational motion
    4. Force and Newton’s Laws
    5. Resistance and pressure
    6. Force transformers
    7. Work, power and energy
    8. Energy convertors
    9. Momentum
    10. Hydrostatics and hydrodynamics
    11. Mechanical systems
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, laboratory manual, computers, scientific calculator or other materials deemed appropriate by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/23/2020


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  • PHY 114 - Technical Physics 2


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 113  

     
    Description
    This course is designed for students majoring in the engineering technologies. Physical concepts are developed through applications of thermodynamics, electricty, optics and radiation. Everyday applications are examined in the laboratory.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define vocabulary terms related to the description of physical quantities and the laws and principles of physics.
    2. Apply the laws and principles of physics to problem solving related to the engineering technologies utilizing algebra and trigonometry.
    3. Explain observed physical phenomena.
    4. Identify the limitations of mathematical models for predicting outcomes for physical processes.
    5. Evaluate physical systems in a laboratory setting.
    6. Analyze data measured in the laboratory.
    Listed Topics
    1. Heat and thermodynamics
    2. Heat engines and refrigeration systems
    3. Power and energy converters
    4. Vibration motion
    5. Electromagnetic radiation
    6. Sound systems
    7. Electrical systems: direct and alternating current
    8. Geometric optics and imaging 
    9. Atomic and nuclear systems
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, laboratory manual, computers, scientific calculator or other materials deemed appropriate by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/23/2020


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  • PHY 120 - Physics and Society, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 090  

     
    Description
    This course will explore the scientific method, the distinction between science and pseudoscience, energy, climate and sustainability and the interplay between scientific and social developments in basic physics.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate how the scientific method is applied.
    2. Note the difference between science and pseudoscience.
    3. Discuss the challenge of energy demand and sustainability.
    4. Explain the advantages and risks of nuclear energy and radiation.
    5. Review how historically and today science and society affect each other.
    Listed Topics
    1. The scientific method
    2. Science and pseudoscience
    3. Energy
    4. Entropy
    5. Electricity magnetism and light
    6. Climate
    7. Water management
    8. Nuclear energy: its advantages and dangers
    9. Radiation
    10. Resource management
    11. Space travel
    Reference Materials
    Recommended text (any edition) and web


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  • PHY 123 - Physics for the Health Sciences/Respiratory Therapy


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: MAT 108  

    Description
    This is a course that examines those laws and principles of physics dealing with motion, forces, fluids and electricity/magnetism that have relevance to respiratory therapy and other health-science professions. Major topics of study include: measurement units, conversions and experimental errors, forces, Newton’s laws of motion, the characteristics of liquids and gases, the flow of fluids under various conditions, the effects of heat and temperature on gases and liquids and the basics of electricity and magnetism.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List the fundamental laws of physics that pertain to motion, force, work, energy, heat, electricity and magnetism.
    2. Explain how the fundamental laws apply to the function of the heart, lungs, circulatory system and the operation of respiratory therapy equipment.
    3. Use algebra to solve problems dealing with kinematics, dynamics, pressure/flow, heat/temperature and electricity/magnetism.
    4. Use specialized laboratory equipment such as viscometers and ammeters to investigate the behavior of fluids, electricity, etc.
    Listed Topics
    1. Measurements: Units, Conversions and Errors
    2. Kinematics
    3. Forces and Newton’s Laws of Motion
    4. Work, Energy and Conservation of Energy
    5. Properties of Liquids and Gases
    6. Principles of Fluid Flow
    7. Thermodynamics of Gases and Liquids
    8. Electricity, Magnetism and Electrical Safety
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, laboratory manual, scientific pocket calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


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  • PHY 125 - Applied Nuclear Physics


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: MAT 108  

    Description
    This course is for students in nuclear medicine technology or radiation therapy technology. Basic principles of physics used in radiation therapy and radioisotope diagnosis are studied. Topics include the atoms and nuclides, radiation counting and detection, radioactive decay, laws and modes of decay, half-life, properties of alpha, beta and gamma radiation and its production. The laboratory component introduces data reduction procedures and reinforces concepts presented in lecture.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the basic physical principles as they apply to nuclear medicine and radiation therapy.
    2. Differentiate between those physical situations that require a mathematical interpretation from those that do not.
    3. Solve routine problems in the radiological fields of nuclear medicine and radiation therapy utilizing algebra.
    4. Apply theoretical concepts learned in the course that emphasize elementary data reduction techniques commonly used in the radiological fields in the conduction of laboratory experiments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Measurements
    2. Motion
    3. Forces in nature
    4. Energy and the conservation of energy
    5. Electrostatics and electricity
    6. Wave theory
    7. Electromagnetic radiation
    8. Atomic structure
    9. Atomic spectra
    10. Mass and energy interchange
    11. Characteristics of atomic nuclei
    12. Conditions for nuclear stability
    13. Decay law, half-life and statistics
    14. Activity and average life
    15. Biological and physical half-life
    16. Chart of the nuclides
    17. Radioactive processes
    18. Nuclear transmutation equations and the production of secondary radiations: X-ray, Auger and conversion electrons
    Reference Materials
    Laboratory manual, chart of the nuclides, table of the nuclides, handouts, calculators, scientific calculator and other materials as deemed appropriate by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/23/2020


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  • PHY 126 - Radiation Physics and Protection


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 125   

     
    Description
    This course is for students in nuclear medicine technology or radiation therapy technology. The interaction of radiation with matter and radiation protection philosophies and concepts are discussed. Topics include radiation interaction with matter, shielding of radioactivity, nuclear detection devices, dosimetry and radiation exposure. Emphasized are the safe use of radioactive sources, accelerators, X-ray machines and radionuclides. The laboratory component introduces data reduction procedures and reinforces concepts presented in lecture.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe physical situations as they apply to radiation therapy and nuclear medicine.
    2. Solve routine problems in the radiological fields of nuclear medicine and radiation therapy utilizing algebra.
    3. Differentiate between those physical situations that require a mathematical interpretation from those that do not.
    4. Explain NRC regulations in the safe handling and monitoring of radioactive materials.
    5. Apply theoretical concepts learned in the course which emphasize elementary data reduction techniques commonly used in the radiological fields in the conduction of laboratory experiments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sources of radiation: radioactive material and machine-produced radiation
    2. Types of radiation: directly and indirectly ionizing radiation
    3. Intensity and the inverse square law
    4. Linear energy transfer, range and specific ionization
    5. Mechanisms for the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter
    6. Attenuation law
    7. Basic means of protection from directly and indirectly ionizing radiation
    8. Units of dosimetry and radiation exposure
    9. Principles of radiation protection
    10. Federal and state regulatory agencies
    11. Permissible dosages and exposure limits
    12. Detection technology
    13. Imaging systems and nuclear medicine
    14. Future of radiation detection
    Reference Materials
    Laboratory manual, chart of the nuclides, table of the nuclides, handouts, calculators, scientific calculator and other materials as deemed appropriate by instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/23/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 127 - Physics for Health Science/Ultrasonography


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 100  or equivalent and acceptance into the DMS program

     
    Description
    This is a course in the physics of ultrasound for the student of diagnostic medical sonography. Included is the physics necessary to understand the operation of ultrasound instrumentation.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the physics of waves as applied to diagnostic medical sonography.
    2. Outline the theory of operation of the basic components of generic instrumentation used in diagnostics medical sonography.
    3. Describe the artifacts and the limitations encountered in ultrasound imaging.
    4. Solve problems related to the physics portion of the DMS Registration exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Physical characteristics of Ultrasound Waves
    2. The Pulse-Echo Concept
    3. Transducers
    4. Focusing and scanning
    5. Instrumentation
    6. Doppler Principle
    7. Performance and safety
    Reference Materials
    Textbook; Scientific Calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 128 - Physics for Health Science/Radiography


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 100  or equivalent and acceptance into the Radiologic Technology Program

     
    Description
    This course explores the physics of X-rays and radiography. Students gain a quantitative and qualitative understanding of the physical principles describing the nature of X-rays, the production and characterization of radiation and how X-rays interact with matter.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the basic physical principles behind X-ray production and imaging.
    2. Explain the nature and production of X-rays and how X-rays interact with matter.
    3. Explain the theory of operations of basic X-ray imaging systems and various imaging modalities employing X-rays.
    4. Predict the impact of physics factors which will affect the X-ray image.
    5. Solve problems of the physics portion of the Radiologic Technologist Registration exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Atomic structure
    2. The electromagnetic spectrum
    3. Basic electrical circuitry of X-ray imaging systems
    4. High voltage generation and rectification
    5. The X-ray tube and thermionic emission
    6. X-ray beam quantity and quality
    7. Factors affecting the X-ray image
    8. Imaging techniques
    Reference Materials
    Textbook; Scientific Calculator, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 141 - Physics 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 108  

     
    Description
    This physics course is taught at the algebraic level. The students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics using algebra and trigonometry. Laboratory activities in the course reinforce the fundamental principles of physics and topics presented in the lecture section. The course is transferable to many four-year institutions. Students should consult a transfer counselor.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the forces that affect observed motions of nature.
    2. Describe the conservation laws as they apply to mechanics.
    3. Solve physics problems using algebra and trigonometry.
    4. Apply data analysis techniques in laboratory experiments.
    5. Draw conclusions relating experiment results to appropriate lecture topics.
    6. Communicate experimental findings both in written form and graphical form through laboratory reports.
    Listed Topics
    1. Measurements
    2. Vectors
    3. One and two dimensional kinematics
    4. Newton’s Laws of motion
    5. Uniform circular motion and gravitation
    6. Work, energy and conservation of mechanical energy
    7. Linear momentum and collisions
    8. Rotational kinematics and rotational dynamics
    9. Vibrations and simple harmonic motion
    10. Temperature, heat and thermodynamics
    11. Kinetic theory of gases
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Laboratory Manual, Scientific Calculator, Computer, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 05/17/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 142 - Physics 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 141  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of PHY 141 . Students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental principles and applications of electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics using algebra and trigonometry. Laboratory activities reinforce the fundamental principles of physics and topics presented in the lecture section. This course is transferable to many four-year institutions. Students should consult a transfer counselor.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify physical situations relating to the concepts of electricity, magnetism, optics, atomic and nuclear physics.
    2. Solve physics problems using algebra and trigonometry.
    3. Apply knowledge of vectors to problems of electricity and magnetism.
    4. Apply data analysis techniques in laboratory experiments.
    5. Draw conclusions relating experiment results to appropriate lecture topics.
    6. Communicate experimental findings both in written and graphical form through laboratory reports.

     Listed Topics

    1. Static electric forces
    2. Electric potential
    3. Capacitance, resistance, basic circuits
    4. Magnetism and induction
    5. Wave motion and sound
    6. Nature of light
    7. Geometric optics and physical optics
    8. Special relativity
    9. Atomic and nuclear physics
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Laboratory Manual, Scientific Calculator, Computer, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 221 - Physics for Science and Engineering 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 141  or equivalent high school course complete within the past 5 years
    Co-requisites: MAT 201  

    Description
    This is a calculus-based mechanics physics course that emphasizes problem-solving techniques. Major topics of study include: vectors, one and two dimensional kinematics, circular motion, forces and Newton’s laws, work, energy and its conservation, collisions, linear momentum and its conservation, rotational kinematics and dynamics, angular momentum and its conservation, static equilibrium, simple harmonic motion and gravity.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the fundamental laws and principles that form the basis of the physics in mechanics.
    2. Apply calculus to describe motion and other mechanical situations where algebra is inadequate.
    3. Synthesize various concepts while applying them to real-world contexts seen in careers in the fields of science, technology and engineering.
    4. Apply data reduction/analysis techniques used in the execution of laboratory experiments to test important concepts, theories and principles of physics.
    5. Communicate ideas effectively in graphical and written form in homework solutions, examinations and lab reports. 
    Listed Topics
    1. Vector algebra with applications in physics
    2. One and two dimensional kinematics
    3. Forces and Newton’s Laws of motion
    4. Work, energy and conservation of energy
    5. Collisions, linear momentum and conservation of linear momentum
    6. Circular motion
    7. Rotational kinematics and dynamics
    8. Angular momentum and conservation of angular momentum
    9. Static equilibrium and elasticity
    10. Oscillatory (Simple Harmonic) Motion
    11. Newton’s Law of gravitation
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, scientific pocket calculator, computer, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 222 - Physics for Science and Engineering 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 221  
    Co-requisites: MAT 202  

    Description
    This calculus-based physics course stresses experimental and problem-solving techniques. Electricity and magnetism are studied. Topics include electric charge and Coulomb’s Law, electric fields, Gauss’ Law, capacitors and dielectrics, Kirchhoff’s Rules, DC circuits, Oersted Effect, Ampere’s law, Maxwell’s equations and AC circuits.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the fundamental laws and principles that form the basis of the physics in electricity and magnetism.
    2. Apply calculus in problem solving to develop relationships for interpretation and attain numerical solutions where algebra is inadequate.
    3. Synthesize various concepts while applying them to real-world contexts seen in careers in the fields of science, technology and engineering.
    4. Apply data reduction/analysis techniques used in the execution of laboratory experiments to test important concepts, theories and principles of physics.
    5. Communicate ideas effectively in graphical and written form in homework solutions, examinations and lab reports. 
    Listed Topics
    1. Electric charge and Coulombs Law
    2. Electric fields
    3. Gauss’s Law
    4. Electric potential
    5. Capacitance and dielectrics
    6. Direct Current and resistance
    7. Magnetic fields and magnetic forces
    8. Sources of magnetic fields
    9. Eletromagnetic induction
    10. Inductance
    11. Maxwell’s equations
    12. Alternating current
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Scientific Calculator, Computer, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 223 - Physics for Science and Engineering 3


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PHY 221  

     
    Description
    This calculus-based physics course stresses experimental and problem-solving techniques. Heat, thermodynamics, waves, geometrical and physical optics and atomic structure are studied. Topics include temperature, thermal expansion of solids, ideal gases, kinetic theory, heat transfer and calorimetry, the first and second law of thermodynamics, transverse and longitudinal wave motion, superposition of waves, synthesis of complex wave forms, electromagnetic radiation, law of reflection, law of refraction, imaging, interference, diffraction and polarization.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the fundamental laws and principles that form the basis of thermodynamics, wave theory, light and optics.
    2. Apply calculus in problem solving to develop relationships for interpretation and attain numerical solutions where algebra is inadequate.
    3. Synthesize various concepts while applying them to real-world contexts seen in careers in the fields of science, technology and engineering.
    4. Apply data reduction/analysis techniques used in the execution of laboratory experiments to test important concepts, theories and principles of physics.
    5. Communicate ideas effectively in graphical and written form in homework solutions, examinations and lab reports. 
    Listed Topics
    1. Temperature, thermal expansion and ideal gases
    2. Heat and the first Law of Thermodynamics
    3. Kinetic theory of gases
    4. Heat engines, entropy and second Law of Thermodynamics
    5. Mechanical wave motion
    6. Sound waves
    7. Superposition of waves and standing waves
    8. Electromagnetic waves
    9. Laws of Geometric Optics, Laws of Physical Optics
    10. Diffraction and polarization
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, scientific calculator, computers, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PHY 224 - Modern Physics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites:  PHY 222 PHY 223  

     
    Description
    This course in modern physics deals with relativity, quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Major topics of study include: Special relativity, the radiation laws, matter waves, atomic structure, Schrodinger’s equation in one dimension, tunneling, electron spin, multi-electron atoms and the periodic table and nuclear physics.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the fundamental laws and principles that form the basis of relativity, quantum mechanics and atomic structure.
    2. Apply calculus in problem solving to develop relationships for interpretation and attain numerical solutions where algebra is inadequate.
    3. Synthesize various concepts while applying them to real-world contexts seen in careers in the fields of science, technology and engineering.
    4. Apply data reduction/analysis techniques to test important concepts, theories and principles of physics.
    5. Communicate ideas effectively in graphical and written form in homework solutions and examinations. 
    Listed Topics
    1. Special relativity
    2. Quantum theory of light
    3. Particle nature of matter
    4. Matter waves
    5. Quantum mechanics in one dimension
    6. Tunneling phenomena
    7. Atomic structure
    8. Electron spin
    9. Multi-electron atoms and the periodic table
    10. Nuclear physics
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Scientific Calculator; Computers, Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search



Plumbing Technology

  
  • PLT 100 - Introduction to the Plumbing Profession


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the plumbing trade and teaches basic plumbing skills. Students will recognize the opportunities and commitments involved in a plumbing career.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the basic principles of plumbing.
    2. Recognize the responsibilities of ensuring a safe, potable water supply.
    3. Describe the types of work involved in plumbing.
    4. Explain the purpose of plumbing codes and licensing.
    5. Describe the requirements for licensing and certification as journeyman and as master plumber.
    6. Summarize employment opportunities involved in a plumbing career.
    Listed Topics
    1. Overview of plumbing principles
    2. Ensuring the health, safety and comfort of society
    3. History and types of work involved in plumbing
    4. Overview of plumbing codes and licensing
    5. Requirements for licensing and master plumber certification
    6. Plumbing career opportunities
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved plumbing textbooks, workbook and handouts
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 101 - Plumbing Skills 1


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 100  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to residential plumbing tools, materials and fittings in both a classroom and laboratory setting. Students will learn safe usage of power tools to perform basic plumbing tasks. Conservation methods will be introduced which promote a green environment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize and practice safe use of power tools.
    2. Describe types of pipes and identify their purpose.
    3. Identify and describe common types of fittings used in residential plumbing.
    4. Purchase fittings based on requirements, size and material.
    5. Identify and explain valves and devices used in residential plumbing.
    6. Define safety devices and explain their purpose in residential plumbing.
    7. Recognize conservation methods which promote a green environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Power tools
    2. Types of pipes
    3. Types of fittings
    4. Fitting specifications
    5. Valves and devises
    6. Reactionary valves and devices
    7. Green conservation
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved plumbing textbooks, workbook and handouts
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 102 - Plumbing Measuring and Calculating


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides students with opportunities to learn, apply and practice measuring and calculating skills as they apply to plumbing materials and methods.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Calculate pipe length, shape and clearances.
    2. Transfer calculations to plumbing material using a rule.
    3. Calculate and measure volumes, pressures and capacities.
    4. Differentiate specifications on manufacture data sheets.
    5. Define offset, diagonal, rise and run.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pipe length calculations
    2. Applying plumbing calculations
    3. Volume, pressure and capacity
    4. Manufacture specifications
    5. Sizing pipe for assembly
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved plumbing textbooks, workbook and handouts
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/19/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 103 - Plumbing 1


    Credits: 2
    1 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to provide beginning plumbing students with a fundamental knowledge of the use and care of tools necessary for the performance of trade responsibility. Special emphasis is given to the proper procedures employed in producing a safe and healthy work environment. Laboratory sessions in soldering and brazing are conducted.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Select proper tools for the job in a safe manner.
    2. Identify hazards to safety and health on the job.
    3. Solder and braze joints in pipe, according to standards.
    4. Apply OSHA laws and practices as they relate to plumbing safety and health.
    5. Describe safe conditions and procedures.
    6. Recognize conservation methods which promote a green environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. OSHA laws and practices
    3. Hazardous conditions
    4. Plumbing tools
    5. Brazing
    6. Conservation methods
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 105 - Introduction to Plumbing Code


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 103  

     
    Description
    This course describes drainage and distribution systems designed and built for state, county and local codes and regulations. Emphasis is placed on water supply, drainage using Article XV of the current plumbing code and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply drainage and venting principles.
    2. Utilize rules and regulations Article XV of the plumbing code.
    3. Describe water general terminology with reference to water distribution, valves, sizing of water supply lines and green materials.
    4. Name water treatment principles.
    5. Vent drainage and distribution systems.
    6. Apply safety standards to venting.
    Listed Topics
    1. State, county and local plumbing codes
    2. Water distribution and drainage principles
    3. Sizing and selection of lines and valves within distribution systems
    4. Water treatment principles
    5. Venting of drainage and distribution systems
    6. LEED concepts
    7. Safety
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 106 - Plumbing Blueprint Reading


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 100  

     
    Description
    Students will learn to interpret and communicate plumbing designs on construction blueprints. Topics include sketching, abbreviations, symbols and illustrated views of piping systems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Translate basic plumbing symbols and abbreviations.
    2. Interpet basic residential architectural blueprints.
    3. Illustrate simple sketches of piping systems.
    4. Distinguish different illustrated views of a piping system.
    5. Recognize basic drafting tools and techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Plumbing symbols and abbreviations
    2. Architectural blueprints and symbols
    3. Piping diagrams
    4. Architectural layout and design
    5. Design tools and techniques
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved plumbing textbooks, workbook and handouts.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/19/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 115 - Mathematics for Plumbing 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides the foundations of mathematics applied to the plumbing trade. Students will review computational skills and the application of analytical solutions to problems. Additionally, a presentation of practical geometry dealing with pipe measurements, volumes and capacities of contained fluids and problems related to hydraulics and pneumatics will be provided.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Solve pipe length calculations.
    2. Differentiate builder’s levels.
    3. Recognize various volumes and pressures.
    4. Discuss conservation and green environments in relation to volumes and pressures.
    5. Recognize angles in plumbing.
    6. Offset diagonal, rise and runs.
    7. Solve plumbing projects with 45 degree constraints.
    8. Utilize equal spacing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Length calculation
    2. Builder’s level
    3. Volumes
    4. Pressures
    5. Capacities
    6. Job applictions
    7. Angles in plumbing
    8. Diagonals, rise and runs
    9. Equal spacing
    10. Conservation
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 121 - Plumbing Drafting/Blueprint Reading 1


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course deals with the interpretation of technical drawings, isometric drawings and building plans. Students interpret three view, sectional, schematic, exploded and isometric drawings. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Interpret drawings in the three-view, sectional, schematic, exploded and isometric views.
    2. Recognize principles used in reading drawings and relate these drawings to job specifications.
    3. Recognize and apply isometric sketching.
    4. Discuss LEED concepts.
    5. Plan the installation of required plumbing.
    6. Recognize special problems in commercial plumbing installations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Blueprint reading
    2. Piping arrangements
    3. Sectional, schematic, exploded and isometric views
    4. Planning
    5. Commercial plumbing
    6. Applications
    7. LEED
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 145 - Plumbing Code 2


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will present the principles for supplying safe, potable water to residential, commercial and institutional buildings, according to local plumbing codes. The principles and code requirements for safe removal of sewage, waste and storm water will be covered with emphasis on the use of the code book, drawing interpretation and application. Green applications and practices will be described.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply the plumbing code as it applies to water supply and drainage systems.
    2. Install a safe, potable water supply and proper drainage systems according to code in a lab setting.
    3. Interpret plumbing code as it applies to residential, commercial and institutional building.
    4. Recognize code requirements for sewage, waste and storm water applications.
    5. Describe the differences and applications of various green materials and practices in the industry.
    Listed Topics
    1. Allegheny County Health Department Plumbing Code
    2. Water supply and drainage
    3. Safe potable water
    4. Storm water applications
    5. Drain pipes primer and fittings
    6. Approved supplies per code
    7. Water distribution pipes
    8. Green applications
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 201 - Plumbing Skills 2


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 101  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to residential plumbing fixtures, faucets, drain assemblies and appliances in both a classroom and laboratory setting. Students will study and practice safe application and installation of basic residential plumbing devices. Additional conservation materials and appliances will be discussed which promote a green environment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and install the basic types of residential fixtures.
    2. Recognize the sequence of installation during various phases of construction.
    3. Describe differences in basic residential faucet design, style and finish.
    4. Select and install basic residential drain assemblies.
    5. Explain the different types of residential water heating systems.
    6. Purchase basic residential plumbing fixtures, appliances and equipment.
    7. List conservation materials and appliances that promote a green environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Plumbing fixtures
    2. Installation of plumbing fixtures
    3. Residential faucets
    4. Residential drain assemblies
    5. Residential hot water systems
    6. Residential plumbing equipment and appliances
    7. Conservation and a green environment
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved plumbing textbooks, workbook and handouts.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 202 - Plumbing Skills 3


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 201  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to code requirements for sizing a drain waste and vent (DMV) system in a classroom and laboratory setting. Topics include residential venting types and DMV installation. Conservation materials and practices are introduced to promote a green environment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and describe segments of a drain, waste and vent (DWV) system.
    2. Relate how a basic residential septic system operates.
    3. Identify drain, waste and vent (DWV) code requirements for residential fixtures.
    4. Apply drain, waste and vent (DWV) code requirements during installation.
    5. Illustrate testing methods required to pass a plumbing inspection.
    6. Recognize the differences and application of various green materials and practices in the industry.
    Listed Topics
    1. Residential drain, waste and vent (DWV) systems
    2. Residential septic systems
    3. Residential code for drain, waste and vent (DWV) systems
    4. Drain, waste and vent (DWV) installation
    5. Drain, waste and vent (DWV) testing methods
    6. Conservation and a green environment
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 204 - Maintenance Plumbing


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course prepares students to recognize water supply, drain waste and vent problems. Diagnostic methods and repairs are practiced in a laboratory environment. Conservation fixtures and appliances are discussed and analyzed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize plumbing tools and discuss related safety practices.
    2. Compare and contrast replacement versus repair of leaky fixtures.
    3. Detect and repair drain restrictions.
    4. Analyze and service hot water systems.
    5. Test, adjust and maintain automated conservation fixtures.
    6. Apply conservation methods to promote a green environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Plumbing tools and safety
    2. Fixture repair and replacement
    3. Drain, waste and vent systems
    4. Hot water systems
    5. Conservation fixtures and appliances
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved plumbing textbooks, workbook and handouts.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 205 - Plumbing 4


    Credits: 6
    3 Lecture Hours 7 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 204  

     
    Description
    This course delineates the installation of plumbing fixtures and code requirements for gas supply systems. Additionally, students will discuss job preparation methods and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Install commonly used plumbing fixtures and appliances including LP gas and natural gas.
    2. Install a variety of gas systems in a laboratory setting.
    3. Professionally communicate to a culturally diverse customer base.
    4. Apply human relations techniques for optimal team projects and customer relations.
    5. Determine time and cost estimates for plumbing jobs.
    6. Apply work standards, preventative maintenance and production control standards.
    7. Recognize the latest materials and methods related to green technologies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. Plumbing fixtures
    3. Code requirements
    4. Gas supply systems
    5. Professional communication
    6. Customer relations
    7. Time and cost estimates
    8. Work standards and production control
    9. LEED materials and methods
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 206 - Plumbing Code 3


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 145  

     
    Description
    This course will prepare students for the code exam. Students will apply theory through hands-on activities and will review the concepts of Plumbing Code 1 and Plumbing Code 2. Conservation materials and methods will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Be prepared to sit for the code exam.
    2. Review all code regulations.
    3. Apply codes to residential and commercial codes.
    4. Review Article XV of the Allegheny County Health Department’s Rules and Regulations for Plumbing and Building Drainage.
    5. Apply code theory to practical projects.
    6. Describe the codes that apply to green technologies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Exam preparation
    2. Article XV
    3. Residential and commercial codes
    4. Practical projects
    5. Green technologies
    6. Test strategies
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 221 - Plumbing Drafting/Blueprint Reading 2


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours 1 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 121  

     
    Description
    This course will prepare apprentices to supervise complete plumbing installations using commercial plumbing drawings. Students will prepare all appropriate documentation for the installations. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) methods will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare for plumbing building permit application installations.
    2. Apply the inspection checklist to blueprint reading.
    3. Review provisions in the International Residential Code (IRC) and Article XV of Allegheny County code.
    4. Recognize implications of modification needs.
    5. Recognize legal points of disposal and the implications of sewage treatment in plumbing blueprints.
    6. Describe LEED methods and applications.
    Listed Topics
    1. Blueprint reading
    2. Fixtures, faucents and fittings
    3. General regulations
    4. Pipes and plumbing system components
    5. Showers and urinals
    6. Water supply and distribution
    7. Sanitary drainage
    8. Piping installations
    9. Traps, interceptors and separators
    10. LEED
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 222 - Mechanical CAD for Plumbers


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: PLT 221  

     
    Description
    This course will improve the apprentices ability to develop, modify and interpret plumbing system design drawings, layouts and coordination of drawings from other trades. Students will use Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) software and techniques. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) methods will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Layout basic system designs using CAD software.
    2. Apply the fundamental of CAD drafting in designs.
    3. Modify CAD drawings.
    4. Use menu commands to create and save simple drawings.
    5. Plot drawings.
    6. Print drawings.
    7. Discuss the implications of LEED methods.
    Listed Topics
    1. CAD
    2. Modifying and saving
    3. Menu commands
    4. Printing and plotting
    5. Job corrections
    6. LEED
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 224 - Estimating


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides instruction in estimating personal needs, unit costs, quantity and take-offs within the mechanical trade. Concepts of cost projection, analysis, concept estimating, direct and indirect costs and overhead are discussed. Additionally, refrigerant, recovery instruction and certification are addressed. Cost analysis of green materials and methods are also reviewed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Estimate procedures needed to make quantity surveys of material requirements for cost estimating.
    2. Plan estimate formats.
    3. Extract quantities from drawings.
    4. Prepare a complete bid.
    5. Recognize the cost differential when utilizing green materials and methods.
    6. Calculate specialty pricing.
    7. Create material take-offs in quantities of unit measurement.
    8. Apply safety procedures for refrigerant recovery.
    9. Calculate equipment pricing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Estimating
    2. Unit measurement
    3. Equipment and specialty pricing
    4. Site work and subcontracting
    5. Safe refrigerant recovery certificate
    6. Quality bids
    7. Green materials and methods
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PLT 225 - Medical Gas


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will prepare students to install medical gas systems in hospitals or other health-care related environments. Students will become certified in advanced methods of joining, piping and component usage within health care environments. Green materials and methods will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply medical gas codes.
    2. Execute installation requirements for medical gases.
    3. Store medical gases utilizing proper safety measures.
    4. Braze medical gas lines.
    5. Test medical installation system alarms.
    6. Identify mechanical components in medical gas installation.
    7. Discuss the utilization of green materials and methods.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. Storage
    3. Gas installation
    4. Brazing
    5. Gas codes
    6. Alarm and testing
    7. Mechanical components
    8. Green materials and methods
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Murphy, Michael Date Approved: 01/28/2014


    Course and Section Search



Political Science

  
  • POL 101 - Introduction to Political Science


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides student with a general introduction to politics and governance by studying the basic theories and terminology of Political Science. To this end, the semester is broken up into four distinct sections that correspond with four of the major sub-fields within the discipline. The areas of emphasis include political philosophy, comparative institutions, international relations, and American politics. While studying each sub-field, students will be asked to consider current political events. Students will recognize the importance of academic terms and concepts once they are observed against the backdrop of “real world” political events.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List differences between modern political ideologies.
    2. Assess specific political issues (e.g., poverty, free trade and discrimination) through the lens of different political ideologies.
    3. Compare the advantages and disadvantages between parliamentary and presidential democracy.
    4. Compare different forms of representation (proportional vs. single member districts).
    5. Compare and contrast Contending theories of International Relations.
    6. Explain the American Electoral College system and how it compares with how other electoral systems.
    7. Assess the arguments for why governments and politics are necessary.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Political Science
    2. Define Politics and Government
    3. Introduction to political ideologies
    4. Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism, Fascism
    5. The issue of world poverty as seen through different ideological lenses
    6. Parliamentary Democracy
    7. Presidential Democracy
    8. Proportional representation
    9. Single member districts
    10. Contending theoretical perspectives within International Relations
    11. Electoral Systems
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary text and appropriate AV materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 103 - American Government


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course investigates the development and evolution of the American political system. Students will be introduced to the unique structure, functions, and problems of the national government within the federal system. Close attention is given to the nature of and the controversies emerging from the interaction between political institutions. This includes analysis of the following concepts and topics: federalism, separation of power, check and balances, Bill of Rights, democracy, civil liberties, civil rights and political parties.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize major concepts associated with the U.S. American form of government.
    2. Explain the causes of the American Revolution and the meaning of the Declaration of Independence.
    3. Assess the purpose of political parties within the American political system.
    4. Comprehend different theories and models of democracy and their relationship to democracy in the United States.
    5. Recognize the roles and interaction of the three branches of government.
    6. Expound on the relationship between media and democratic governance.
    7. Compare and contrast the United States House of Representatives with the United States Senate.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Government
    2. Introduction to Democratic Theory
    3. The Congress
    4. The Presidency
    5. The Judiciary
    6. The Constitution
    7. Civil Liberties
    8. Civil Rights
    9. Political Parties
    10. The Media
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary text and appropriate AV materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 110 - State and Local Government


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on the structure, function and policies of state and local governments in the United States. Special attention is given to the origins and evolution of the American system of Federalism. The relationships among national, state and local governments in the area of education, welfare, criminal justice, economic development and environmental protection are also examined.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the origins and development of the American system of Federalism.
    2. Describe the different variables that influence policy making at the national, state and local level.
    3. Compare and contrast the structure and institutional arrangements of different state governments.
    4. Identify why policies differ between states.
    5. Identify the differences between unitary, confederation and federal systems.
    6. List the main arguments contained within Federalist #51.
    7. Compare and contrast the policy making environments of the national, state and local governments.
    8. Explain the constitutional division of power between national, state and local governments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Federalism
    2. State constitutions
    3. Parties and elections in states
    4. State legislatures
    5. State executives
    6. State courts
    7. Making state and local policy
    8. Financing state and local government
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 115 - The American Constitution


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course examines the United States Constitution, which is the world’s oldest written constitution. Born in the turbulent years following the Revolutionary War, it formalized many of the philosophical and political ideas of that period. The central values embodied in the Constitution reflect the Founders’ commitment to liberty and limited government. While the constitution has served the American republic well over the past 200-plus years, it has also generated a tremendous amount of controversy. From the very beginning, disputes over Constitutional interpretation have played a major role in shaping the American republic. In this course, we will study some of these major Constitutional disputes and gain a greater appreciation for the evolution of Constitutional Law since the founding period.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the nature and character of judicial decision of the Supreme Court on a range of important subjects (free speech, privacy, states’ rights).
    2. Compare and contrast modern Supreme Court decisions within the context of the broader historical traditions of Constitutional law.
    3. Aware of the basic philosophical values and traditions embedded within the Constitution.
    4. Identify the content of the different sections and articles of the Constitution.
    5. Describe the basic operation of the Supreme Court of the United States.
    6. Compare and contrast the Articles of Confederation with the United States Constitution.
    Listed Topics
    1. The Articles of Confederation and the Constitutional Convention of 1787
    2. Supreme Court decisions concerning the power of government and the jurisdiction between the various branches of government
    3. The Bill of Rights and the history of decisions the Court has made with respect to them: freedom of speech, the press, religion, due process in relation to criminal justice and economic regulation, equal protection and the question of race and gender and sexual orientation
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary text and appropriate AV materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 201 - Modern Political Thought


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an analysis of major Western political thinkers from the Renaissance to the present. The relationship of ideas to politics is emphasized but additional topics make this a history of modern ideas as well. Prominence is given to the major political thinkers from the following intellectual traditions: liberalism, communism, conservatism, fascism and democratic theory.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the writings of some of the major political theorists of the 20th century.
    2. Identify the continuities and cleavages within different political traditions.
    3. Compare and contrast how different theorists conceptualize basic political values like freedom, equality, democracy, etc..
    4. Assess contemporary politics through the lens of different political theorists and opposing political traditions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Political through from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (Machiavelli, Luther, Motesquieu, Voltaire, etc)
    2. Classical Liberalism (Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, etc)
    3. Neoclassical and Welfare Liberalism (Spencer, Green, etc)
    4. Conservatism (Burke, de Mastre, etc)
    5. Socialism and Communism: Up to Marx (More, Marx and Engles, etc)
    6. Socialism and Communism: after Marx (Bernstein, Lenin, Trotsky, etc)
    7. Fascism and Nazism (Gobineau, Hitler, etc)
    8. Recent developments (post-1960)
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary text and appropriate AV materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 204 - Comparative Politics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides theoretical and empirical tools to help students understand comparative politics. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Students will explore three different types of States: established democracies, developing democracies and non-democracies through country case studies from Americas, Africa, Middle-East, Europe and Asia. The comparative aspect of the course involves searching for similarities and differences among different case studies in order to formulate generalizations about politics.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define fundamental concepts in the field of comparative politics.
    2. Develop familiarity with the political systems of other countries.
    3. Apply political concepts to specific country case studies.
    4. Define key institutions and make comparisons across different types of political systems.
    5. Compare and contrast how political decisions are shaped by institutions and processes in various political systems.
    6. Relate comparisons across cases in order to gain a broader and deeper understanding of political events, institutions and processes.
    7. Compare and assess the impact of political decisions on individuals and groups in various political systems.
    8. Appraise how participation in the political process varies across political systems.
    9. Develop ability to categorize states according to the dominant typologies in the field.
    10. Describe the basic concepts and steps in conducting research in political science.
    Listed Topics
    1. Analytical techniques of political science
    2. Political institutions and power
    3. States and nations
    4. Democracy: theory and practice
    5. Political participation in democracies and non-democracies
    6. Political culture
    7. Political ideologies
    8. Political economy
    9. Country case studies (Americas, Africa, Europe, Middle-East and Asia)
    10. Countries and leaders
    Reference Materials
    Current text, internet
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 206 - International Relations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and theories within the field of International Relations. Focus will be given to examining the major contending theories of international behavior and understanding the major actors within the international political system. This course will also examine the possibilities and challenges facing the international community as the countervailing forces of globalization and ethnic nationalism shape the international political landscape. Sharp focus on US foreign policy will round out the conclusion of the course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the origins and nature of the nation-state system.
    2. Compare and contrast the different models of foreign policy analysis and how nation states interact over time.
    3. Explain the development and structure of the United Nations.
    4. Analyze the international political landscape as it is shaped by globalization and ethnic nationalism.
    5. Analyze the theories of “democratic peace” and “liberal peace” as they pertain to international relations.
    6. Compare and contrast the basic principles of neoconservative foreign policy with liberalism and realism.
    7. Compare and contrast constructivism with more traditional worldviews (i.e. realism, idealism, dependency theory, etc.)
    Listed Topics
    1. Competing conceptualizations of state behavior
    2. International political actors (the State, United Nations, WTO, etc.)
    3. Globalization
    4. Ethnic Nationalism
    5. Democratic peace
    6. Liberal peace
    7. The future of the Nation-State system and its possible replacement
    8. US foreign policy (criticism and defense)
    Reference Materials
    Contemporary text and appropriate AV materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • POL 228H - Comparative Cultures & Politics of India and United States


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This honors course provides theoretical and empirical tools to help students understand the comparative cultures and politics of India and the United States and how they intersect.  The course examines the political diversity between these two great democracies. Students explore how culture shapes the power relations and how political dynamics impact culture. Students undertake a short-term, study abroad experience to India to gain personal experience and first-hand knowledge of cultural and political institutions. Students also examine the cultural politics of gender and religion within contemporary India.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify culture in Asian and American societies.
    2. Explain the concept of democracy.
    3. Contrast presidential and parliamentary political systems.
    4. Distinguish the impact of culture on major social institutions like family, religion, education and politics.
    5. Analyze social problems and issues related to poverty and gender.
    6. Devise appropriate research methodologies for a research problem.
    Listed Topics
    1. Material and non-material culture
    2. Democracy and human rights
    3. Presidential and parliamentary systems
    4. Political and social institutions
    5. Politics of poverty and gender
    6. Research methodology

    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society and Citzenship
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/17/2019


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  • POL 229H - Honors Women and Politics Around the World


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    The course explores the relationship between women and politics in different countries of the world.  Women’s political  status and participation will be examined within the cultural, social and economic context in which they live and operate.  Women’s roles as citizens, voters, activists, freedom fighters, election candidates, leaders and development workers are particularly emphasized.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the relationship between gender and politics in different countries of the world.
    2. Compare and contrast the status of women world over, while examining their cultural, religious, social and economic context.
    3. Identify movements concerning women’s suffrage and women’s rights.
    4. Analyze women’s participation in the electoral processes of different electoral systems and their representation in national legislatures & executives.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of Women’s Suffrage.
    2. Women’s Representation in Politics.
    3. Cultural Context & Explanation
    4. Social and Economic Conditions of Women
    5. Democracy and Electoral Systems.
    6. International Women’s Movements
    Reference Materials
    Textbook: Current recognized texts, handouts, video’s, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/28/2017


    Course and Section Search



Psychology

  
  • PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides the student with an understanding of how the scientific method is applied to the study of human and animal behavior. Topics include: research results, the major principles and perspectives of psychology, applications of contemporary psychology, the structure and function of the nervous system, foundations of learning, intelligence, social behavior, personality, feeling and emotion, motivation, abnormal psychology and its causes and therapies, developmental patterns and the measurement of behavior.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe how psychology evolved as a science, including ethics as described by the American Psychological Association code of ethics and use of the scientific method and research results.
    2. Summarize the career opportunities in the field of psychology.
    3. Explain the basic elements of the brain, their functions as part of the nervous system and the role of neurotransmitters in some psychological disorders.
    4. Compare and contrast learning in terms of classical and operant conditioning and the cognitive-social approaches.
    5. Illustrate the types of memory including encoding, storage and retrieval plus causes and solutions for memory problems.
    6. Define intelligence using the major instruments or scales used to measure it.
    7. Apply the various motivational approaches to describe how behavior is directed and energized.
    8. Define personality, including various theories and approaches used in the study of the structure and development of personality.
    9. Analyze the etiology of the most severe forms of psychological disorders and evaluate the various treatment approaches for each. 
    10. Summarize the primary concepts of social psychology: bias, social influence, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, aggression and prosocial behavior.
    11. Analyze the major principles and perspectives of psychology and their application to contemporary psychology.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical antecedents of psychology, college psychology programs and careers for psychology majors
    2. Research methods, scientific research and ethical principles of research
    3. Biological processes underlying behavior, sensation and perception and states of consciousness
    4. Learning, memory, cognition, language and intelligence
    5. Motivation and emotion
    6. Human development
    7. Personality, psychological disorders and treatment of psychological disorders
    8. Social psychology, human sexuality and gender
    9. Health psychology
    10. The major principles of psychology
    11. Applications of contemporary psychology
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet resources, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 106 - Psychology of African Americans


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course presents the psychological principles shaping the personality of African Americans. The course includes a critique of the applicability of theories and measures across societal and culture gropus such as “traditional” statistics, racial myths, discriminatory thinking and behavior. Analysis of attitudes and behaviors which develop in non-prejudiced and prejudicial socio-economic, educational and political systems and ways to counteract them are reviewed. This course emphasizes proactive African-American leadership and the lifestyle of individual African Americans and their community.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define appropriate theoretical and research approaches dealing with psychological assumptions about African-American personality.
    2. Compare and contrast the effects of historical and current social/cultural events on African-American personality.
    3. Analyze the effects of proactive African-American religious, philosophical, economic and political initiatives.
    4. Summarize the processes and effects of discriminatory thinking and behavior.
    5. Define ethical principles of research.
    6. Compare the ethics of ethnocentrism by racial or ethnic group.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theoretical and research perspectives and ethical principles of research
    2. African and African-American slavery, holocaust and its effects on personality development
    3. African-American roots of religious and philosophical thought
    4. African-American economic, educational and political organizations and initiatives
    5. African-American liberation from mental slavery
    6. The process of discriminatory thinking and behavior and their effects
    7. African-American leadership and challenges
    8. African-American culture, identity and social change
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 107 - Human Relations


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course explores personal and group values across societal and cultural groups. Emphasis is on the use of the psychological set and the science of attitude change in developing leadership and on employee-employer, family and community interaction.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the theories of group processes, group norms and group dynamics and ethical principles in group work.
    2. Demonstrate self-confidence when dealing with others.
    3. Contrast male and female gender roles and sources of these differences.
    4. Explain laws dealing with gender.
    5. Define cultural diversity and describe the mental and physical challenges and the laws associated with these topics.
    6. Demonstrate guidelines for tolerance for individual differences.
    7. Debate the needs of the organization versus individual needs.
    Listed Topics
    1. The self
    2. Beliefs
    3. Values
    4. Goals
    5. Love
    6. Intimate relationships
    7. Leadership
    8. Work and laws governing work relationships
    9. Marriage
    10. Sexuality
    11. Physical, mental and cultural diversity
    12. Ethical principles of research and group work
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 108 - Human Growth and Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course combines specific areas of human development, for example, physical, cognitive, emotional and social development and specific developmental time periods: prenatal, infant, toddler, young childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle adulthood and older adulthood. Multiple developmental theories plus biological and ecological influence in each period demonstrate how the individual and the individual’s world interact in human development. The history of the study of human development and research methodologies specific to human development are included.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the major physical, cognitive, emotional and social aspects of development at each of the major stages in life.
    2. Compare and contrast the major views of development such as the Behavioristic, Psychoanalytical, Cognitive, Ethological, Humanistic, etc.
    3. Summarize the major theorists in Developmental Psychology, such as Freud, Piaget, Erikson, Skinner, Vygotsky, Maslow, Jung, etc.
    4. Describe the history of the study of human development incorporating the methodologies in developmental research, such as longitudinal studies, cross- sectional studies and cross-sequential studies and ethical principles of research.
    5. Define intelligence and compare the major theorists and their measurement instruments across the life span.
    6. Explain cultural diversity and identify the physical and mental challenges faced across the life span.
    7. Evaluate the effects of poverty on health and personality and solutions to these problems.
    8. Evaluate differences among the cognitive theories of development.
    Listed Topics
    1. The history of the study of human development and research design, research methodology and ethical principles of research in developmental studies
    2. Theoretical views of development
    3. Genetic influences on pre-and post-natal development
    4. Infancy health, cognition and personality
    5. Early childhood health, cognition and personality
    6. Middle childhood health, cognition and personality
    7. Adolescence health, cognition and personality
    8. Young adulthood health, cognition and personality
    9. Middle adulthood health, cognition and personality
    10. Late adulthood health, cognition and personality
    11. Death and dying, grief and loss
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 109 - Psychology of Women


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course surveys psychological assumptions in the shaping of the female personality across societal and cultural groups. Experimental research is examined. Emphasized are attitude, aptitude, self-concept formation, gender role-learning and the physiological and psychopathological bases of personality. Examination of the interaction of institutional, philanthropic, social economic, educational, political, legal and religious effects on attitudes, pathology and behavior is included.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the theoretical and research approaches dealing with the psychological assumptions about female personality.
    2. Analyze physiological and social/cultural effects on female personality.
    3. Compare and contrast the societal pressures on female opportunities in various cultures.
    4. Discuss ethical principles of research.
    5. Explain several cultural rules for both genders and evaluate the outcome.
    6. Analyze the etiology, classification and treatment of psychpathology in women.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theoretical perspectives, research methods and ethical principles of research
    2. Gender stereotypes and gender differences
    3. Gender and language
    4. Development across the life span
    5. Abilities, achievements and motivation
    6. Women and work
    7. Minority women/women in many cultures
    8. Biological influences on women’s behavior
    9. Women’s physical and mental health issues
    10. Female sexuality
    11. Victimization of women
    12. Women’s political issues/options
    13. Women in the health, mental health and criminal justice systems
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 113 - Psychology of Death and Dying


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course explores Thanatology, the study of death and dying. The course covers American attitudes toward death, biological and psychological definitions of death, crisis and grief, the psycho-social impact of terminal illness, contemporary funeral and burial rituals, ethical issues related to death and dying, the dynamics of suicide, prevention and intervention, the psychosocial management of dying patients and relatives, children, adolescents and death, old age and death and issues of loss and grief for the bereaved.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Differentiate personal and cultural-religious attitudes toward death and grief.
    2. Describe strategies for dealing with terminal illness.
    3. Compare and contrast the psychological significance of contemporary funeral and burial rites.
    4. Describe the causes, effects and preventive strategies/interventions associated with suicide and other violent deaths.
    5. List various community supports dealing with grief.
    6. Describe the various research methods and principles of research utilized in death and dying research.
    7. Assess the value of human life.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cross-cultural, religious, and historical attitudes toward death
    2. Health care systems and death
    3. Living with life-threatening illness
    4. Euthanasia
    5. Forms of grief-therapeutic interventions
    6. Funerals and body disposition
    7. The law and death
    8. Death in the lives of children, adolescents and adults
    9. Violent deaths, including suicide, homicide and risk taking behaviors– causes/intervention
    10. Beyond death–life after life
    11. Research methods and ethical principles of research
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 114 - Human Sexuality


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course examines the study of the human sexual experience which, provides practical information for everyday living in a digital age. Topics include psychosocial development, sexual biology, sex roles, human sexual responses, human sexual inadequacy, sexual attitudes and practices, sexual diseases and disorders and sex and society.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the development of gender roles and gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual techniques and behavior patterns over the life span and across cultures.
    2. Describe female and male sexual anatomy and physiology, contraception, abortion, sexual diseases and dysfunctions.
    3. Identify the elements necessary for attraction, love, relationships and commercial sex.
    4. List professional, digital, legal and ethical issues related to sexual behavior to include sexual coercion.
    5. Discuss sexual techniques and behavior patterns for the physically and mentally challenged.
    6. Evaluate various research methods and the ethics of research methods.
    7. Resolve cultural differences of the definitions of sexual deviance.
    8. Analyze definition and treatment for sexual dysfunction and deviance.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sexuality in childhood, adolescence and adulthood
    2. Female and male anatomy and physiology and the sexual response cycle
    3. Contraception, abortion, sexual diseases and dysfunctions
    4. Gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual techniques and behavior patterns
    5. Attraction, love and relationships and commercial sex
    6. Sexual coercion
    7. Professional, digital, legal and ethical issues
    8. Sexual techniques for people who are physically and mentally challenged
    9. Research methods for studying human sexuality and the ethics of these methods
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 115 - Stress Management


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course helps students develop stress management skills through the use of techniques for mental and physical wellness. Aspects of a healthy lifestyle include proper nutrition and diet, brain chemistry for well-being and the importance of exercise for physical wellness.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze courses of stress and physical response to stress.
    2. Outline the relationship between physical health and mental wellness.
    3. Explain the role of endorphins and brain chemistry.
    4. Analyze a personal diet and the importance of proper nutrition.
    5. Outline the various forms of exercise and the physical benefits of each.
    6. Develop a personal program of stress management and exercise.
    7. List balance strategies for life’s activities, i.e., work, home, school, etc.
    Listed Topics
    1. Physiological responses to stress
    2. Proper nutrition and healthy diet
    3. The relationship between mind and body
    4. Weight training
    5. Strength and endurance
    6. Relaxation and breathing techniques
    7. Cardiovascular exercise
    8. Yoga and meditation
    9. Balancing life’s activities
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet resources, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 116 - Organizational Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed for students in the technologies. It is a course in psychological theories and principles to improve supervisor and employee performance. Emphasis is on developing organizational behaviors that enhance employee satisfaction and produce profitable results in business, social institutions and governmental agencies.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the theory and application of motivational and leadership research in organizational psychology.
    2. Discuss the application of various legal rulings on supervisory and employee behavior such as affirmative action, rights of those with disabilities and cultural diversity.
    3. Develop individual strategies for handling work site dynamics and processes.
    4. Define research methods used in organizational psychology and ethical principles of research.
    5. Evaluate the criterion for standardized tests, psychological tests and performance appraisals in the work place.
    6. Evaluate the value systems of organizations.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of industrial/organizational psychology
    2. Psychological research methods and ethical principles
    3. Employee selection/retention principles and techniques
    4. Psychological testing and performance appraisals
    5. Leadership and decision making
    6. Motivation, morale, job satisfaction and job involvement
    7. Communication, perception, socialization, and group dynamics for all populations including minorities, women, elderly and physically and mentally challenged employees.
    8. Working conditions to include stress, safety, violence, substance abuse, digital use rules and health in the workplace.
    9. Organizational ethics and responsibilities
    10. Cross-cultural organizations-globalization
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 150 - Psychology of Intervention


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a course in the therapeutic techniques used to prevent, manage and diffuse crisis situations. Theoretical background is also provided. Focus is on passive resistance.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate implementing the helping process.
    2. Describe various major theoretical approaches to the helping process.
    3. Develop a personal approach to the helping process.
    4. List causes and sources of stress plus techniques to cope with stress.
    5. Demonstrate stress-coping techniques in personal and work situations for oneself and others.
    6. Analyze the parameters of various crisis situations then demonstrate integrating crisis techniques per these parameters.
    7. List ethical and legal issues involved in helping and crisis situations.
    8. Evaluate the value of aggressive versus non-aggressive lifestyle.
    Listed Topics
    1. The helping process
    2. The skilled helper
    3. Theories of helping, i.e., client-centered, Gestalt, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic
    4. An eclectic view of helping
    5. Stress: types, sources and causes
    6. Methods of coping with stress
    7. Parameters of crisis situations: general overview of emergency situations
    8. Parameters of various crisis situations; domestic violence, hospitalization, spousal abuse, child abuse, elder abuse, incestuous families, victims of rape and other violent crimes and suicidal persons
    9. Legal and safety issues
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet resources, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 201 - Educational Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course explores learning in an educational setting. Topics include theories of learning and teaching, the effects of digital methodologies, nature and development of the child, adolescent and adult learner, creativity, individual difference, standardized testing and classroom and on-line interaction.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the major theoretical positions central to the field of Educational Psychology.
    2. Discuss ethical and practical applications of these theories in contemporary educational settings.
    3. Compare parameters differentiating the child, adolescent and adult learner.
    4. Analyze the characteristics of good standardized and teacher-made learning assessments.
    5. Demonstrate classroom discipline strategies.
    6. Analyze legal mandates for teachers and educational institutions.
    7. Categorize the requirements for teacher licensing exams.
    8. Explain methods of research and the ethics governing research.
    9. Discuss the value of dedication to teaching.
    10. Compare on-line, in-class and hybrid learning strategies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Major educational development theories
    2. Diversity: racial, ethnic, gender, physical and mental challenges
    3. Learning, motivational, and classroom management theories
    4. Characteristics used to evaluate standardized and teacher-made learning assessments
    5. State and national licensing exams for teachers
    6. On-line and classroom learning and discipline strategies
    7. Federal and state laws regarding education
    8. Research methods in educational psychology
    9. Ethics in research, the classroom, school systems and with parents
    10. Teacher burnout
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet resources, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 202 - Social Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course is the study of individuals in their social and cultural setting.  Perception and judgment of social events, the socialization process, attitudes, values, social interaction, the individual in the group and the influences of personal and on-line culture on the development of personality are investigated.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe how scientific methodology and ethical research are applied to the study of human and social behavior.
    2. Analyze the behavior of the individual as a function of social stimuli.
    3. Explain social thinking - how we view ourselves and others.
    4. Apply insights gained through Social Psychology to everyday life.
    5. Contrast male and female gender roles and discuss causes of these differences.
    6. Interpret the effects of cultural diversity, physical and mental challenges on social behavior.
    7. Evaluate the application of social behavior in the health and criminal justice system.
    8. Appraise humanitarianism as a social value.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scientific methodology, ethical research and Social Psychology
    2. Social beliefs
    3. Attribution
    4. Behavior and attitudes
    5. Social cognition
    6. Cultural influences in person and on-line
    7. Conformity
    8. Persuasion
    9. Group influence
    10. Prejudice
    11. Aggression
    12. Attraction
    13. Altruism
    14. Cultural diversity
    15. Health and criminal justice systems
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 203 - Psychology of Adjustment


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course examines the personality dynamics and affective behavior of the normal individual. Emphasis is on various personality theories and their application. Discussed are facets of interpersonal relationships and factors relating to personal and online relationships, frustration, conflict, anxiety, guilt, individual differences, and the prevention and therapy for the deterioration of adjustment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compare theories and research on normal personality and affective development and their application.
    2. Examine elements of in-person and online interpersonal relationships.
    3. Apply theories of adjustment deterioration, its prevention and therapy.
    4. Synthesize the effects of diversity, physical and mental challenges on adjustment.
    5. Evaluate how integrity relates to adjustment.
    6. Evaluate theories of career development.
    Listed Topics
    1. Psychosocial development and the development of self
    2. Dealing with death, loss and grief
    3. Moral and ethical development
    4. Gender identity, gender roles, sexuality and intimate relationships
    5. Attraction, love, happiness, loneliness and solitude
    6. Adjustment deterioration theories, prevention and therapy
    7. Sources of stress and stress management
    8. Career identity development and work
    9. Antipathy, anger, aggression, frustration, conflict, grief, anxiety and guilt
    10. On-line relationships
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communcation
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 204 - Adolescent Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course examines the physical,emotional, moral, mental and social development of adolescents. Emphasis is on the personal use of information in adolescent experiences such as in-class and on-line school, career, peers, digital and family relationships.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the physical, emotional, moral and intellectual developmental patterns of adolescents and their interaction.
    2. Evaluate the cultural forces that interact with adolescent development.
    3. Summarize types of adolescent mental illness and evaluate therapy options.
    4. Describe the interaction of cultural diversity, physical and mental challenges and their effect on adolescents.
    5. Analyze research and the ethics of research in adolescent psychology.
    6. Synthesize adolescent commitment to value systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical perspective on adolescent psychology
    2. Research methods and the ethics of research
    3. Biological processes and physical development
    4. Cognitive development and social cognition
    5. Cultural diversity, physical and mental challenges
    6. Family, peer and school relationships
    7. Adolescents and the criminal justice system
    8. Self and identity
    9. Gender and sexuality
    10. Online learning and relationships
    11. Moral development, values and religion
    12. Achievement, careers and work
    13. Mental problems and therapy
    14. Health, stress and coping
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 208 - Abnormal Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course explores the psychological and physiological dynamics behind mental illnesses. Various psychological theories are integrated and provide a comprehensive framework for understanding mental illness.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the science of contemporary abnormal psychology.
    2. Discriminate the various major psychological disorders including known or theorized origins, symptoms, dynamics and treatment.
    3. Differentiate the scientific approaches to studying abnormal behavior.
    4. Identify the challenges of sufferers of mental disorders.
    5. List the legal requirements and ethical principles in abnormal psychology.
    6. Describe how cultural diversity and physical challenges interact with mental challenges and their treatment.
    7. Describe ways to develop societal respect for people with mental challenges.
    Listed Topics
    1. Brief history of the definitions and study of abnormality
    2. The major theories of abnormality
    3. Diagnostic criteria
    4. Research in abnormality
    5. The major mental health disorders, including anxiety, mood and personality disorders
    6. Chemical dependency
    7. Disorders of infancy, childhood and adolescence, early, middle and late adulthood
    8. Legal issues and hospitalization
    9. Various cultural definitions of abnormality
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citicenship
    Approved By: Dr Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 210 - Child Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course is a study of the child’s physical/biological, cognitive and psychosocial growth under a variety of environmental conditions. Topics include theories of development, physical/biological development, cognitive development and theories of personality formation, normal and abnormal development.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the physical, emotional, moral and intellectual developmental patterns of children.
    2. Explain the interrelatedness of the physical, emotional, moral and intellectual domains on the development of children.
    3. Analyze the role of cultural forces that interact with child development.
    4. Describe the educational challenges of children, including achievement.
    5. Describe mental illness of and therapy options for children.
    6. Explain the scientific method and various research methods used by researchers of children, including the ethical guidelines and implications of using children as subjects in research.
    7. Compare and contrast gender identity development and the role that it plays in children’s overall development.
    8. Describe the process of moral development in children.
    9. Explain the issues relevant to peer relationships and conflict between and among children.
    10. Describe some basic skills in relating to children.
    11. Describe the influence of parents and the effects and outcomes of various parenting styles.
    12. Explain various effective discipline approaches.
    13. Analyze the value of children in several cultures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical perspective on child psychology
    2. Research methods
    3. Biological processes and physical development
    4. Cognitive development and social cognition
    5. Information processing and intelligence
    6. Family relationships, parenting styles and types of discipline
    7. Peers: friendships and conflicts
    8. School, educational problems and solutions
    9. Culture
    10. Self and identity development
    11. Gender
    12. Sexuality
    13. Moral development and values
    14. Achievement
    15. Atypical development and treatment and therapy
    16. Health, stress and coping
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, video, internet resources, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 211 - Applied Psychology:Current Issues in Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course applies psychological principles and techniques to current problems and areas of human behavior such as education, vocational guidance, human engineering and management of personal problems.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate research journals related to applied psychology including their research methods and ethics.
    2. Apply basic scientific research and statistical procedures.
    3. Apply techniques of observation to consumer behavior.
    4. Distinguish biological, cognitive, emotional and social psychological issues.
    5. Define skills which are applied to the treatment of behavior disorders.
    6. Explain joy and how to integrate it into life.
    Listed Topics
    1. Research methods and ethical principles of research
    2. Theories of personality and their applications
    3. Cognitive development
    4. Theories of perception and their applications
    5. Theories of motivation and their applications
    6. Theories of abnormality and their treatment strategies
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts, internet resources and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 212 - Psychology of Developmental Disabilities


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course reviews the effects physical and mental challenges/disabilities have on the individual, family, education, employment and public accomondations. Coping skills, technological and online supports, professional issues, and federal laws dealing with disabling conditions, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Americans with Disabilities Act are included. Emphasis is on research and support techniques for people with disabilities, their families, schools, employers and public accommodations. Ethical issues are also considered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define causes and treatments of major disabilities.
    2. Describe the technological supports and coping/compensation skills required for the person and the person’s family, school, employer and public accommodations.
    3. Apply the legal requirements regarding education, employment and public accommodations for people with physical and mental challenges.
    4. Outline professional issues that support personnel encounter with this population, their families and employers.
    5. Identify legal and ethical issues related to persons with physical disabilities.
    6. Identify legal and ethical issues related to research with persons with physical disabilities.
    7. Prioritize ways to resolve conflicts among families and providers and people with disabilities.
    8. Explain technological advances that assist this population and ways to procure them.

     Listed Topics

    1. Physical and psychological needs of persons with physical and mental challenges
    2. Psychological reactions and adjustment to congenital vs adventitious disabilities
    3. Working with families, schools, public accommodations and employers of persons with physical and mental challenges
    4. Expectations and identity issues for persons with disabilities
    5. Resources for persons with disabilities, their families, educators, employers and public accommodations
    6. Professional issues for support personnel dealing with this population
    7. Ethical and legal considerations regarding persons with disabilities
    8. Ethical and legal considerations related to research with persons with physical disabilities
    9. Technological advances and procurement strategies for the technological advances for this population
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet resources, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 214 - Psychology of Adulthood


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course studies physical, cognitive, emotional and social issues from young adulthood to the last years of life. Topics include significant adult-life crises, coping strategies, marital status, vocational choice, the family and sexuality.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define personal identity as an adult.
    2. Analyze early, middle and late adulthood’s physical and mental health issues, neurocognitive changes, social adjustments, grandparenting, financial issues and retirement.
    3. Describe the grief processes.
    4. Explain the scientific method and various research methods used by researchers of adults, including the ethical guidelines and implications of using adults as subjects in research.
    5. List standards for child, adolescent and adult behavior
    Listed Topics
    1. The meaning of adulthood
    2. Development of intimacy
    3. Value of children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    4. Shared roles in marriage and partnerships
    5. Physical, mental, cognitive and emotional changes in adulthood
    6. What it means to be old
    7. Financial and lifestyle adjustments in adulthood and retirement
    8. Stereotyping of the aged
    9. Living arrangements and community services available for the aged
    10. Preparing to die
    11. Bereavement in families
    12. Research methods and ethical principles of research
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, internet, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 216 - Psychology in the Movies


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course provides an overview of various forms of mental illness.  Discussion is complemented by the use of full-length movies.  Symptoms and treatments of mental disorders are discussed and compared with their portrayal in the movies.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the science of contemporary abnormal psychology.
    2. Analyze the current classification scheme for mental disorders.
    3. List major categories of mental disorders and their symptoms.
    4. List treatment options for various mental disorders.
    5. Describe accuracies and inaccuracies in the portrayal of mental disorders in the movies.
    6. Analyze how cultural diversity and physical challenges interact with mental challenges and their treatment and how these are portrayed in the movies.
    7. Compare treatment options and discuss legal and ethical issues and how they are presented in the movies.
    8. Identify ways to encourage acceptance, compassion and understanding toward those suffering from mental disorders.

     Listed Topics

    1. Classification of mental disorders
    2. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)
    3. Treatment and therapy options
    4. Legal and ethical issues
    Reference Materials
    Current text, Internet, movies and related literature.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 230 - Counseling the Addict


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: SOC 117 , PSY 101  

     
    Description
    This course provides an in-depth look at counseling techniques as they relate to drug and alcohol use. Topics include case management, intervention techniques and assessment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify types of treatment: individual, group and twelve steps currently used in the field for addiction.
    2. Demonstrate assessment and case management models.
    3. Define the role the family plays in the etiology and treatment of all addiction.
    4. Discuss other addictive disorders including gambling, workaholism, exercise, sex, financial, nicotine and eating disorders.
    5. Define the concept of codependency.
    6. Define research methods and ethical principles of research with this population.
    Listed Topics
    1. Treatment modalities for individuals and families impacted by drug and alcohol use
    2. Assessment and case management
    3. Family roles and codependency
    4. Prevention, cessation and relapse
    5. Current interventions used in treatment
    6. Methods and ethical principles of research
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized texts, videos, handouts and library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communiction
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 240 - Health Psychology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  

     
    Description
    Health psychology is the study of biopsychosocial processes in health, illness and health care. This course is an investigation into the unity of the mind and body and their combined role in healing.  Students will explore the mind’s role in illness, the impact of negative emotion, the placebo effect and effective methods of treatment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the principles of mind-body medicine.
    2. Research the underlying premise of mind/body medicine.
    3. Explain the role of emotions in illness.
    4. Discuss the impact of stress on the immune system.
    5. Differentiate the impact of the mind and emotions on various body systems: circulatory, respiratory, endocrine,  digestive, lymphatic, muscular, nervous, reproductive, skeletal and excretory systems.
    6. Describe the impact of stress on the cardiovascular system.
    7. Identify the treatments available within integrative medicine to address illnesses at the mind-body level.
    8. Discuss the role a support system plays in health.
    9. Describe the role of psychotherapy in creating optimism, hope and control.
    Listed Topics
    1. Research design, research methodology and ethical principles of research in health psychology
    2. Theoretical views on the role of health psychology
    3. Genetic influences on health and mental health
    4. The biopsychosocial model
    5. The role of stress on health-related ailments
    6. Primary prevention and positive psychology
    7. Biological foundations of health and illness
    8. Exercise, sleep and injury prevention
    9. Nutrition, obesity and eating disorders
    10. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes
    11. Cancer and HIV/AIDS
    12. Substance use, abuse and addiction
    13. Pain
    14. The role of health psychology in health care settings and integrative medicine
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, additional reading materials and videos.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 270 - Statistics for Behavioral and Social Sciences


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 101  or SOC 101  or ANT 101  and MAT 108  

     
    Description
    This course introduces concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics used in the behavioral and social sciences. It includes: central tendency, variability and distributions; correlation, regression, chi square and other non-paramentic tests; hypothesis testing and sampling; type I error, type II error, confidence intervals and power; statistical packages and their application to hypothesis testing.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze statistical choices in published research.
    2. Compute and interpret statistical formula.
    3. Identify the uses and limits of specific statistics.
    4. Choose appropriate statistics for analyzing data.
    5. Analyze the type of data that is appropriate for hypothetical research studies.
    6. Perform statistical analysis using software packages.
    7. Describe the relationship between samples and populations.
    8. Identify levels of measurement and statistics appropriate for the levels of measurement: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio.
    9. Describe the difference between descriptive and inferential statistics.
    Listed Topics
    1. Samples and populations
    2. Levels of measurement, chi square tests for nominal data, non-paramentic tests for ordinal data
    3. Using frequency distributions to summarize data
    4. Measures of central tendency and dispersion
    5. Z-scores and z-test
    6. The standard normal curve and elementary probability
    7. Correlation coefficients and regression
    8. Proportion of variance
    9. Null and alternative hypotheses and hypothesis testing
    10. Type I and type II error
    11. Single sample t-test, independent samples t-test, related samples t-test
    12. Effect size
    13. One-way within subjects ANOVA, one-way between subjects ANOVA
    14. Post-hoc tests
    Reference Materials
    Texts, statistical packages, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • PSY 290 - Research Methods and Applications


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: PSY 270  

     
    Description
    This course explores scientific research methodology of the behavioral sciences covering descriptive, correlational, quasi-experimental, experimental, single IV, basic factorial and single case designs. The scientific method is used to study group and individual attitudes and behavior. Topics include research ethics, establishing construct plus internal and external validity, sampling techniques, research error, control of variables and data analysis by statistical methods. Students also study methods of conducting a literature review, generating ideas and hypotheses, collecting, grouping, analyzing and reporting research findings, experience running labs and debriefing “live” subjects.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Retrieve materials from research journals and other sources of scientific research.
    2. Define the various kinds of research methods/designs employed in behavioral science studies and ethical principles of research.
    3. Analyze methods of maintaining validity and manipulating variables plus analyzing data.
    4. Write research proposals and reports using the accepted journal format.
    5. Describe ways to address deceptions and abdications in research.
    Listed Topics
    1. Goals and limitations of research
    2. Library and other informational tools to develop a literature review
    3. Research designs
    4. Sampling
    5. Construct validity, external validity, internal validity and reliability
    6. Experimental control measures
    7. Hypothesis formulation
    8. Research error
    9. Hypothesis testing
    10. The formal proposal and report
    11. Ethical principles of research
    12. Running experiments and debriefing subjects
    Reference Materials
    current text, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/11/2019


    Course and Section Search



Radiation Therapy Technology

  
  • RTT 101 - Introduction to Radiation Therapy


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 108 , BIO 110  or BIO 151 , PHY 100  or advanced-placement high school physics with a “C” or above

     
    Description
    This is an introduction to the principles of radiation therapy. The student learns the duties and responsibilities of a radiation therapist and the types of equipment and procedures used in patient care. The laboratory portion of this course focuses on performance of basic patient care skills and utilization of immobilization.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

    1. Examine the basic principles of cancer and cancer pathology
    2. Categorize equipment used for radiation therapy treatment and demonstrate thier uses
    3. Explain basic principles of radiation for therapeutic treatment
    4. Apply techniques of proper infection control practices
    5. Identify surface anatomy to demonstrate proper body mechanics and patient positioning techniques
    6. Perform patient assessments to interpret and document accurately in medical record
    7. Justify ethical principles applicable to the healthcare setting
    8. Demonstrate proper body mechanics to perform various treatment procedural set-ups
    9. Outline the process of x-ray production
    Listed Topics
    1. Overview of cancer and pathology
    2. Immobilization devices
    3. Body mechanics
    4. Medical imaging and x-ray production
    5. Legal and ethical principles
    6. Infection control
    7. Emergencies in healthcare
    8. Surface anatomy and positioning
    9. Treatment procedures
    10. Other treatment modalities
    11. Patient assessment, care and education
    12. The medical record and charting
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/16/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 102 - Fundamentals of Radiation Therapy


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 
    Co-requisites: RTT 112C  

    Description
    A course in which the student therapist becomes familiar with all types of radiation therapy equipment, learns the types of treatment employed, and learns the use of hand and computer dosimetry in treatment planning. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and discuss the principles and practice procedures of radiation therapy technology.
    2. Identify and discuss basic treatment and simulation equipment in radiation therapy.
    3. Identify formulas and perform simple dose calculations.
    4. Identify and discuss the theory, operation, applications, and limitations of radiation detection devices.
    5. Explain importance of radiation safety procedures and quality assurance standards in radiation therapy clinical and technical areas.
    6. Discuss the significance of treatment outcomes for patient care.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pre-treatment and treatment procedures
    2. Conventional Terminology/Nomenclature in Radiation Therapy
    3. Basic Dosimetry
    4. Conventional and CT Simulators
    5. Linear Accelerators
    6. Basic radiation therapy dosimetry and dose calculations
    7. Measurement of ionizing radiation
    8. Measurement of radiation absorbed dose in tissue equivalent material
    9. Radiation Safety and Protection
    10. Quality Assurance/Improvement Standards
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 112C - Fundamentals of Radiation Therapy Clinical


    Credits: 1
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101  
    Co-requisites: RTT 102  

    Description
    An Introductory clinical course in which students observe radiation therapy personnel in their daily treatment routine and receive hands-on experience with treatment equipment necessary to become a competent and qualified Radiation Therapist. Students are supervised by a certified Radiation Therapist. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare treatment room with correct positioning and immobilization devices.
    2. Perform simple patient set-up techniques.
    3. Utilize proper body mechanics when assisting patients.
    4. Assess patients for side effects.
    5. Assist with fabrication of patient shielding.
    6. Interpret blood value reports.
    7. Utilize radiation safety techniques.
    8. Perform morning warm up quality assurance procedures.
    9. Perform basic knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    10. Complete patient case studies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Evaluations & Competencies
    2. Radiation Safety Techniques
    3. Case Studies
    4. Quality Assurance
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society, Clinical forms, logs, outlines.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 120C - Applied Radiation Therapy 1


    Credits: 4
    600 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C  

     
    Description
    Ten weeks of practicum in a clinical facility, participating in the duties performed by a radiation therapist. The student observes the initial clinical evaluation of the patient and aids in treatment planning and follow-up. Under supervision, the student positions, plans, and treats the patient, calculates and records dosage, checks the patient’s treatment records, and observes the patient in a routine follow-up. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform basic knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    2. Perform advanced knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    3. Perform basic knowledge/skills simulation competencies.
    4. Differentiate between hand calculations and computer dosimetry.
    5. Utilize proper body mechanics to assist patients.
    6. Construct beam fabrication shields.
    7. Evaluate and assess patient’s daily condition before treatment.
    8. Practice radiation protection and safety techniques.
    9. Perform morning QA warm up procedures.
    10. Complete patient case study reports.
    Listed Topics
    1. Evaluations
    2. Treatment and Simulation Competencies
    3. Dosimetry Workbook
    4. Case Study Outline
    5. Clinical Quiz Outline
    6. Quality Assurance & Radiation Safety
    7. Patient Care Review
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society, Clinical forms, log sheets, outlines
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 201 - Theoretical Radiation Therapy 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C , RTT 120C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 202C  

    Description
    This is a course in treatment equipment used in radiation therapy. Instruction includes the use, components and maintenance of external beam and brachytherapy equipment. Advanced techniques in treatment planning are introduced. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and describe major components of therapy equipment.
    2. Perform advanced hand dosimetry utilizing axial plane slices.
    3. Identify brachytherapy radioactive materials used for implants.
    4. Calculate for external beam photons, electron beams and brachytherapy.
    5. Define, describe and discuss components of a quality control management program.
    6. Distinguish between safe and hazardous equipment operation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Simulator, treatment, and treatment planning equipment and procedures
    2. Immobilization & Contours
    3. Calibrations for PDD, TAR, TPR, TMR
    4. Inhomogeniety Calculations
    5. Wedges and Compensators
    6. Irregular Field Calculations
    7. Rotational Therapy
    8. Photon and Electron Beam Therapy
    9. Brachytherapy Materials and Implant Techniques
    10. Quality Control Measures
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 202C - Radiation Therapy Clinical Practicum 1


    Credits: 4
    360 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C , RTT 120C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 201  

    Description
    This is a course conducted in a clinical facility where, under direct supervision the student gains more advanced training and experience in the operation of radiation therapy equipment. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform basic knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    2. Perform advanced knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    3. Perform basic knowledge/skills simulation competencies.
    4. Perform advanced knowledge/skills simulation competencies.
    5. Access and interpret patient’s treatment chart.
    6. Utilize good body mechanics in assisting patients.
    7. Utilize radiation safety techniques.
    8. Construct custom beam fabrication shields.
    9. Complete case studies.
    10. Perform hand calculations and correlate computer dosimetry.
    11. Interpret pertinent blood value reports on medical charts.
    12. Perform morning warm up and quality assurance procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Equipment and Computers
    2. Patient Charting
    3. Evaluations and Competencies
    4. Treatment Planning
    5. Case Studies
    6. Radiation Safety and QA
    7. Dosimetry
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society, Clinical forms, logs, case study outlines, quiz outlines, dosimetry workbook.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 203 - Radiation Therapy Technology 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ARRT Registry in Radiography or B.S. degree with clinical radiation oncology background.
    Co-requisites: RTT 204C , PHY 125  

    Description
    This course provides a study of oncology, basic radiation therapy physics, and treatment planning, as well as the operation and maintenance of radiation therapy equipment. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and discuss the policies and procedures of the educational program.
    2. Identify and define oncology principles and the multidisciplinary approach to treatment.
    3. Identify the function of all radiation therapy equipment components.
    4. Define and describe key radiation therapy terminology and procedures.
    5. Identify and discuss the medico-legal aspects of health care.
    6. Define and describe importance of radiation safety and protection.
    7. Identify and define various components of a quality assurance/management program.
    8. Define concepts of dosimetry and perform simple dose calculations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Role of the Radiation Therapist
    2. Scope of Practice
    3. Detection and Diagnosis of Cancer
    4. Medico-Legal Aspects & Code of Ethics
    5. Treatment Procedures & Equipment
    6. Calibrations
    7. Simulation Techniques
    8. Immobilization and Positioning
    9. Radiation Safety & Protection
    10. Quality Assurance/Management
    11. Record Keeping
    12. Dose Calculations
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 204C - Clinical Radiation Therapy 1


    Credits: 4
    360 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: ARRT Registry in Radiography or BS Degree with Radiation Oncology Clinical Experience.
    Co-requisites: RTT 203 , PHY 125  

    Description
    This course will be conducted in a clinical facility where, under direct supervision, the certificate student will gain training and experience in radiation therapy techniques and in the operation of radiation therapy equipment. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform basic knowledge/skill treatment competencies.
    2. Perform advanced knowledge/skill treatment competencies.
    3. Perform basic knowledge/skill simulation competencies.
    4. Perform advanced knowledge/skill simulation competencies.
    5. Access and interpret patient’s treatment chart.
    6. Utilize good body mechanics in assisting patients.
    7. Demonstrate radiation protection and safety techniques.
    8. Construct beam fabrication shields.
    9. Interpret pertinent blood value reports.
    10. Assess patient daily for treatment readiness.
    11. Complete patient case study reports.
    12. Perform morning warm and quality assurance procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Equipment and Computers
    2. Patient Charting
    3. Evaluations and Competencies
    4. Treatment Planning
    5. Radiation Safety and Quality Assurance
    6. Quiz Requirements
    7. Case Study Requirements
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society
    Clinical Forms
    Timecards and Logs
    Case Study Outlines
    Quiz Outlines
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 211 - Theoretical Radiation Therapy 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C , RTT 120C , RTT 201 , RTT 202C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 212C  

    Description
    This is a course in the theory of computer use in treatment planning, assessment and maintenance of simulation and treatment equipment, techniques in image processing and high energy linear accelerators. Emphasis is on advanced computerized treatment planning. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and describe computer treatment planning techniques for external beam and brachytherapy.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of advanced planning concepts by body system.
    3. Identify and describe common tumorcidal doses, fractionation schedules, field placement borders, common routes of spread and techniques allowing reduction of dose to critical normal structures.
    4. Develop and apply problem solving as it relates to advanced dosimetry and hand calculations.
    5. Differentiate between external beams and implant radiotherapy.
    6. Apply quality assurance/improvement standards to treatment planning.
    7. Examine the purpose and function of record and verify systems.
    8. Develop multiple treatment plans using standard case study approach.
    Listed Topics
    1. Computer treatment planning advanced concepts
    2. Positioning and Immobilization Tools
    3. Simulators and Linear Accelerators
    4. Electronic Charting Systems
    5. Computer software differences
    6. 3 Dimensional Treatment Plans
    7. Cross Sectional Anatomy
    8. Photon and Electron Beams
    9. Brachytherapy
    10. Treatment Volumes and Doses
    11. Critical Structures and Side Effects
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 212C - Radiation Therapy Clinical Practicum 2


    Credits: 4
    360 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C , RTT 120C , RTT 201 , RTT 202C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 211  

    Description
    The student advances in technical competence on treatment units and simulator. The student will be afforded an opportunity to use a treatment planning computer, image processor and calibration equipment under direct supervision in a clinical facility. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform basic knowledge/skills treatment competencies
    2. Perform advanced knowledge/skills treatment competencies
    3. Perform basic knowledge/skills simulation competencies
    4. Perform advanced knowledge/skills simulation competencies
    5. Evaluate patient on a daily basis for treatment readiness
    6. Access and interpret patient’s treatment chart
    7. Construct custom beam fabrication shields
    8. Perform dose calculations and correlate to computer dosimetry
    9. Practice radiation protection and safety techniques
    10. Perform QA warm up procedures
    11. Complete patient case study reports
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient Charting
    2. QA Warm Up
    3. Evaluations
    4. Quiz Outlines
    5. Treatment & Simulation Competencies
    6. Dosimetry Workbook
    7. Radiation Safety Procedures
    8. Case Study Reports
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society
    Case study outline
    Clinical log sheets
    Clinical quiz outline
    Clinical forms
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 213 - Radiation Therapy Technology 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 203 , RTT 204C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 214C  

    Description
    This course is designed to present advanced concepts in radiation therapy technology, extensive time will be spent on radiation therapy dosimetry concepts. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform advanced hand dosimetry and dose calculations.
    2. Recognize and identify computer treatment planning techniques for external beam and brachytherapy.
    3. Differentiate between photon and electron beam treatment techniques.
    4. Differentiate between external beams and implant radiotherapy planning.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of advanced treatment planning concepts by body system.
    6. Apply radiation safety and quality assurance standards to patient treatment planning.
    7. Examine the purpose and function of record and verify electronic charting systems.
    8. Develop multiple treatment plans using standard case study approach.
    Listed Topics
    1. Computer treatment planning advanced concepts
    2. Positioning and Immobilization Tools
    3. Linear Accelerators
    4. Record and Verify Electronic Charting Systems
    5. Treatment Planning Computer Software Differences
    6. 3 Dimensional Treatment Plans
    7. Treatment Volumes and Doses
    8. Cross Sectional Anatomy
    9. Photon and Electron Beam Calibrations
    10. Brachytherapy
    11. Wedges and Compensators
    12. Inhomogenieties
    13. Field Separation
    14. Irregular Fields
    15. Critical Structures and Side Effects
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 214C - Clinical Radiation Therapy 2


    Credits: 4
    360 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 203 , RTT 204C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 213  

    Description
    The certificate student advances in technical competence and learns to use a computer, simulator and calibrate equipment under direct supervision in a clinical facility. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform basic knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    2. Perform advanced knowledge/skills treatment competencies.
    3. Perform basic knowledge/skills simulation competencies.
    4. Perform advanced knowledge/skills simulation competencies.
    5. Evaluate patient on a daily basis for treatment readiness.
    6. Access and interpret patient’s treatment chart.
    7. Perform hand calculations and correlate computer dosimetry.
    8. Construct custom beam fabrication shields.
    9. Practice radiation protection and safety techniques.
    10. Perform QA warm up procedures.
    11. Complete patient case study reports.
    Listed Topics
    1. Patient Charting
    2. QA Warm Up
    3. Evaluations
    4. Quiz Outlines & Dosimetry Workbook
    5. Treatment Competencies
    6. Case Study Reports
    7. Simulation Competencies
    8. Radiation Safety Procedures
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society
    Case study outline
    Clinical log sheets
    Clinical quiz outline
    Clinical forms
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 215 - Medical Imaging and Simulation


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C , RTT 120C , RTT 201 , RTT 202C  
    Co-requisites: RTT 211 , RTT 212C  

    Description
    This is a course which covers two main components of radiation therapy technology. The first section will provide the student with the opportunity to examine human structure as it appears through medical imaging. The student will be required to recognize and identify anatomical landmarks utilized as reference points in patient positioning and set up. Emphasis is placed on cross-sectional anatomy. The second section of the course will provide the student with the fundamentals of radiographic exposure technique. Processing of images will be discussed as they are related to simulations and treatment planning with a focus on three-dimensional views. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and describe human structure relating to medical imaging.
    2. Recognize and identify anatomical landmarks.
    3. Identify and describe image characteristics, techniques, and processing.
    4. Define and describe quality indicators in medical imaging equipment.
    5. Define and describe simple and complex immobilization techniques and equipment.
    6. Perform a patient contour on a phantom.
    7. Present a complete case study on a patient undergoing simulation and treatment planning procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Image Characteristics
    2. Skeletal system anatomy in multiple planes
    3. Medical Imaging Equipment and Procedures
    4. Simulation Procedures and Equipment
    5. CT Specific Terminology: CT Hounsfield Units and Field of View
    6. Quality Control Indicators as part of a Quality Management Program
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts, scientific calculator.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 218 - Radiation Oncology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 201  or RTT 203  
    Co-requisites: RTT 211  or RTT 213  

    Description
    This is a course in the study of malignant disease by anatomical systems with emphasis on the staging and grading of tumors, their site of origin, and their spread and involvement. Multiple modalities of cancer treatment are explored. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define and describe terminology related to neoplasia and neoplasms.
    2. Differentiate between benign and malignant neoplasms.
    3. Define and describe carcinogenesis.
    4. Differentiate between etiology and epidemiology of malignant neoplasms.
    5. Define and describe tumor classification based on histology and tumor characteristics.
    6. Define and describe the multidisciplinary approach to treatment of malignant neoplasms.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cancer detection and prevention
    2. Types of cancer
    3. Grading and staging of tumors
    4. Karnofsky performance scale
    5. Treatment options
    6. Direct extension, hemopoetic and lymphatic spread
    7. Prognosis
    Reference Materials
    Required textbooks, power point handouts, miscellaneous handouts.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 219 - Radiation Seminar


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 201  
    Co-requisites: RTT 211 , RTT 215 , RTT 218  

    Description
    This course provides a discussion of current literature and publications, new procedures, new radiation therapy equipment, trends in therapeutic methodology, trends in the health care industry (e.g.:demographic patterns, managed care). Included are special presentations by guest lecturers and students. Emphasis is placed on resume writing and interviewing skills. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Employ research writing skills.
    2. Demonstrate oral communication skills.
    3. Identify motives or causes of current health care trends.
    4. Interpret job descriptions and organizational flow charts.
    5. Formulate job search skills as they pertain to the Radiation Therapy profession.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hospice Care
    2. Death and Dying
    3. Managed Care/Risk Management
    4. Gerontology and Elder Care
    5. Hospital and Departmental Organization
    6. Resume and Interviewing Skills
    7. Case Studies – Radiation Therapy Patients
    8. Research Paper – Oncology Topic of Student’s Choice
    Reference Materials
    Handouts, library workshop, presentations.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 220C - Radiation Therapy Externship


    Credits: 5
    385 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 101 , RTT 102 , RTT 112C , RTT 120C , RTT 201 , RTT 202C , RTT 211 , RTT 212C  

     
    Description
    This course is a combination of classroom lecture/lab and clinical externship for the degree student completing the program in radiation therapy technology. The student will be afforded the opportunity, under direct supervision, to perform the duties and learn the responsibilities of a radiation therapist. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform advanced knowledge/skill treatment competencies
    2. Calculate dosage
    3. Evaluate patient on a daily basis for treatment readiness
    4. Access and interpret patient’s treatment chart
    5. Perform hand calculations and correlate computer dosimetry
    6. Construct custom beam fabrication shields
    7. Utilize radiation protection and safety techniques
    8. Perform quality assurance procedures
    9. Complete case studies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Oncology Review
    2. Quality Assurance
    3. Brachytherapy
    4. Treatment Planning Techniques
    5. Simulation Competencies
    6. Treatment Competencies
    7. Pt. Care Review
    8. Case Study Outline
    9. Side Effects Review
    10. Radiobiology Review
    11. Dosimetry Workbook
    12. Radiation Protection
    13. Board Review
    Reference Materials
    Required Textbooks, Handouts, Clinical Forms, Logs, Outlines, Computer Software, Mock Boards.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RTT 221C - Radiation Therapy Externship


    Credits: 5
    385 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RTT 203 , RTT 204C , RTT 213 , RTT 214C  

     
    Description
    This course is a combination of classroom lecture and clinical externship for the certificate student completing the Radiation Therapy Technology Program. Under direct supervision, the student will gain knowledge and experience in advanced/complex techniques utilized in cancer treatment. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform advanced knowledge/skill treatment competencies
    2. Calculate dosage
    3. Evaluate patient on a daily basis for treatment readiness
    4. Access and interpret patient’s treatment chart
    5. Perform hand calculations and correlate computer dosimetry
    6. Construct custom beam fabrication shields
    7. Utilize radiation protection and safety techniques
    8. Perform quality assurance procedures
    9. Complete case studies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Oncology Review
    2. Treatment Competencies
    3. Pt. Care Review
    4. Quality Assurance
    5. Simulation Competencies
    6. Side Effects Review
    7. Brachytherapy
    8. Case Study Outline
    9. Radiobiology Review
    10. Treatment Planning Techniques
    11. Board Review
    12. Dosimetry Workbook
    Reference Materials
    Required Textbooks, Handouts, Clinical Forms, Logs, Outlines, Computer Software, Mock Boards.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search



Radiologic Technology

  
  • RAD 107 - Radiologic Technology 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the RAD program.
    Co-requisites: BIO 161  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the profession of radiologic technology. Included are the basic principles of radiation protection for the patient and radiographer, the production and control of the X-ray beam to achieve photographic results, the basic techniques of body manipulation to demonstrate the anatomy of medical interest and the language of medicine relevant to radiologic technology. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe and name the major components of radiography and the profession.
    2. Define the functions of the radiographer.
    3. Manipulate radiographic equipment for various X-ray procedures.
    4. Examine the major procedural categories in radiology departments required for patient care services.
    5. Formulate basic radiographic technical factors utilized to produce the X-ray beam.
    6. Determine appropriate radiation protection measures for patient care and safety.
    Listed Topics
    1. HeRadiographer credentialing
    2. Hospital and imaging center scheme
    3. Radiology department protocols
    4. Accreditation agencies for radiology professions
    5. Patient care techniques
    6. Medical terminology
    7. Universal precautions
    8. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
    9. Radiation hazards
    10. X-ray unit components
    11. Interactions of the X-ray beam
    12. Process radiograph
    13. Basic body positioning
    14. Clinical observation
    15. Patient transfer techniques
    16. Scope of Practice Standards and Laws
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate equipment, software and textbooks.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 108C - Radiologic Technology Clinical 1


    Credits: 4
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites:  RAD 107  
    Co-requisites: RAD 157  

    Description
    This course is an application of the basic skills and concepts of radiation protection, positioning and radiographic technique under the direct supervision of the Radiologist, clinical coordinator, clinical instructor and certified technologist. Students become familiar with various types of radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment and apply concepts learned in the first term courses. Interactive skills and knowledge of the hospital/health team are expanded. Students practice professional ethical protocols with patients and members of the health team. Upon completion of this course students are oriented to the assigned clinical sites. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students are charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify basic X-ray procedures to be performed.
    2. Apply basic skills necessary to function with a radiographer.
    3. Manipulate radiographic equipment for various X-ray procedures.
    4. Generate necessary medical requisitions/forms to document procedural categories in radiology departments required for patient care services.
    5. Formulate basic radiographic technical factors utilized to produce the X-ray beam under supervision.
    6. Determine and apply appropriate radiation protection measures for patient care and safety for all assigned examinations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Department protocols
    2. Requisition evaluation
    3. Facility readiness
    4. Rapport with patients and staff
    5. Radiographic equipment
    6. Medical terminology
    7. Universal precautions
    8. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
    9. Radiation hazards
    10. X-ray unit components
    11. Processing images
    12. Patient Bill of Rights
    13. Radiographic positioning
    14. Physician teams
    Reference Materials
    RAD Clinical Handbook and Clinical Competency Evaluation Forms.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 157 - Radiologic Technology 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: RAD 107  
    Co-requisites: BIO 162  and RAD 108C  

    Description
    This course is an expansion on radiologic theory. The student will be introduced to more complex tasks associated with controlling image characteristics, theory and application of radiographic accessories, more complex positioning of the skeleton, radiography of the nonosseous systems and complementary imaging modalities. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Manipulate technical factors influencing and controlling image sharpness and recorded detail.
    2. Evaluate radiographic quality of all image formations produced.
    3. Manipulate radiographic equipment for various complex X-ray procedures.
    4. Identify principles of analog and digital film quality for human anatomy of interest.
    5. Formulate complex radiographic technical factors utilized to produce the X-ray beam.
    6. Classify appropriate radiation protection measures for patient categories.
    7. Employ radiation safety measures at all times for assigned examinations.

     Listed Topics

    1. Equipment manipulation
    2. Technique formations
    3. Image characteristics
    4. Analog vs digital
    5. Radiographic equipment
    6. Medical terminology
    7. Universal precautions
    8. Nonosseous systems
    9. Radiation hazards
    10. Complex X-ray unit components
    11. Processing images
    12. Imaging modalities
    13. Radiographic positioning
    14. Trauma care
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate equipment, software and textbooks.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 158C - Radiologic Technology Clinical 2


    Credits: 4
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , RAD 108C  and RAD 157  

     
    Description
    This course provides the student with clinical experience, knowledge and practice in radiographic positioning with emphasis on the more complex procedures associated with the skull and thorax. The student is expected to demonstrate, analyze and apply knowledge of factors that influence radiographic quality as well as manipulate those factors. The student works under direct supervision of a certified technologist and Radiologist. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the radiographic anatomy of X-ray procedures performed.
    2. Convert latent X-ray images into visible images utilizing various processing modalities.
    3. Manipulate radiographic equipment for various complex X-ray procedures.
    4. Solve patient care questions with assistance from qualified staff.
    5. Formulate complex radiographic technical factors that produce the X-ray beam.
    6. Classify appropriate radiation protection measures for patient categories.
    7. Employ radiation safety measures at all times for assigned examinations.
    8. Critique radiographs for image quality.
    9. Generate X-ray reports as required by assigned clinical staff.
    Listed Topics
    1. Equipment manipulation
    2. Technique formations
    3. Image characteristics
    4. Analog vs digital
    5. Radiographic equipment
    6. Medical terminology
    7. Universal precautions
    8. Nonosseous systems
    9. Radiation hazards
    10. Complex X-ray unit components
    11. Processing images
    12. Imaging modalities
    13. Radiographic positioning
    14. Trauma care
    15. Patient variables
    16. Accessory devices
    Reference Materials
    RAD Clinical Handbook and Clinical Competency Evaluation Forms.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 207 - Radiologic Technology 3


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , PHY 100 , RAD 157  and RAD 158C  
    Co-requisites: PHY 128  and RAD 208C  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to specialized radiographic procedures of nonskeletal areas and the biological effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. It also includes a review of the basic radiation cell physiology and chemistry that influence somatic and genetic responses from ionized tissue. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify cell structures.
    2. Explain the important functions of organic and inorganic compounds which exist in cells.
    3. List the various physical characteristics of DNA and RNA.
    4. Describe the processes of mitosis and meiosis. 
    5. Determine how cells are affected by the process of energy transfer.
    6. Classify cells types.
    7. Examine effects of ionizing radiation upon the cell.
    8. Describe selective and general angiographic studies.
    9. Compare basic radiographic procedures of nonskeletal areas of the body to more complex imaging modalities.
    10. Identify analog and digital complex images produced in radiology departments.

     Listed Topics

    1. Human cell types
    2. Linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)
    3. Analog vs digital images
    4. Mitosis and meiosis
    5. Chemical and biological damages
    6. Direct and indirect affects to DNA
    7. Law of Bergonie and Tribondeau
    8. Radiation hazards
    9. Special procedures
    10. Radiation biology
    11. Processing images
    12. Imaging modalities
    13. Radiographic positioning
    14. Trauma care
    15. Contrast agents
    16. Accessory devices
    17. Seldinger Technique
    18. Operative C-ARM Procedures
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate equipment, software and textbooks.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Information Literacy
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 208C - Radiologic Technology Clinical 3


    Credits: 4
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: BIO 162 , RAD 157  and RAD 158C  
    Co-requisites: RAD 207  

    Description
    This course expands on the knowledge and practice of radiographic and fluoroscopic procedures under direct supervision of a certified technologist and Radiologist. Competency level skills increase and performance of radiographic procedures are conducted more proficiently with identification of pathology, disease and disorders. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students are charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the full range of positions for the spinal column and the digestive system.
    2. Identify complex analog and digital images as produced in radiology departments.
    3. Produce radiographs that display proper technical factors to demonstrate pathology.
    4. Manipulate basic and complex analog and digital X-ray equipment.
    5. Scrutinize image formations necessary for Radiologists to diagnose disease and injury.
    6. Utilize equipment for complex procedures.
    7. Classify pathological conditions.
    8. Examine radiographs that demonstrate appropriate image formations.
    9. Describe selective and general angiographic studies with clinical staff.
    10. Produce basic and complex radiographs of procedures assigned by Radiologists.
    Listed Topics
    1. Spinal column
    2. Digestive system
    3. Radiographic pathology
    4. Analog vs digital
    5. Patient care tasks
    6. Maintaining facilities
    7. Accessory devices
    8. Portable machines
    9. Radiation hazards
    10. Special procedures
    11. Processing images
    12. Imaging modalities
    13. Radiographic positioning
    14. Trauma care
    15. Contrast agents
    16. Special devices
    17. Seldinger Technique
    18. Operative C-ARM Procedures
    Reference Materials
    RAD Clinical Handbook and Clinical Competency Evaluation Forms.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 217 - Radiologic Technology 4


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: RAD 207  and RAD 208C  
    Co-requisites: RAD 218C  

    Description
    This course includes a review of radiographic pathology, an introduction to optional supplementary imaging modalities and a review of the required functions of the radiologic technologist in preparing for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Examination in Radiography. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the full range of human pathologies as diagnosed within a radiology department.
    2. Operate a radiology department computer system.
    3. Qualify technical factors to demonstrate pathologies utilizing analog, computer and digital radiology.
    4. Examine supplementary modalities utilized to diagnose human pathology.
    5. Compare image formations necessary for each examination performed in a radiology department.
    6. Solve basic and complex density, contrast, detail and distortion imaging formulas.
    7. Describe and compare short-term and long-term effects from radiation exposure.
    8. Classify the various types of computer systems found in a radiology department.
    9. Analyze national board review questions to prepare for the radiography examination.
    10. Survey all the advanced imaging modalities in the radiology profession.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pathology
    2. Patient care
    3. Imaging formations
    4. Analog vs digital
    5. Picture archiving and communication computer systems (PACS)
    6. Anatomy
    7. Physiology
    8. Imaging modalities
    9. Radiation biology
    10. Current digital imaging technologies
    11. Processing images
    12. Quality control
    13. Radiographic positioning
    14. Trauma care
    15. Contrast agents
    16. Special procedure devices
    17. Seldinger Technique
    18. Operative C-ARM Procedures
    19. Image distortion
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate equipment, software and textbooks.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Information Literacy
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 218C - Radiologic Technology Clinical 4


    Credits: 8
    480 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: RAD 207  and RAD 208C  
    Co-requisites: RAD 217  

    Description
    This course is a continuation of the application and practice of the full spectrum of radiographic and fluoroscopic procedures. These are performed with direct supervision progressing to indirect supervision by a certified technologist and Radiologist. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students are charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Produce a full range of radiographs demonstrating human pathologies as requested by a radiologist.
    2. Produce written documentations in patient charts/records as assigned by clinical staff and radiologists.
    3. Manipulate technical factors to demonstrate pathologies utilizing analog, computer and digital radiology imaging systems.
    4. Survey by observation supplementary modalities for human pathology diagnosis and detection.
    5. Evaluate image formations necessary for each examination performed in a radiology department.
    6. Perform basic and complex density, contrast, detail and distortion imaging formulas.
    7. Capitalize on each assigned examination under supervision to demonstrate technical competency levels.
    8. Perform data functions by utilizing various types of computer systems found in a radiology department.
    9. Demonstrate competency of various equipment manipulations.
    10. Generate proper image formations as assigned by clinical staff and Radiologists.
    Listed Topics
    1. Pathology
    2. Advanced imaging formations
    3. Analog vs digital
    4. Anatomy
    5. Physiology
    6. Imaging modalities
    7. Technical competencies
    8. Process images
    9. Advanced patient positioning
    10. Patient care
    11. Quality control
    12. Trauma care
    13. Picture archiving and communication computer systems (PACS)
    14. Contrast agents
    15. Special procedure equipment
    16. Seldinger Technique
    17. Operative C-ARM Procedures
    18. Advanced patient protection
    Reference Materials
    RAD Clinical Handbook and Clinical Competency Evaluation Forms.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RAD 258C - Radiologic Technology Clinical 5


    Credits: 4
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: All academic and clinical program requirements.

     
    Description
    This course provides a continued opportunity for the student to perform all routine procedures and to gain experience in special techniques. The student rotates through specialty areas to observe practice in pediatrics, ultrasound, angiography and special computerized imaging studies. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. A pass grade is a requirement to be eligible to apply for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Examination in Radiography. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students are charged for radiation badges.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Produce a full range of radiographs demonstrating human pathologies as requested by a Radiologist under minimal supervision as required by the program and accrediting agencies.
    2. Manipulate technical factors to demonstrate pathologies utilizing analog, computer and digital radiology imaging systems under minimal supervision as required by the program and accrediting agencies.
    3. Document observations of how human pathology is detected by Radiologists and clinical staff by participating in supplementary imaging.
    4. Produce image formations necessary for each examination performed in a radiology department.
    5. Perform all basic and complex density, contrast, detail and distortion imaging formulas without assistance from clinical staff.
    6. Demonstrate final competencies by performing each ARRT Task Inventory objective assigned by clinical staff and Radiologists.
    7. Perform all basic and advanced data functions by utilizing various types of computer systems found in a radiology department.
    8. Manipulate all diagnostic radiology department equipment without assistance from clinical staff or Radiologists.
    9. Generate proper image formations as assigned by clinical staff and Radiologists.
    10. Produce well-written and formulated documentations in patient charts/records as assigned by clinical staff and Radiologists.

     Listed Topics

    1. Pathology
    2. Patient care
    3. Advanced imaging formations
    4. Analog vs digital
    5. Quality control
    6. Advanced patient positioning techniques
    7. Trauma care
    8. Picture archiving and communication computer systems (PACS)
    9. Anatomy
    10. Physiology
    11. Imaging modalities
    12. Advanced patient protection
    13. Contrast agents
    14. Special procedure devices
    15. Seldinger Technique
    16. Operative C-ARM Procedures
    17. Technical competencies
    18. ARRT Task Inventories
    Reference Materials
    RAD Clinical Handbook and Clinical Competency Evaluation Forms.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Information Literacy
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search



Real Estate

  
  • RLE 101 - Real Estate Fundamentals


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: RLE 102  

    Description
    The study of the language, principles and laws that govern the business of real estate. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of land, property and rights in realty and title and the means, methods and laws that govern these ideas.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define real estate terminology.
    2. Recognize property rights and surveys.
    3. Describe the laws that govern real estate.
    4. Evaluate land use controls.
    5. Compare the principles of contracts, taxes and liens.
    Listed Topics
    1. Real Property and the Law
    2. Control of Land Use and Development
    3. Legal Descriptions
    4. Interests in Real Estate
    5. Real Estate Ownership
    6. Landlord and Tenant Interests
    7. Area and Taxation Math
    8. Real Estate Taxes and Liens
    9. Real Estate Contracts, Titles and Title Records
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


  
  • RLE 102 - Real Estate Practice


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: RLE 101  

    Description
    An overview of real estate listing and selling procedures. Included is an in-depth study of all types of real estate financing, including FHA, VA, conventional, construction and special mortgages. Cooperatives, condominiums and other types of private and public funding and development techniques are evaluated.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the types of mortgages.
    2. Apply licensing and registration procedures.
    3. Describe brokerage and agency relationships.
    4. Analyze closing procedures with regard to real estate contracts.
    5. Successfully complete a practice Real Estate Licensing Exam.
    6. Pass Real Estate Salesperson licensing exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Real Estate Financing
    2. Licensing and Registration Acts
    3. Overview of Real Estate Business
    4. Brokerage and Agency and Agency Contracts
    5. Appraisals
    6. Financing and Closing the Real Estate Transaction
    7. Property Management
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 01/13/2005


    Course and Section Search


 

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