Apr 14, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Mechatronics

  
  • MEC 225 - Automated Equipment


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MEC 221  

     
    Description
    This course presents a survey of the types of equipment used in robotics and automation. Devices such as motors, servomotors, conveyors, sensors, mechanical linkages and end-of-arm tooling (EOAT) are studied through a series of hands-on exercises performed in the lab to understand their operation and develop troubleshooting techniques.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe coordinate systems, motion between points and compound movement.
    2. Use belts, conveyors, screws and gears to build a process.
    3. Utilize controls of a mechanical arm and EOAT.
    4. Document projects utilizing appropriate industry standards.
    5. Apply relevant theory style in the completion of a team project.
    6. Prioritize teamwork in projects.
    Listed Topics
    1. Robot geometrics
    2. Mechanical systems
    3. Application of EOAT
    4. Project preparation
    5. Documentation preparation
    6. Team projects
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/21/2016


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  • MEC 230 - Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MEC 208  

     
    Description
    This course builds on the topics covered in MEC 208  Programmable Logic Controllers 2 (PLC 2) through a series of hands-on exercises performed in the lab. Various types of PLC hardware will be utilized and interfaced with industrial-quality components.  Activities will focus on the fundamentals of a complete mechatronics system.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the components and programming of a production system model.
    2. Adjust basic components in a production system model.
    3. Modify the PLC program for a production system model.
    4. Troubleshoot the PLC program for a production system model.
    5. Operate a production system model.
    6. Maintain a production system model.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. Siemens PLC
    3. Pick and place feeding
    4. Gauging
    5. Indexing
    6. Sorting and queuing
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/21/2016


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  • MEC 240 - Advanced Electrical Circuits


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MEC 103  

     
    Description
    This course covers the analysis of single- and three-phase alternationg current (AC) circuits.  Capacitors, inductors, time constants, resonance, resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) circuits and simple filters are studied utilizing a hands-on
    approach.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the operation of an AC power supply system.
    2. Analyze complex circuits.
    3. Identify types and functions of capacitors and inductors in an AC circuit.
    4. Construct capacitive and inductive circuits and measure reactance.
    5. Compare the uses for inductors and capacitors in various industrial applications.
    6. Construct various types of filter networks and measure their outcomes.
    7. Utilize an oscilloscope to analyze and troubleshoot AC circuits.
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. Transformers
    3. Generators
    4. Capacitors
    5. Inductors
    6. Time constant
    7. High- and low-pass filters
    8. Digital multimeter
    9. Oscilloscope
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/21/2016


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  • MEC 245 - Industrial Electronics


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MEC 240  

     
    Description
    This course covers basic semiconductor operation focusing on setup and applications of diodes, transistors, rectifiers, filters and amplifiers. This is accomplished through a series of hands-on exercises performed in the lab.  Circuit analysis and troubleshooting techniques are also developed in the laboratory.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify solid-state devices.
    2. Employ the techniques and methods needed to build and operate rectifiers.
    3. Explain the operations of diodes and transistors in electronic circuits.
    4. Describe the operation of semiconductor devices.
    5. Select the appropriate test equipment to analyze circuit operation.
    6. Utilize appropriate troubleshooting techniques to evaluate circuit performance.
    7. Identify safe workplace practices.
    Listed Topics
    1. N-type and P-type materials
    2. P-N junction and biasing
    3. Diodes
    4. Bipolar junction transistors
    5. Common emitter amplifiers
    6. Common collector amplifiers
    7. Common base amplifiers
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/21/2016


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  • MEC 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Jacobs, Diane Date Approved: 09/25/2015


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Medical Assistant

  
  • MDA 103 - Medical Assisting Seminar


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Admission into the MDA program
    Co-requisites: MDA 106 , BIO 103 , MDA 107   

    Description
    This course introduces medical assisting as a profession including duties, personal characteristics, national certification and professionalism. Areas of concentration are the medical assistant’s role in specialized fields of medicine, effective communication with patients, medical law and ethics and the job search. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the completion of the course the student will be able to demonstrate compliance with all of the MAERB Core Curriculum objectives as follows:

    1.   MAERB Appendix B CORE Curriculum 2015 standards

    2.   Define the principles of self-boundaries V.C.11.

    3.   Define patient navigator V.C.12.

    4.   Describe the role of the medical assistant as a patient navigator V.C.13.

    5.   Discuss examples of diversity:

    • cultural V.C.18.a.
    • social V.C.18.b.
    • ethnic V.C.18.c.

    6.   Coach Patients regarding:

    • Office policies V.P.4.a.

    7.   Demonstrate the principles of self-boundaries V.A.2.

    8.   Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including:

    • gender V.A.3.a.
    • race V.A.3.b.
    • religion V.A.3.c.
    • age V.A.3.d.
    • economic status V.A.3.e.
    • appearance V.A.3.f.

    9.   Differentiate between scope of practice and standards of care for medical assistants X.C.1.

    10. Compare and contrast provider and medical assistant roles in terms of standard of care X.C.2.

    11. Describe components of the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA) X.C.3.

    12. Summarize the Patient Bill of Rights X.C.4. 

    13. Discuss licensure and certification as they apply to healthcare providers X.C.5.

    14. Compare criminal and civil law as they apply to the practicing medical assistant X.C.6.

    15. Define:

    • negligence X.C.7.a.
    • malpractice X.C.7.b.
    • statute of limitations X.C.7.c.
    • Good Samaritan Act X.C.7.d.
    • Uniform Anatomical Gift Act X.C.7.e
    • living will/advanced directives X.C.7.f.
    • medical durable power of attorney X.C.7.g.
    • Patient Self Determination Act (PSDA) X.C.7.h
    • risk management X.C.7.i.

    16. Describe the following types of insurance:

    • liability X.C.8.a.
    • professional (malpractice) X.C.8.b.
    • personal injury X.C.8.c.

    17. List and discuss legal and illegal applicant interview questions X.C.9.

    18. Identify:

    • Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act X.C.10.a. 
    • Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) X.C.10.b.
    • Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) X.C.10.c.

    19. Describe the process in compliance reporting:

    • unsafe activities X.C.11.a.
    • errors in patient care X.C.11.b.
    • conflicts of interest X.C.11.c.
    • incident reports X.C.11.d.

    20. Describe compliance with public health statutes:

    • communicable diseases X.C.12.a.
    • abuse, neglect and exploitation X.C.12.b.
    • wounds of violence X.C.12.c.

    21. Define the following medical legal terms:

    •  informed consent X.C.13.a.
    •  implied consent X.C.13.b.
    •  expressed consent X.C.13.c.
    •  patient incompetence X.C.13.d.
    •  emancipated minor X.C.13.e.
    •  mature minor X.C.13.f.
    •  subpoena duces tecum X.C.13.g.
    •  respondent superior X.C.13.h.
    •  res ipsa loquitor X.C.13.i.
    •  locum tenens X.C.13.j.
    •  defendant-plaintiff X.C.13.k.
    •  deposition X.C.13.l.
    •  arbitration-mediation X.C.13.m.
    •  Good Samaritan laws X.C.13.n.

    22. Apply HIPAA rules in regard to:

    • privacy X.P.2.a.
    • release of information X.P.2.b.

    23. Apply the Patient’s Bill of Rights as it relates to:

    • choice of treatment X.P.4.a.
    • consent for treatment X.P.4.b.
    • refusal of treatment X.P.4.c.

    24. Perform compliance reporting based on public health statutes X.P.5. 

    25. Report an illegal activity in the healthcare setting following proper protocol X.P.6.

    26. Complete an incident report related to an error in patient care X.P.7. 

    27. Demonstrate sensitivity to patient rights X.A.1.

    28. Define:

    • Ethics XI.C.1.a.
    • Morals XI.C.1.b.

    29. Differentiate between personal and professional ethics XI.C.2

    30. Identify the effect of personal morals on professional performance XI.C.3

    31. Develop a plan for separation of personal and professional ethics XI.P.1

    32. Demonstrate appropriate response to ethical issues XI.P.2.

    33. Recognize the impact personal ethics and morals have on the delivery of healthcare XI.A.1

     Listed Topics

    1. Medical law and ethics
    2. Personal characteristics for professionalism
    3. National certification
    4. Resume writing
    5. Job Search
    6. Employment opportunities
    7. Ethical and legal responsibilities
    8. Professional liability
    9. Consent
    10. Compliance reporting
    11. Office and interpersonal relationships
    12. Practice marketing
    13. Supervision and human resources
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet, lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citzenship
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


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  • MDA 104 - Administrative Office Management


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the MDA Program
    Co-requisites: ALH 140 MDA 105 , MDA 208 , CIT 100  

    Description
    This course introduces the Medical Assisting profession and the healthcare team. Areas of concentration focus on technology and written communication, telephone techniques, scheduling appointments, patient processing, daily operations in the ambulatory care setting and the health record. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the completion of the course the student will be able to demonstrate compliance with all of the MAERB Core Curriculum objectives as follows:

    1.   MAERB Appendix B  CORE Curriculum 2015 standards

    2.   Identify styles and types of verbal communication V.C.1.

    3.   Identify types of nonverbal communication V.C.2.

    4.   Recognize barriers to communication V.C.3.

    5.   Identify techniques for overcoming communication barriers V.C.4.

    6.   Recognize the elements of oral communication using a sender-receiver process V.C.5.

    7.   Define coaching a patient as it relates to:

    • health maintenance V.C.6.a.
    • compliance with treatment V.C.6.c.
    • community resources    V.C.6.d.
    • adaptations relevant to individual patient V.C.6.e.

    8.   Recognize elements of fundamental writing skills V.C.7.

    9.   Discuss applications of electronic technology in professional communication V.C.8.

    10. Discuss the theories of:

    • Maslow V.C.17.a.

    11. Discuss examples of diversity:

    • cultural V.C.18.a.
    • social V.C.18.b.
    • ethnic V.C.18.c.

    12. Use feedback techniques to obtain patient information including:

    • reflection V.P.1.a.
    • restatement V.P.1.b.
    • clarification V.P.1.c.

    13. Respond to nonverbal communication V.P.2.

    14. Use medical terminology correctly and pronounced accurately to communicate information to providers and patients V.P.3.

    15. Coach patients regarding:

    • office policies V.P.4.a.
    • health maintenance V.P.4.b.
    • disease prevention V.P.4.c.
    • treatment plans V.P.4.d.

    16. Coach patients appropriately considering:

    • cultural diversity V.P.5.a.
    • developmental life stage V.P.5.b.
    • communication barriers V.P.5.c.

    17. Demonstrate professional telephone techniques V.P.6.

    18. Document telephone messages accurately V.P.7.

    19. Compose professional correspondence utilizing electronic technology V.P.8.

    20. Report relevant information concisely and accurately V.P.11.

    21. Demonstrate:

    •  empathy V.A.1.a.
    •  active listening V.A.1.b.
    •  nonverbal communication V.A.1.c.

    22. Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including:

    •  gender V.A.3.a.
    •  race V.A.3.b.
    •  religion V.A.3.c.
    •  age V.A.3.d.
    •  economic status V.A.3.e.
    •  appearance V.A.3.f.

    23. Explain to a patient the rationale for performance of a procedure V.A.4.

    24. Identify different types of appointment scheduling methods VI.C.1.

    25. Identify advantages and disadvantages of the following appointment systems 

    • Manual VI.C.2.a.
    • Electronic VI.C.2.b.

    26. Identify critical information required for scheduling patient procedures VI.C.3.

    27. Define types of information contained in the patient’s medical record VI.C.4.

    28. Identify methods of organizing the patient’s medical record based on:

    • Problem-oriented medical record (POMR) VI.C.5.a.
    • Source-oriented medical record (SOMR) VI.C.5.b.

    29. Identify equipment and supplies needed for medical records in order to :

    • Create VI.C.6.a. 
    • Maintain VI.C.6.b.
    • Store VI.C.6.c.

    30. Describe filing indexing rules VI.C.7.

    31. Differentiate between electronic medical records (EMR) and a practice management system VI.C.8.

    32. Explain the purpose of routine maintenance of administrative and clinical equipment VI.C.9.

    33. List steps involved in completing an inventory VI.C.10.

    34. Explain the importance of data back-up VI.C.11.

    35. Explain meaningful use as it applies to EMR VI.C.12.

    36. Manage appointment schedule using established priorities VI.P.1.

    37. Schedule a patient procedure VI.P.2.

    38. Create a patient’s medical record VI.P.3.

    39. Organize a patient’s medical record VI.P.4.

    40. File patient medical records VI.P.5.

    41. Utilize an EMR VI.P.6.

    42. Input patient data utilizing a practice management system VI.P.7.

    43. Perform routine maintenance of administrative or clinical equipment VI.P.8.

    44. Perform an inventory with documentation VI.P.9.

    45. Display sensitivity when managing appointments VI.A.1.

    46. Differentiate between scope of practice and standards of care for medical assistants X.C.1.

    47. Compare and contrast provider and medical assistant roles in terms of standard of care X.C.2

    48. Locate a state’s legal scope of practice for medical assistants X.P.1.

    49. Protect the integrity of the medical record X.A.2..

    50. Use proper body mechanics XII.P.3.

     Listed Topics

    1. Brief history of medicine
    2. Medical specialties and the health team
    3. Oral and written communication
    4. Scheduling appointments
    5. Receiving and sending office communications
    6. Managing office communication
    7. Patient records and filing
    8. Opening and closing the office
    9. Safety, security and emergency plans in the medical office
    10. Body mechanics
    11. General management duties
    12. Data management using electronic medical records (EMR)
    13. Equipment maintenance
    14. Inventory of supplies
    15. Services provided by the Unitaed States Postal Service
    16. The Medical Assistant job description
    17. Local, state and federal ligislation and regulation in the medical office settng
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet, and lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


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  • MDA 105 - Clinical Medical Assisting 1


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Admission into the Medical Assistant Program
    Co-requisites: ALH 140 , CIT 100 , MDA 104  and MDA 208  

    Description
    This course provides the medical assistant student knowledge, behaviors and skills usedin the medical office to assist the physician to provide patient care. Areas of concentration include structural organization of the body, orientation to clinical medical assisting, infection control, preparing patients for the physical exam, minor surgery, structure of the heart and performing EKG’s, understanding emergency procedures, performing patient assessment, providing patient education, understanding the basics of nutrition, performing vital signs and understanding diagnostic testing. Laboratory time is included for skills competency. Additional hours of practice time under the direct supervision of an instructor are provided.
    This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the completion of the course the student will be able to demonstrate compliance with all of the MAERB Core Curriculum objectives as follows:

    1.   MAERB Appendix B CORE Curriculum 2015 standards

    2.   Describe structural organization of the human body I.C.1.

    3.   Identify body systems I.C.2.

    4.   Describe

    • body planes I.C.3.a.
    • directional terms I.C.3.b.
    • quadrants I.C.3.c.
    • body cavities I.C.3.d.

    5.   List major organs in each body system I.C.4.

    6.   Identify the anatomical location of major organs in each body system I.C.5.

    7.   Compare structure and function of the human body across the life span I.C.6.

    8.   Describe the normal function of each body system I.C.7.

    9.   Identify common pathology related to each body system including:

    • signs I.C.8.a.
    • symptoms I.C.8.b.
    • etiology I.C.8.c.

    10. Analyze pathology for each body system including:

    • diagnostic measures I.C.9.a.
    • treatment modalities I.C.9.b.

    11. Describe basic principles of first aid as they pertain to the ambulatory healthcare setting I.C.14.

    12. Measure and record

    • blood pressure I.P.1.a.
    • temperature I.P.1.b.
    • pulse I.P.1.c.
    • respirations I.P.1.d.
    • height I.P.1.e.
    • weight I.P.1.f.

    13. Perform:

    • electrocardiography I.P.2.a.

    14. Perform patient screening using established protocols I.P.3.

    15. Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or a treatment I.P.8.

    16. Assist provider with a patient exam I.P.9.

    17. Perform first aid procedures for:

    • bleeding I.P.13.a.
    • diabetic coma or insulin shock I.P.13.b.
    • fractures I.P.13.c.
    • seizures I.P.13.d.
    • shock I.P.13.e.
    • syncope I.P.13.f.

    18. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment I.A.1.

    19. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care I.A.2.

    20. Show awareness of a patient’s concerns related to the procedure being performed I.A.3.

    21. List major types of infectious agents III.C.1.

    22. Describe the infection cycle including: 

    • The infectious agent III.C.2.a.
    • Reservoir III.C.2.b.
    • Susceptible host III.C.2.c.
    • Means of transmission III.C.2.d.
    • Portals of entry III.C.2.e.
    • Portals of exit III.C.2.f.

    23.Define the following as practiced within an ambulatory care setting:

    • Medical asepsis III.C.3.a.
    • Surgical asepsis III.C.3.b.

    24. Identify methods of controlling the growth of microorganisms III.C.4.

    25. Define the principles of standard precautions III.C.5.

    26. Define personal protective equipment (PPE) for:

    •  All body fluids, secretions and excretions   
    •  III.C.6.a.
    •  Blood III.C.6.b.
    •  Non-intact skin III.C.6.c.
    •  Mucous membranes III.C.6.d.

    28. Identify Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulations that impact healthcare practices III.C.7.

    29. Participate in bloodborne pathogen training III.P.1.

    30. Select appropriate barrier/Personal protective equipment (PPE) III.P.2.

    31. Perform Handwashing III.P.3.

    32. Perform autoclaving III.P.4.

    33. Perform sterilization procedures III.P.5.

    34. Prepare a sterile field III.P.6.

    35. Perform within a sterile field III.P.7.

    36. Perform wound care III.P.8.

    37. Perform a dressing change III.P.9.

    38. Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material:

    • Sharps III.P.10.a.
    • Regulated waste III.P.10.b.

    39. Recognize the implications for failure to comply with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulations in heathcare settings III.A.1.

    40. Describe dietary nutrients including:

    • Carbohydrates IV.C.1.a.
    • Fat IV.C.1.b.
    • Protein IV.C.1.c.
    • Minerals IV.C.1.d.
    • Electrolytes IV.C.1.e.
    • Vitamins IV.C.1.f.
    • Fiber IV.C.1.g.
    • Water IV.C.1.h.

    41. Define the function of dietary supplements IV.C.2.

    42. Identify the special dietary needs for:

    • Weight control IV.C.3.a.
    • Diabetes IV.C.3.b.
    • Cardiovascular disease IV.C.3.c.
    • Hypertension IV.C.3.d.
    • Cancer IV.C.3.e.
    • Lactose sensitivitiy IV.C.3.f.
    • Gluten-free IV.C.3.g.
    • Food allergies IV.C.3.h.

    43. Show awareness of patient’s concerns regarding dietary changes IV.A1.

    44. Instruct a patient according to patient’s special dietary needs IV.P.1.

    45. Define coaching a patient as it relates to:

    • health maintenance V.C.6.a.
    • disease prevention V.C.6.b.
    • community resources V.C.6.c.
    • adaptations relevant to individual patient needs V.C.6.d.

    46. Identify medical term labeling the word parts V.C.9.

    47. Define medical terms and abbreviations related to all body systems V.C.10.

    48. Relate the following behaviors to professional communication:

    • assertive V.C.14.a.
    • aggressive V.C.14.b.
    • passive V.C.14.c.

    49. Differentiate between adaptive and non-adaptive coping mechanisms V.C.15.

    50. Differentiate between subjective and objective information V.C.16.

    51. Discuss the theories of:

    • Kubler-Ross V.C.17.c.

    52. Respond to nonverbal communication V.P.2.

    53. Use medical terminology correctly and pronounced accurately to communicate information to providers and patients V.P.3.
    54. Coach patients regarding:

    • health maintenance V.P.4.b.
    • disease prevention V.P.4.c.
    • treatment plan V.P.4.d.

    55. Develop a current list of community resources related to patients’ healthcare needs V.P.9.

    56. Facilitate referrals to community resources in the role of a patient navigator V.P.10.

    57. Demonstrate empathy, active listening and nonverbal communication V.A.1.

    58. Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including:

    • gender V.A.3.a.
    • race V.A.3.b.
    • religion V.A.3.c.
    • age V.A.3.d.
    • economic status V.A.3.e.
    • appearance V.A.3.f.

    59. Explain to a patient the rationale for performance of a procedure V.A.4.

    60. Document patient care accurately in the medical record. X.P.3.

    61. Perform Compliance reporting based on public health X.P.5.

    62. Protect the integrity of the medical record X.A.2.

    63. Identify:

    • Safety signs XII.C.1.a.
    • Symbols XII.C.1.b.
    • Labels XII.C.1.c.

    64. Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to accidental exposure to:

    • Blood XII.C.2.a.
    • Other body fluids XII.C.2.b.
    • Needle sticks XII.C.2.c.
    • Chemicals XII.C.2.d.

    65. Discuss fire safety issues in an ambulatory healthcare environment XII.C.3.

    66. Describe fundamental principles for evacuation of a healthcare setting XII.C.4.

    67. Describe the purpose of Safety Data Sheets (SDS) in a healthcare setting XII.C.5.

    68. Discuss protocols for disposal of biological chemical materials XII.C.6.

    69. Identify principles of:

    • Body mechanics XII.C.7.a.

    70. Identify critical elements of an emergency plan for response to a natural disaster or other emergency XII.C.8.

    71. Comply with:

    • Safety signs XII.P.1.a.
    • Symbols XII.P.1.b.
    • labels XII.P.1.c.

    72. Demonstrate proper use of:

    • eyewash equipment XII.P.2.a.
    • fire extinguishers XII.P.2.b.
    • Sharps disposal containers XII.P.2.c.

    73. Use proper body mechanics XII.P.3.

    74. Participate in a mock exposure event with documentation of specific steps XII.P.4.

    75. Evaluate the work environment to identify unsafe working conditions XII.P.5.

    76. Recognize the physical and emotional effects on persons involved in an emergency situation XII.A.1.

    77. Demonstrate self-awareness in responding to an emergency situation XII.A.2.

     Listed Topics

    1. Normal functions of each body system
    2. Orientation to clinical medical assisting
    3. Guidelines for personal safety and well-being of staff and patients
    4. Diagnostic testing
    5. Infection Control
    6. Positioning and draping of patients for examinations
    7. Patient assessment
    8. Medical and surgical asepsis used in medical offices
    9. Center for Disease Control (CDC) regulation for the medical office
    10. Verbal and non-verbal communication skills
    11. Cardiography diagnostic testing
    12. Normal and abnormal vital signs for all age groups
    13. Nutrition
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet, lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDA 106 - Clinical Medical Assisting 2


    Credits: 5
    4 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MDA 105  
    Co-requisites: MDA 103 MDA 107 , BIO 103  

    Description
    This course provides the medical assistant student with knowledge, behaviors and skills used in the medical office to assist the physician to provide patient care. Areas of concentration include medication administration, immunization records and assisting in a wide variety of specialty offices. Laboratory time is included for skills competency. Additional hours of practice time under the direct supervision of an instructor are provided. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the completion of the course the student will be able to demonstrate compliance with all of the MAERB Core Curriculum objectives as follows:

    1.   MAERB Appendix B CORE Curriculum 2015 standards

    2.   List major organs in each body system I.C.4.

    3.   Identify the anatomical location of major organs in each body system I.C.5.

    4.   Compare structure and function of the human body across the life span I.C.6.

    5.   Describe the normal function of each body system I.C.7.

    6.   Identify common pathology related to each body system including:

    • signs I.C.8.a.
    • symptoms I.C.8.b.
    • etiology I.C.8.c.

    7.   Analyze pathology for each body system including:

    • diagnostic measures I.C.9.a.
    • treatment modalities I.C.9.b.

    8.   Identify the classifications of medications including:

    • indications for use I.C.11.a.
    • desired effects I.C.11.b.
    • side effects I.C.11.c.
    • adverse reactions I.C.11.d.

    9.   Measure and record:

    • length (infant) I.P.1.g.
    • head circumference (infant) I.P.1.h.
    • pulse oximetry I.P.1.i.

    10. Perform:

    • pulmonary function testing I.P.2.d.

    11. Perform patient screening using established protocols I.P.3.

    12. Verify the rules of medication administration:

    • right patient I.P.4.a.
    • right medication I.P.4.b.
    • right dose I.P.4.c.
    • right route I.P.4.d.
    • right time I.P.4.e.
    • right documentation I.P.4.f.

    13. Select proper sites for administering parenteral medication I.P.5.

    14. Administer oral medications I.P.6.

    15. Administer parenteral (excluding IV) medications I.P.7.

    16. Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or a treatment I.P.8.

    17. Assist provider with a patient exam I.P.9.

    18. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment I.A.1.

    19. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care I.A.2.

    20. Show awareness of a patient’s concerns related to the procedure being performed I.A.3.

    21. Demonstrate knowledge of basic math computations II.C.1.

    22. Apply mathematical computations to solve equations II.C.2.

    23. Define basic units of measurement in:

    • The metric system II.C.3.a.
    • The household system II.C.3.b.

    24. Convert among measurement systems II.C.4.

    25. Identify abbreviations and symbols used in calculating medication dosages II.C.5.

    26. Analyze healthcare results as reported in:

    • graphs II.C.6.a.
    • tables II.C.6.b.

    27. Calculate proper dosages of medication for administration II.P.1.

    28. Document on a growth chart II.P.4.

    29. Discuss the theories of: 

    • Erikson V.C.17.b.

    30. Coach patients regarding:

    • health maintenance V.P.4.b.
    • disease prevention V.P.4.c.
    • treatment plan V.P.4.d.

    31. Coach patients appropriately considering:               

    • cultural diversity V.P.5.a.     
    • developmental life stage V.P.5.b.
    • communication barriers V.P.5.c.

    32. Explain to a patient the rationale for performance of a procedure V.A.4.

    33. Document patient care accurately in the medical record X.P.3.

    34. Protect the integrity of the medical record X.A.2.

     Listed Topics

    1. Classifications of medications, including desired effects, side effects and adverse reactions
    2. Relationship between anatomy and physiology of body systems and medications used for treatment for each
    3. Basic units of measurements including metric, apothecary and household systems
    4. Math computation
    5. Principles of Pharmacology
    6. Radiographic examinations
    7. Rehabilitation modalities
    8. Administering Medications
    9. Specialty practice patients
    10. Safety and proper use of ambulatory aids
    11. Allergy Testing
    12. Basic anatomy of systems
    13. Specialty practice exams
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet and lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDA 107 - Laboratory Procedures for the Medical Office


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ALH 140 , MDA 105   
    Co-requisites: MDA 106 , BIO 103 , MDA 103   

    Description
    This course provides the medical assistant student with knowledge, behaviors and skills used in the medical office laboratory. Areas of concentration include clinical chemistry, hematology, urinalysis, phlebotomy, quality assurance and specimen collection. Laboratory time is included for skills competency. Additional hours of practice time under the direct supervision of an instructor are provided. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the completion of the course the student will be able to demonstrate compliance with all of the MAERB Core Curriculum objectives as follows:

    1.   MAERB Appendix B CORE Curriculum 2015 standards

    2.   Describe the normal function of each body system I.C.7.

    3.   Identify common pathology related to each body system including:

    • signs I.C.8.a.
    • symptoms I.C.8.b.
    • etiology I.C.8.c.

    4.   Analyze pathology for each body system including:

    • diagnostic measures I.C.9.a.
    • treatment modalities I.C.9.b.

    5.   Identify CLIA waived tests associated with common diseases I.C.10.

    6.   Identify quality assurance practices in healthcare I.C.12.

    7.   Perform:

    • venipuncture I.P.2.b.
    • capillary puncture I.P.2.c.

    8.   Perform patient screening using established protocols I.P.3.

    9.   Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or a treatment I.P.8.

    10. Assist provider with a patient exam I.P.9.

    11. Perform quality control measure I.P.10.

    12. Obtain specimens and perform:

    • CLIA waived hematology test I.P.11.a.
    • CLIA waived chemistry test I.P.11.b.
    • CLIA waived urinalysis test I.P.11c.
    • CLIA waived immunology test I.P.11.d.
    • CLIA waived microbiology test I.P.11.e.

    13. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment I.A.1.

    14. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care I.A.2.

    15. Show awareness to the concerns related to the procedure being performed I.A.3.

    16. Analyze healthcare results as reported in:

    • graphs II.C.6.a.
    • tables II.C.6.b.

    17. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results II.P.2.

    18. Maintain lab test results using flow sheets II.P.3.

    19. Assure a patient of the accuracy of the test results II.A.1.

    20. List major types of infectious agents III.C.1.

    21. Describe the infection cycle including:

    • Infectious agent III.C.2.a.
    • Reservoir III.C.2.b.
    • Susceptible host III.C.2.c.
    • Means of transmission III.C.2.d.
    • Portals of entry III.C.2.e.
    • Portals of exit III.C.2.f.

    22. Identify methods of controlling the growth of microorganisms III.C.4.

    23. Define the principles of standard precautions III.C.5.

    24. Define personal protective equipment for:

    • All body fluids, secretions and  excretions III.C.6.a.
    • Blood III.C.6.b.
    • Non-intact skin III.C.6.c.
    • Mucous membranes III.C.6.d.

    25. Identify the Center for Disease Control regulation that impact healthcare practices III.C.7.

    26. Select appropriate barrier/PPE III.P.2.

    27. Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material:

    • Sharps III.P.10.a.
    • Regulated waste III.P.10.b.

    28. Explain the purpose of routine maintenance of administrative and clinical equipment VI.C.9.

    29. Perform routine maintenance of administrative or clinical equipment VI.P.8.

    30. Identify:

    • Safety signs XII.C.1.a.
    • Symbols XII.C.1.b.
    • Labels XII.C.1.c.

    31. Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to accidental exposure to :

    • Blood XII.C.2.a.
    • Other body fluids XII.C.2.b.
    • Needle sticks XII.C.2.c.
    • Chemicals XII.C.2.d.

    32. Comply with:

    • Safety signs XII.P.1.a.
    • Symbols XII.P.1.b.
    • Labels XII.P.1.c.

    33. Demonstrate proper use of:

    • Sharps disposal containers XII.P.2.a.

     Listed Topics

    1. Engineered safety devices
    2. Blood types
    3. Venipuncture
    4. Capillary puncture
    5. CLIA - waived tests in chemistry, hematology and urinalysis
    6. Routine maintenance of equipment
    7. Quality control
    8. Use of the microscope
    9. Microbiology testing
    10. Immunology tests
    11. Occult blood test
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet and lab equipment. 
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDA 108C - Medical Assisting Externship


    Credits: 3
    160 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites:  ALH 106 , ALH 140 BIO 103 , CIT 100  , MDA 103 , MDA 104 , MDA 105 , MDA 106 , MDA 107  and MDA 208  plus fullfillment of pre-externship requirements.

     
    Description
    This course is a supervised, non-paid 160 hour work experience in a private physician’s office or in a clinic. The student gains practical experience applying the knowledge, skills and behaviors learned in the Medical Assistant program to perform administrative, clinical and communication competencies. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prior to the externship current CPR, Criminal Record Clearance and PA Child Abuse Clearances (Act 33/34) and a physical examination are required. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform clinical procedures related to patient examinations and assist the physician throughout the exam.
    2. Prepare blood and body fluid specimens for analysis according to industry standards.
    3. Communicate effectively orally and in writing.
    4. Perform administrative functions related to medical business practices.
    5. Display behavior in accordance with regulations, policies, laws and patient rights.
    Listed Topics
    1. Administrative functions including receptionist duties, telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, patient records, office communication, medical financial management responsibilities and health insurance claims
    2. Patient care functions including preparation of the patient for physical examination, positioning and draping patient, vital signs, height and weight measurements, sterilization procedures, assistance with examinations, aseptic techniques, electrocardiography, oral medications, parenteral medications (excluding IV), x-rays and eye examinations
    3. Laboratory functions including laboratory organization, venipuncture, finger puncture, chemical examination of urine, microscopic examination of urine, stool examination for occult blood, CLIA waived tests, throat culture, mono spot test for mononucleasis, pregnancy test, quality control in the laboratory and laboratory safety
    4. Applied communication including styles and types of communication, telephone techniques, general office policies, coping mechanisms, culture and environmental, developmental life stage, language and physical barriers to communication
    5. Medical business practice functions including basic practice finances, basic bookkeeping computations, bank deposits, accounts receivable procedures and computerized office building systems
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet, and lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDA 208 - Medical Financial Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the MDA program
    Co-requisites:  ALH 140 , CIT 100 MDA 104 MDA 105 ,  

    Description
    This course introduces the knowledge, behavior and skills used by the medical assistant in the performance of medical business practices. Areas of concentration are basic bookkeeping computations, accounts receivable procedures, computerized office billing systems, managed-care insurance and procedural and diagnostic coding. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    At the completion of the course the student will be able to demonstrate compliance with all of the MAERB Core Curriculum objectives as follows:

    1.   MAERB Appendix B CORE Curriculum 2015 Standards

    2.   Demonstrate knowledge of basic math computations II.C.1.

    3.   Apply mathematical computations to solve equations II.C.2.

    4.   Define the following bookkeeping terms:

    • Charges VII.C.1.a.
    • Payments VII.C.1.b.
    • Accounts receivable VII.C.1.c.
    • Accounts payable VII.C.1.d.
    • Adjustments VII.C.1.e.

    5.   Describe banking procedures as related to the ambulatory care setting VII.C.2.

    6.   Identify precautions for accepting the following types of payments:

    • Cash VII.C.3.a.
    • Check VII.C.3.b.
    • Credit card VII.C.3.c.
    • Debit card VII.C.3.d.

    7.   Describe types of adjustments made to patient accounts including:

    • Non-sufficient funds (NSF) check VII.C.4.a.
    • Collection agency transaction VII.C.4.b.
    • Credit balance VII.C.4.c.
    • Third party VII.C.4.d.

    8.   Identify types of information contained in the patient’s billing record VII.C.5.

    9.   Explain patient financial obligations for services rendered VII.C.6.

    10. Perform accounts receivable procedures to patient accounts including posting:

    •  Charges VII.P.1.a.
    •  Payments VII.P.1.b.
    •  Adjustments VII.P.1.c.

    11. Prepare a bank deposit VII.P.2.

    12. Obtain accurate patient billing information VII.P.3.

    13. Inform a patient of financial obligations for services rendered VII.P.4.

    14. Demonstrate professionalism when discussing patient’s billing record VII.A.1.

    15. Display sensitivity when requesting payment for services rendered VII.A.2. 

    16. Identify:

    • Types of third party plans VIII.C.1.a.
    • Information required to file a third party claim VIII.C.1.b.
    • The steps for filing a third party claim VIII.C.1.c.

    17. Outline managed care requirements for patient referral VIII.C.2.

    18. Describe processes for:

    • Verification of eligibility for services VIII.C.3.a.
    • Precertification VIII.C.3.b.
    • Preauthorization VIII.C.3.c.

    19. Define a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) VIII.C.4.

    20. Differentiate between fraud and abuse VIII.C.5.

    21. Interpret information on an insurance card VIII.P.1.

    22. Verify eligibility for services including documentation VIII.P.2.

    23. Obtain precertification or preauthorization including documentation VIII.P.3.

    24. Complete an insurance claim form VIII.P.4.

    25. Interact professionally with third party representatives VIII.A.1.

    26. Display tactful behavior when communicating with medical providers regarding third party requirements VIII.A.2.

    27. Show sensitivity when communicating with patients regarding third party requirements VIII.A.3.

    28. Describe how to use the most current procedural coding system IX.C.1.

    29. Describe how to use the most current diagnostic coding classification system IX.C.2.

    30. Describe how to use the most current HCPCS level II coding system IX.C.3.

    31. Discuss the effects of:

    • upcoding IX.C.4.a.
    • downcoding IX.C.4.b.

    32. Define medical necessity as it applies to procedural and diagnostic coding IX.C.5.

    33. Perform procedural coding IX.P.1

    34. Perform diagnostic coding IX.P.2.

    35. Utilize medical necessity guidelines IX.P.3.

    36. Utilize tactful communication skills with medical providers to ensure accurate code selection IX.A.1.

     Listed Topics

    1. Medical care expenses
    2. Credit arrangements
    3. Bookkeeping procedures
    4. Computer billing
    5. Overdue payments
    6. Fundamentals of managed care
    7. Health care plans
    8. Preparing claims
    9. Professional manner and image
    10. Ethical principles
    11. Initiative and responsibility
    12. Demonstrate knowledge of basic math computation
    13. Adapting communication to the individual’s ability to understand
    14. Perform accounts receivable
    15. Obtain correct billing information
    16. Computer techniques to support office operations
    17. Confidentiality
    18. Federal, state and local legal guidelines
    19. Documentation
    20. Appropriate guidelines when releasing information
    21. Employer’s established policies dealing with the health care contract
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, audio, video, internet and lab equipment.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/27/2019


    Course and Section Search



Medical Insurance Specialist

  
  • MIS 100 - Intro Medical Insurance


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to introduce the students to the medical insurance billing profession. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge and skills essential for completing insurance claim forms in the health care setting. Attention is also focused on the various medical insurance plans offered by today’s health care payers. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Outline and describe the roles and responsibilities of the Medical Insurance Specialist.
    2. Define medical insurance terms and describe the development of the medical insurance industry.
    3. Differentiate between diagnostic and procedural coding and their relationship to insurance claims.
    4. Prepare accurate and complete insurance claim forms according to current insurance guidelines.
    5. Explain electronic claims submission and its importance in today’s insurance environment.
    6. Collect data from patient charts and distinguish between primary and secondary insurance plans.
    7. Identify, describe and explain the important federal, state and private medical insurance plans.
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical insurance/billing profession
    2. Medical insurance terminology
    3. Introduction to coding systems
    4. Insurance claim forms
    5. Medical insurance plans
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks, software packages, case studies, etc.
    Approved By: Flores, Roy Date Approved: 05/13/2002


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIS 101 - Principles Appl Medical Ins


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MDA 104  

     
    Description
    A study of medical insurance programs with emphasis on professional service and diagnostic coding. Topics include processing insurance claims, ICD-9-CM, CPT-4, diagnosis-related grougps, preferred provider programs, and computer -generated insurance claims. The principles of insurance and their applications to specific cases in a medical office and hospital billing department are examined. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Outline and describe the roles and responsibilities of the Medical Insurance Specialist.
    2. Define medical insurance terms and describe the development of the medical insurance industry.
    3. Differentiate between diagnostic and procedural coding and their relationship to insurance claims.
    4. Prepare accurate and complete insurance claim forms according to current insurance guidelines.
    5. Explain electronic claims submission and its importance in today’s insurance environment.
    6. Collect data from patient charts and distinguish between primary and secondary insurance plans.
    7. Identify, describe and explain the important federal, state and private medical insurance plans.
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical insurance/billing profession
    2. Medical insurance terminology
    3. Introduction to coding systems
    4. Insurance claim forms
    5. Medical insurance plans
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks, software packages, case studies, etc.
    Approved By: Kingsmore, John Date Approved: 01/13/1997


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIS 102 - Medical Coding for Insurance Billing


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ALH 140  and Acceptance into the MIS Program

     
    Description
    This course will present a comprehensive study of diagnostic and procedural medical coding for insurance billing utilizing the ICD and CPT classification systems. Application of these codes to medical insurance claims forms and their impact on proper reimbursement for health care services will be emphasized. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the content and arrangement of the major divisions of each volume of the ICD coding system.
    2. Interpret abbreviations, punctuations, symbols and other conventions and notations used in ICD.
    3. Analyze medical documentation to assign appropriate ICD codes for diagnoses.
    4. Apply coding principles of ICD to specific medical cases for adequate reimbursement.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of CPT guidelines as they pertain to the six major divisions of the CPT coding manual.
    6. Recognize the circumstances when CPT modifiers are used for maximal reimbursement.
    7. Interpret abbreviations and symbols used in CPT.
    8. Recognize the circumstances when HCPCS codes are used.
    9. Select appropriate CPT and HCPCS codes for procedures, services and supplies.
    10. Apply coding principles of CPT to specific medical cases for adequate reimbursement.
    Listed Topics
    1. ICD coding system
    2. CPT coding system
    3. HCPCS coding system
    4. Coding of medical insurance claim forms
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, workbooks, software packages, case studies, current ICD and CPT coding manuals, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIS 103 - Medical Insurance Seminar


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MIS 100  

     
    Description
    This course is designed to study the legal aspects of the medical office. Emphasis is placed on legal issues involving legal forms of consent, informed consent, DNR, living wills, the Red Flags Rule, HIPAA and OSHA regulations. Case studies involving false claims, Medicare/Medicaid regulations and compliance issues are analyzed. The topic of job readiness is covered including resume writing and interviewing techniques. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss issues related to professional ethics, fraud, abuse and compliance.
    2. Identify legal forms of consent and informed consent.
    3. Discuss the importance of HIPAA, the Red Flags Rule and OSHA as they pertain to the medical office.
    4. Discuss patient rights and responsibilities, DNR, Living Wills and end of life issues.
    5. Create an effective resume and cover letter.
    6. Describe the interview process including interview behavior and appearance.
    Listed Topics
    1. Current healthcare legal issues
    2. Compliance issues, professional ethics, fraud and abuse
    3. Fraudulent claims, bundling and unbundling coding issues
    4. Patient rights and responsibilities, DNR, Living Wills and end of life issues
    5. Legal consent, informed consent and abandonment
    6. HIPAA, Red Flags Rule and OSHA guidelines
    7. Job issues
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, handouts, guest speakers, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIS 105 - Medical Insurance Applications


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MIS 100  

     
    Description
    This course is designed to study the post-adjudication claims process including patient liability issues, bankruptcy and estate claims. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and skills essential to problem solving rejected or pended medical claims, false claims and Medicare/Medicaid regulation compliance. Case studies involving the Explanation of Benefits Summary are analyzed. Credit and collection laws as they pertain to patient liability situations will also be addressed. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Examine current healthcare business trends and healthcare systems.
    2. Analyze rejected medical insurance claims and effect a solution.
    3. Review Explanation of Benefits and formulate an effective appeal for reimbursement.
    4. Apply credit and collection laws to patient liability situations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Trends and issues in healthcare delivery systems and reimbursement issues
    2. Medical insurance claim monitoring and the adjudication process
    3. Explanation of Benefits
    4. Credit and collection laws, bankruptcy and estate claims
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, handouts, guest speakers, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search



Medical Laboratory Assistant

  
  • MLA 101 - Laboratory Specimen Processing


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ALH 140 , ENG 100  or ENG 101 , BIO 103  and MLT 111  
    Co-requisites: PHB 101   and PHB 111L  

    Description
    This course encompasses general specimen processing. Skills included are safety, routine laboratory tests, laboratory information systems, specimen accessioning, communication, distribution to in-house and reference laboratories and vital signs. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare blood and body fluid specimens for analysis.
    2. Prepare reagents, standards and controls.
    3. Perform appropriate tests at the medical laboratory assistant level.
    4. Identify proper safety practices for infection control.
    5. Verify accuracy and report potential pre-analytical errors that may occur during specimen collection, labeling, transporting and processing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Common medical terminology
    2. Quality Control
    3. Communication
    4. Test procedures
    5. Specimen accessioning
    6. Specimen acceptance and rejection
    7. Vital signs
    8. HIPAA
    9. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lectures and discussions, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLA 102C - Medical Lab Assistant Externship


    Credits: 4
    240 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Minimum of “C” grade in all program courses.

     
    Description
    This course offers practical experience in an affiliated clinical laboratory. Students perform routine specimen processing, accessioning and distribution. Laboratory information systems, communication and skills associated with phlebotomy and vital signs are included. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Verify accuracy of specimen collection and labeling.
    2. Verify accuracy of specimen transport and processing.
    3. Enter appropriate data into the Laboratory Information System (LIS).
    4. Prepare blood and body fluid specimens for analysis.
    5. Perform phlebotomy to required standards.
    Listed Topics
    1. Infection control and safety practices
    2. HIPAA
    3. Quality Control
    4. Reagents, standards and controls
    5. Laboratory Information System (LIS)
    6. Communication
    7. Specimen accessioning
    8. Appropriate testing in various laboratory departments
    9. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Laboratory specimens and materials, Laboratory Information System, discussion, handouts, laboratory procedure manuals, check sheets and performance evaluation sheets.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search



Medical Laboratory Technician

  
  • MLT 111 - Clinical Laboratory Techniques 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into MLT Program

     
    Description
    This course is an orientation to general laboratory practice, laboratory safety, venipuncture, capillary puncture and clinical urinalysis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform capillary puncture and explain the technique concept.
    2. Perform venipuncture and explain the technique concept.
    3. Perform all urinalysis laboratory test procedures with results and control values within acceptable manufacturer’s limits.
    4. Identify the importance of clinical urinalysis.
    5. Identify the importance of clinical phlebotomy.
    Listed Topics
    1. General laboratory safety and infection control in the clinical lab
    2. Controls, reference specimens and quality control
    3. Specimen collection and handling
    4. Capillary puncture
    5. Venipuncture
    6. Urinalysis
    7. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 112 - Clinical Laboratory Techniques 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MLT 111  

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to immunology (serology). Emphasis will be on normal and abnormal immune responses and how they are manifested in laboratory tests. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the principles of the immune system including immunoglobulins.
    2. Differentiate the types of immunity and Antigen-Antibody reactions.
    3. Explain hypersensitivity.
    4. Distinguish between the roles of B Lymphocytes, T Lymphocytes and Natural Killer Lymphocytes.
    5. Explain various immunology and serology testing principles and procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Immunity
    2. Body’s lines of defense
    3. Different types of antigens and immunoglobulins
    4. Complement
    5. Routine vaccinations
    6. Hypersensitivity and anaphylactic response
    7. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 151 - Clinical Microbiology 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MLT 111  

     
    Description
    This course focuses on the identification of parasites and fungi (pathogens and common non-pathogens associated with human disease). This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify parasites of clinical importance.
    2. Identify fungi of clinical importance.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in all laboratory exercises by correct identification of organisms.
    4. Explain and discuss aspects of clinical microbiology as it relates to parasites and fungi.
    5. Discuss clinical importance of pathogenic parasites and fungi.
    Listed Topics
    1. Classification of parasites and host/parasite relationship
    2. Collection and processing of specimens
    3. Protozoa
    4. Digenea
    5. Cestoda
    6. Nematoda
    7. Arthropoda
    8. Fungal contaminants
    9. Yeast
    10. Dermatophytes and superficial fungi
    11. Subcutaneous and dimorphic fungi
    12. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 152 - Clinical Microbiology 2


    Credits: 5
    3 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MLT 151  

     
    Description
    This course focuses on the isolation and identification of microorganisms causing disease (pathogens). Topics include microbes, specimen collection, normal flora, characterization of specific pathogens, biochemical tests, susceptibility testing and determining the pathogenicity of organisms. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Outline the basic concepts of general microbiology.
    2. Perform tests and identify clinically important bacteria.
    3. Explain the clinical importance of pathogenic microbes.
    4. Identify organisms in all laboratory exercises.
    5. Explain the importance of clinical microbiology.
    Listed Topics
    1. General microbiology, bacterial cell structure, metabolism and physiology
    2. Infectious disease process
    3. Normal flora and quality control
    4. Safety in the microbiology laboratory, infection control
    5. Pathogenic bacteria
    6. Collection of specimens and susceptibility testing
    7. Miscellaneous organisms
    8. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook reading assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, handouts, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 161 - Clinical Instrumentation and Clinical Chemistry 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into MLT Program

     
    Description
    This course covers quality control in the laboratory, the pathophysiology of disease of major body systems, body fluids, organic derivatives and clinical chemistry techniques. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the principles and procedures in Clinical Chemistry to include: Quality Control, automation and instrumentation, electrolytes, acid-base physiology and trace elements.
    2. Assess the relationship among the laboratory procedures, results, chemical reactions, chemical reagents, normal and abnormal results, diagnostic values of laboratory tests and the physiological changes in the patient.
    3. Compare the unique chemical and physical properties of the major organic derivatives and identify functional organic groups.
    4. Explain the testing of various body fluids.
    5. Relate the principles of quality control and statistics to the laboratory.
    Listed Topics
    1. Laboratory safety
    2. Quality control, normal ranges and values
    3. Spectrophometry and laboratory analyzers
    4. Analytical error
    5. Atomic absorption
    6. Fluorometric procedures
    7. Potentiometric measurement systems
    8. RIA
    9. Fluid balance and electrolytes
    10. Chemistry departments
    11. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 162 - Clinical Chemistry 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MLT 111  and MLT 161  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of Clinical Instrumentation and Clinical Chemistry 1 (MLT 161 ). Topics include electrophoresis and errors in biochemical metabolism with an emphasis on clinical assays for proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and toxins. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List and identify the trace elements and their importance to homeostasis and the classification of toxic materials and the analysis of each.
    2. Compare protein and amino acid structures, functions, classification, methods of analysis and clinical usage of enzymes; non protein nitrogen products and their fluctuations in disease states.
    3. Compare and contrast the functions of the liver and the disease states of the liver; carbohydrate utilization, analysis and disease states; enzyme function, analysis and disease states.
    4. Explain the endocrine system including the importance of hormones in homeostasis and disease states.
    5. Compare lipid structure, metabolism, function and methods of analysis.
    Listed Topics
    1. Laboratory safety
    2. Inorganic compounds
    3. Animo acids and proteins
    4. Enzymes
    5. Liver metabolism
    6. Glucose
    7. Lipids
    8. Pharmakinetics
    9. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 220 - Clinical Hematology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MLT 111  

     
    Description
    This course focuses on the formation and maturation of blood cells, hemostasis, laboratory hematologic techniques and hematologic disorders. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain and discuss hematology topics presented in lecture and lab.
    2. List normal values and units of measurement for procedures studied.
    3. Explain the operation and functions of hematology analyzers discussed in class.
    4. Perform lab tests utilizing controls, references and unknown specimens.
    5. Explain the effects of medications, specimen collection and handling on lab test results.
    Listed Topics
    1. Components of blood
    2. Erythrocyte morphology, metabolism and tests
    3. Hemoglobin and hematocrit
    4. Erythrocyte disorders
    5. Automated hematology instrumentation
    6. Leukocyte morphology, metabolism and tests
    7. Leukocyte disorders
    8. Myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders
    9. Hemostasis
    10. Hemostasis disorders
    11. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 225 - Clinical Immunohematology


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MLT 112  

     
    Description
    This course covers transfusion medicine. Topics include the human blood groups, compatibility testing and blood component therapy. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform front and reverse ABO typings on blood and interpret the results within AABB standards.
    2. Perform Rh typings on blood and interpret the results within AABB standards.
    3. Perform direct antiglobulin testing. Distinguish between monospecific and polyspecific antiglobulin sera. Discuss principles, applications and sources of error.
    4. Perform antibody screening within AABB standards. Explain the purpose, principles and sources of error.
    5. Define compatibility testing (cross matching). Perform a major cross match.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hazards and safety in the blood bank
    2. Blood bank genetics
    3. ABO groups
    4. Rh groups
    5. Miscellaneous blood groups
    6. HDN
    7. Donor selection and transfusion therapy
    8. Compatibility testing
    9. Professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, textbook assignments, audiovisual methods, laboratory exercises, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 250 - Clinical Laboratory Seminar


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Grade “C” or better in all MLT courses
    Co-requisites: MLT 251C  

    Description
    This course reviews medical laboratory professionalism, diversity, successful employment and current laboratory trends. The student receives a comprehensive certification board exam review. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the medical laboratory gained through guest speakers and analyze various roles of the MLT through role play.
    2. Explain and differentiate the various roles of the medical profession gained through guest speakers and other media.
    3. Present clinical reports on updated material.
    4. Explain professionalism, ethics, hospital organization, certification and other areas pertinent to the profession.
    5. Support the role of the clinical laboratory within the health system.
    Listed Topics
    1. How to meet customer/patient needs by the highest quality methods
    2. The four rules of perfecting patient care
    3. PRHI as a resource in the local/regional healthcare community
    4. The 5S system
    5. 4M’s (mankind, machine, materials and methods) in producing customers/patients needs in laboratory testing
    6. Ethical decisions, professionalism
    7. Legal issues
    8. HIPAA
    9. Interviews and resumes
    10. Staying current in the field of laboratory medicine
    11. Technical training methodologies
    Reference Materials
    Lecture and discussion, audiovisual methods, guest speakers, student role play, student reports, practice certification exams, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MLT 251C - Clinical Laboratory Externship


    Credits: 12
    620 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Grade “C” or better in all MLT courses
    Co-requisites: MLT 250  

    Description
    This course offers practical experience in an affiliated laboratory. Students rotate through laboratory sections and observe and perform routine lab test. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Correlate didactic and classroom laboratory experience with actual clinical work.
    2. Perform tests and identify clinically important results under the supervision of externship preceptors.
    3. Explain and correlate the importance of normal and abnormal lab results with externship preceptor.
    4. Interact professionally with hospitalized patients and outpatients.
    5. Correlate abnormal laboratory results with clinical pathological signs and symptoms.
    6. Perform test procedures with results and control values within acceptable manufacturer’s limits.
    7. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior and responsibility to the patient and the profession.
    Listed Topics
    1. Hematology
    2. Immunohematology (blood bank)
    3. Immunology (serology)
    4. Microbiology
    5. Urinalysis
    6. Chemistry
    7. Phlebotomy
    Reference Materials
    Observation and performance of clinical laboratory tests.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/15/2010


    Course and Section Search



Medical Records

  
  • MDR 100 - Introduction to Health Data Content & Structure


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Health Information Technology Program

     
    Description
    This course presents an introduction to the health information management profession and the health record. Some of the topics included are health data structure, content and standards; health information department functions; healthcare delivery systems; and data storage, retrieval and retention. Information presented will include paper, hybrid and electronic health records. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the roles and functions of a health information management (HIM) department and HIM professionals.
    2. Differentiate the roles of the various providers and disciplines throughout the continuum of healthcare services.
    3. Identify the purpose, use and documentation requirements for customary reports contained within the health record.
    4. Verify timeliness, completeness, accuracy and appropriateness of health data in the patient record.
    5. Examine and develop health record data collection tools.
    6. Determine storage, retention and destruction policies for health information.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to the HIM profession and HIM functions
    2. Healthcare delivery systems
    3. Purpose, function and users of the health record
    4. Content, structure and standards of the health record
    5. Health record data collection tools
    6. Document archival, retrieval and imaging systems
    7. Emerging technologies and initiatives in the HIM field
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, workbooks, internet sites, software packages, health records, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 102 - Inpatient Clinical Coding & Secondary Records


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 100  and ALH 140  

     
    Description
    This course includes the historical development of medical nomenclatures and clinical classification systems and their use in healthcare documentation, statistics, research, education and financial reimbursement through the prospective payment system. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) classification system in the inpatient setting is emphasized. Secondary databases such as patient registries and clinical indices are presented as data sources in the health care setting. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply diagnosis and procedure codes using the ICD classification system.
    2. Utilize current regulations and established guidelines in code assignments.
    3. Validate coding and sequencing accuracy using clinical information found in the health record.
    4. Determine accuracy of diagnostic groupings such as Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG) in the prospective payment system.
    5. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding.
    6. Collect and maintain secondary databases to meet specific organization needs such as clinical indices and patient registries used in medical research.
    Listed Topics
    1. Medical nomenclatures
    2. Clinical classification systems
    3. Inpatient clinical coding with the international classification of diseases
    4. Diagnosis related group assignment
    5. Secondary databases
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, workbook, internet sites, software packages, health records and current coding book, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 103 - Healthcare Statistics


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 100 , CIT 100 , Math Elective

     
    Description
    This course will present an introduction to the basic and most frequently used health care statistics. Students will learn terms, definitions and formulas used in computing health care statistics. Other topics inlude data presentation, report generation and information on the collection, preparation and use of vital statistics. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Comprehend basic descriptive statistics.
    2. Calculate and interpret basic healthcare institutional statistics.
    3. Prepare vital records such as birth, death and fetal death certificates.
    4. Collect, organize and present healthcare data.
    5. Use common software packages for data presentation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Healthcare institutional statistics
    2. Descriptive statistics
    3. Vital statistics
    4. Data presentation
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, software packages, various internet sites, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 202C - Health Information Technology Direct Practice 1


    Credits: 3
    120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 100  
    Co-requisites: MDR 102  

    Description
    This course is designed to provide and place emphasis on supervised clinical practice sessions in health information technology.  Analyzing, storing and retrieving information from a variety of formats, abstracting, coding and Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) assignment, releasing information and maintaining patient registries are put into practice.  The planning and organization aspects of the hospital and Health Information Management Department are experienced during these practice sessions. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze health records to verify the timeliness, completeness, accuracy and appropriateness of documentation.
    2. Collect and report data on incomplete records and timeliness of record completion.
    3. Abstract and maintain data for clinical indicies, databases and registries.
    4. Apply diagnosis/procedure codes adhering to current regulations and established guidelines.
    5. Apply policy and procedures for optimizing and assigning the appropriate DRGs for hospital reimbursement.
    6. Use appropriate manual, electronic or imaging technology for data storage and retrieval.
    7. Apply policies and procedures for access and disclosure of health information.
    8. Apply confidentiality and security measures to protect health information.
    Listed Topics
    1. Record analysis
    2. Record abstracting
    3. Inpatient coding and diagnosis related group assignment
    4. Patient registries (cancer, trauma, etc.)
    5. Data storage and retrieval
    6. Confidentiality, security and release of health information

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 203C - Health Information Technology Directed Practice 2


    Credits: 3
    120 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 202C  

     
    Description
    This course is designed to provide experience in the field of health information in health care facilities and in a simulated laboratory setting. Analyzing, coding, abstracting and patient registries are re-emphasized. The planning and organizing aspects of the Health Information Management Department are experienced during the time of these practice sessions. Students are responsible for providing and paying for transportation to all clinical sites as well as all other related costs. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze health records to verify the timeliness, completeness, accuracy and appropriateness of documentation.
    2. Abstract and maintain data for clinical indices, databases and registries.
    3. Apply diagnosis/procedure codes adhering to current regulations and established guidelines.
    4. Apply policies and procedures for optimizing and assigning the appropriate Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs) and Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs) for hospital reimbursement.
    Listed Topics
    1. Record analysis
    2. Record abstracting and data reporting
    3. Inpatient coding and DRG assignment
    4. Outpatient coding and ambulatory payment classification assignment
    5. Patient registries (cancer, trauma, etc.)
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, workbook, software packages, health records, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 206 - Legal Aspects of Health Information


    Credits: 2
    1 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 100  

     
    Description
    This course presents a comprehensive study of the legal aspects of health records and health information. Topics include an introduction to the fundamentals of law and the U.S. legal system; health information laws and regulations; confidentiality, privacy and security concepts; release of information policies and procedures; and ethical issues in health information management. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the federal and state court systems and the legal process.
    2. Identify legal issues related to ownership, control and confidentiality of health information.
    3. Apply policies and procedures with regard to access, requests and disclosure of health information.
    4. Identify administrative, physical and technical safeguards that ensure health data and system security.
    5. Recognize core health information ethical problems including those related to privacy and confidentiality; compliance, fraud and abuse; Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems; and medical identity theft.
    Listed Topics
    1. Legislative and regulatory processes
    2. Health information/record laws and regulations (HIPAA, ARRA, etc.)
    3. Confidentiality and privacy policies, procedures and monitoring
    4. Data integrity and security processes and monitoring
    5. Release of information policies and procedures
    6. Ethical issues in health information management
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, internet sites, health records, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 207 - Clinical Quality Improvement, Regulatory Agencies & Specialty Facilities


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 100  

     
    Description
    This course presents a comprehensive study of the hospital-wide clinical quality improvement program, external regulatory agencies and health information requirements in the non-acute care setting. Topics include the organization and credentialing of the medical staff, as well as the clinical quality assessment, utilization management and risk management processes; accrediting, approving, licensing and certifying agencies that regulate health care; and non-acute care facilities, such as long-term care, ambulatory care and behavioral health care with their organizational characteristics, functions and health information requirements. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List the quality improvement tools and techniques used to monitor, report and improve patient care processes.
    2. Collect, organize and present data for the facility-wide quality management, utilization management, risk management and other patient care related studies.
    3. Analyze clinical data to identify trends that demonstrate quality, safety and effectiveness of healthcare.
    4. List mechanisms by which the medical staff reviews, evaluates and monitors medical staff functions and practices.
    5. Identify the current laws, accreditation, licensure and certification standards related to health information requirements.
    6. Apply policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with external regulations and standards.
    7. List the organizational characteristics, functions and health information requirements for non-acute care facilities.
    8. Differentiate the roles of various providers and disciplines throughout the continuum of healthcare.
    Listed Topics
    1. Quality improvement tools
    2. Medical staff credentialing
    3. Clinical quality assessment
    4. Utilization management
    5. Risk management
    6. Regulatory agencies in healthcare
    7. Non-acute care facilities in the healthcare community
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, software packages, health records, various internet sites, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 208 - Health Information Management


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor

     
    Description
    This course provides the health information technology student with management principles necessary for entry-level employment as a health information supervisor. In addition to general management topics such as communication and interpersonal skills; teams and committees; leadership concepts and techniques; and labor laws, much of the course is devoted to specific health information management topics. These include health information work flow and process monitors; plans and budgets and developing orientation, in-service and continuing education programs for healthcare employees. The student will also spend time sharing and evaluating specific management-related experiences learned during their professional practice at area healthcare facilities. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the function of common management tools.
    2. Identify the traits related to leadership effectiveness.
    3. Articulate the benefits of teamwork and committees and identify the steps in creating an effective team.
    4. Develop position descriptions, performance standards, staffing structures and work schedules for use as tools in human resource management.
    5. Prepare and conduct appropriate orientation, in-service and training programs for various healthcare employees.
    6. Explain the components of operational and capital budgets and describe the financial management functions of HIM professionals.
    Listed Topics
    1. Organizational tools such as policies, procedures, organization charts
    2. Leadership traits and functions
    3. Roles, function and benefits of teams and committees
    4. Communication and interpersonal skills
    5. Staffing, recruitment, orientation, training and retention
    6. Workflow and process monitors
    7. Organizational plans, budgets and resource allocation
    8. Human resource labor laws and regulations
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, software packages, internet sites, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MDR 210 - Ambulatory Care Clinical Coding & Reimbursement Systems


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MDR 102  

     
    Description
    This course includes a comprehensive study of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and Common Procedural Terminology (CPT) classification systems used in the ambulatory care setting. Payment and reimbursement methods such as the prospective payment system and managed care as well as billing and insurance procedures will be presented. The relationship between coding practice and corporate compliance will be emphasized. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply diagnoses and procedure codes using the ICD coding system and procedure codes using the CPT/Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) coding systems.
    2. Utilize current regulations and established guidelines in code assignments.
    3. Validate coding and sequencing accuracy using clinical information found in the health record.
    4. Determine accuracy of diagnostic and procedural groupings such as Ambulatory Payment Classifications.
    5. Resolve discrepancies between coded data and supporting documentation.
    6. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding.
    7. Determine accurate billing through coding, chargemaster, claims management and bill reconciliation processes.
    8. Apply policies and procedures to comply with the changing regulations among various payment systems for healthcare services.
    9. Perform data quality reviews to validate code assignment and coding compliance with reporting requirements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Ambulatory care clinical coding with the International Classification of Diseases
    2. Ambulatory care clinical coding with the Current Procedural Terminology
    3. Ambulatory payment classification assignment
    4. Healthcare reimbursement systems and methodologies
    5. Coding and corporate compliance
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, workbook, software packages, health records, current coding books, etc.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search



Microcomputer Electronics Technology

  
  • MIT 103 - Fundamentals of Microprocessors


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the assembly language used to control devices. Both machine language monitors and symbolic assemblers are presented. Laboratory work involves digital input and output, control of lights, relays, motors and analog to digital converters.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe logical and indexing operators.
    2. Analyze simple input and output (I/O) programs to control devices connected to microprocessors.
    3. Apply structured programming techniques to plan programs.
    4. Employ teamwork and leadership best practices in laboratory environments.
    5. Document programming projects.
    6. Develop programs using the two-pass assembly process.
    7. Design and test software and systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Operating systems and environments
    2. STAR environment
    3. Use of subroutines
    4. Math functions
    5. I/O techniques
    6. Two-pass assembler
    7. Logical operators
    8. Indexing operations
    9. Project development
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIT 104 - Introduction to Microcontrollers


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 103  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to embedded systems, their interfaces and how they apply to business practices. Students will troubleshoot for problems caused by microcontrollers and circuits in a hands-on lab environment. The course covers the architecture of the microcontroller, serial communications, simple process control and Input/Output (I/O) ports to a circuit. The I/O may include Analog-to-Digital (A/D) converters, sensors, Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and motors.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the architecture of microcontrollers.
    2. Explain how the microcontroller works.
    3. Troubleshoot problems in the microcontroller system and trace them to the source.
    4. Recognize how microcontrollers function.
    5. Utilize datasheets to search information.
    6. Identify digital and analog inputs and outputs.
    7. Develop digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuits between microcontrollers.
    8. Apply motor systems through microcontrollers.
    Listed Topics
    1. Motor control basics
    2. Assembly language programming
    3. Control flow-loop, jump, call instructions
    4. Programming in C
    5. Timer and timer-based scheduling
    6. Interrupt service routing
    7. I/O Port Programming-Serial Communication
    8. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI)
    9. Memory structure, bootup from Programmable Read-Only Memory (PROM)
    10. ADC, DAC sensor interfacing
    11. Step motor control
    12. DC motor control
    13. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/19/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIT 107 - Electronic Fabrication


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course prepares students to develop correct soldering practices, including placement, identification and solderability. The course will provide information on through-hole, as well as surface-mount soldering. Students will complete a through-hole project.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify all electronic components needed for projects.
    2. Use various electronic drafting techniques.
    3. Follow Inter-Process Communication (IPC) standards for soldering and inspection of soldering.
    4. Identify components and place them in a circuit using direction, simpleness of circuit and viewability.
    5. Improve basic soldering and desoldering skills.
    6. Build a through-hole project.
    7. Conduct surface-mount soldering.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to soldering
    2. Component reading
    3. Schematic symbols
    4. Safety
    5. Basic soldering skills
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIT 110 - Engineering Circuits 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 103   or Equivalent

     
    Description
    This course prepares students in electrical circuits analysis. Emphasis is on direct current systems. Topics include Kirchhoff’s laws, Thevinin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, network equations, induction, capacitance and resistor-capacitor (RC) transients.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply electronic workbench software to experiments in the laboratory to measure DC values and compare them with calculated values.
    2. Describe resistance and resistivity of materials used in electrical circuits.
    3. Solve multi-loop circuits by applying network theorems.
    4. Calculate the Thevinin’s voltage and resistance for the Thevinin equivalent circuit for any complex DC circuit and determine the maximum power delivered to a load.
    5. Examine the behavior of transient RC circuits for both transient and steady-state analysis.
    6. Utilize computer spreadsheets and obtain computer plots of functions.
    7. Assess back-up materials for subsequent electrical engineering courses employing DC circuit analysis in design.
    Listed Topics
    1. Units of measurement
    2. Current and voltage
    3. Resistance and conductance
    4. Ohm’s law, power and energy
    5. Series circuits
    6. Parallel and series-parallel circuits
    7. Methods of analysis
    8. Network theorems
    9. Capacitors
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIT 208 - Digital Electronics


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 103  

     
    Description
    This course will present the simple definition of truth tables for AND and OR logic types. The course proceeds through more complicated logic elements such as flip flops, adders, counters, random access and field programmable memories.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe basic operation logic gates and their applications.
    2. Employ logic probes and logic pulsers in troubleshooting.
    3. Operate multi-channel oscilloscopes to analyze timing in digital circuits.
    4. Recognize flip flops as frequency division and counting circuits.
    5. Analyze the operation of a frequency counter and a digital clock.
    6. Convert decimal numbers to binary, octal, hexadecimal and other bases by repeated methods of division.
    7. Design logic circuits as a security system for buildings or warehouses.
    8. Apply multisim software to obtain timing diagrams for digital circuits or measuring frequency and duty cycle of square waves.
    Listed Topics
    1. Logic types
    2. Gates
    3. Boolean algebra
    4. Combinational logic
    5. Multivibrators
    6. Flip flops
    7. Applications
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIT 210 - Electrical Engineering Circuits 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MIT 110  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of basic circuit analysis. Emphasis is on alternating current circuits. Topics include effective values, power factors, resistor capacitor (RC), resistor inductor circuits (RL), inductance and capacitance (RLC) circuit filters, multisource mesh and nodal analysis, transformer action, resonance andinductance. Computer analysis of circuit problems is covered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define time constant of an RC circuit, transient and steady-state analysis, complex impedance of RC, RL and RLC and of parallel and series-parallel circuits.
    2. Calculate total circuit impedance, total and branch currents in a series-parallel alternating current (AC) circuit and leading or lagging power factors.
    3. Apply software to measure total current and its phase angle to compare the measured values with calculated values.
    4. Solve multi-loop circuits by applying network theorems.
    5. Analyze complex AC circuits to determine the maximum power delivered to a load.
    6. Produce graphs by using computer spreadsheets.
    7. Assess measured and calculated values of series and parallel RLC AC circuits.
    8. Employ the oscilloscope instrument to measure phase angle for output voltage of a series RLC AC circuit.
    Listed Topics
    1. Inductors
    2. Sinusoidal alternating waveforms
    3. Complex numbers and forms
    4. Basic elements of phasors
    5. Series, parallel and series/parallel circuits
    6. Method of analysis
    7. Network theorems
    8. Resonance
    9. Decibel, filters and bode plots
    10. Magnetic circuits
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MIT 240 - Scientific & Industrial Instrumentation


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MIT 208   and PHY 113  

     
    Description
    This course presents techniques of measuring physical quantities through electronic transducers. Electronic circuits used to convert these signals to appropriate voltages are presented. Techniques for electronic signals to control physical systems through both analog and digital computers are also covered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain and troubleshoot basic process control loops, identifying dynamic variable, measurement process, controllers, final control elements and processes.
    2. Apply principles of physics and basic electronics to explain the representation of physical quantities of voltage.
    3. Select and apply correct thermal sensors for defined situations.
    4. Develop transfer function equations for signal input or output and draw electronic circuits.
    5. Select appropriate computer tools to calculate, graph and report process information.
    6. Analyze and use Analog to Digital (ADC) and Digital to Analog (DAC) circuits.
    7. Use thermal sensors such as thermocouples, thermistors, resistance/temperature detectors and mechanical systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Process control principles
    2. Analog signal conditioning
    3. Digital signal conditioning
    4. Thermal sensors
    5. Final control elements
    6. Controller principles
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/19/2011


    Course and Section Search



Multimedia Communications

  
  • MMC 111 - Digital Design for Multimedia


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on design practices and elements for different types of multimedia projects. Students practice with industry standard software to create assets for projects in areas of multimedia, including game design and web assets. Through project-based learning, students create projects that can be included in portfolios.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop graphics for multimedia projects.
    2. Create graphical assets for use in videos.
    3. Produce projects demonstrating a command of industry software.
    4. Construct images for 3D materials.
    5. Identify proper file measurements for production use in multimedia projects.
    Listed Topics
    1. Preparing images for web pages
    2. Preparing images for video
    3. Navigation and measurement systems
    4. Image tools
    5. Non-destructive editing
    6. Creating 3D materials
    7. Vector versus Bitmap graphics
    8. Designing for the web
    9. Designing for video games
    10. Proper resolutions, screen resolutions, line resolutions
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/14/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 112 - Audio and Video Production in Multimedia


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course allows students to create video and audio projects for portfolio presentation using industry software. Concepts practiced in this course also apply to areas of multimedia including video games and web development. Projects in this course prepare students for audio and video design and development, along with exploring special effects practices for design.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Make effective decisions related to digital audio and video information environments.
    2. Develop digital audio and video information collections.
    3. Organize digital audio and video information for presentation.
    4. Evaluate audio and video information and resources.
    5. Apply techniques for sharing and disseminating audio and visual elements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Exploring industry program workspaces
    2. Capturing and editing audio
    3. Multi-track files
    4. Working with scores
    5. Importing assets
    6. Capturing video
    7. Organizing a storyboard
    8. Working with timelines
    9. Video transitions
    10. Keyframes
    11. Exporting video
    12. Compression options for audio and video
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/14/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 150 - Interactive Front-End Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 125  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to interactive web development practices. Students will develop and design their own interactive web layouts utilizing current web development languages and practices. Through this, students will create their own interactive web media pieces that are responsive and multi-platform. 


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply interactive front-end languages to instigate user interactivity.
    2. Create scripts, dialog boxes, confirm boxes, prompt boxes, framesets and frames.
    3. Examine different types of variables, operators and data types.
    4. Apply logical and conditional operators, functions and objects.
    5. Demonstrate troubleshooting techniques.
    6. Examine the properties of document objects, form objects, string objects, date and math objects.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to correct data entry errors, detect browsers and platforms, and validate forms.
    Listed Topics
    1. Script structure and implementation
    2. Building blocks, data types, literals and variables
    3. Dialog boxes
    4. Operators
    5. Functions
    6. Objects
    7. Forms and input devices
    8. Working with images and links
    9. Handling events
    10. Data collection and display
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 160 - Game Design and Layout


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 100  

     
    Description
    This course introduces concepts and system of game design, including character, aesthetics, story, technology, structured conflict, resolution and outcome. Students examine the areas of the video game industry and prepare industry standard documentations for the phases of game development. Students also examine the different forms of how games are used in different industries and develop an understanding of current frameworks and practices in game design and development.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Illustrate the four elements of game design: mechanics, story, aesthetics and technology.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the video game industry.
    3. Develop a story line considering the different game genres.
    4. Utilize psychographics in the development of game narrative and scripts.
    5. Apply the concepts of flow and rules in game development.
    6. Create documentation and concepts sketches for video games.
    Listed Topics
    1. Video game industry history
    2. Game industry jobs and practices
    3. Game documentation design and development
    4. Genre and script designs
    5. Character types and development
    6. Theme, elements and interfaces
    7. Game platforms and requirements
    8. Game advertising and marketing
    9. Ethical and legal considerations of the game industry
    10. Portfolio development
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Culture Society and Citzenship
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 170 - Virtual Design and Simulated Realities


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MMC 160   or approval of the Department Head

     
    Description
    Students begin practicing with current virtual realities and elements to create interactive simulated environments using current game engine technologies. During this course, students will practice with hardware and software needed to implement immersive media experiences. Students will also create simulations for gaming, training and environmental experiences to examine the many uses of these emerging media forms.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Differentiate between various hardware platforms.
    2. Design different genres of immersive realities.
    3. Integrate simulation of experiences using current technologies.
    4. Apply interactive techniques to game technologies.
    5. Integrate multiple software packages for pipeline development.
    6. Create multi-industry based designs for portfolio demonstrations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
    2. Content pipelining
    3. Head mounted displays
    4. Mobile and console displays
    5. Actors and Artificial Intelligence (AI)
    6. Inverse kinematics
    7. Collision processing
    8. Utilization of toolkits and libraries
    9. Camera, light and audio implementation
    10. Psychology of gameplay
    11. User-Interface (UI) design and development
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 225 - Content Management Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to teach content management systems (CMS) for the publication of web content to web sites. Topics include individual user accounts, administration menus, RSS feeds, customizable layout, flexible account privileges, logging in, blogging systems, creating online forums and modules.  Students register and maintain individual user accounts and create content for a business website or an interactive community website.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Install and configure a content management system.
    2. Create pages and posts in a content management system.
    3. Find and use plugins.
    4. Identify widget installation process. 
    5. Assemble themes for use in content management systems.
    6. Utilize content management systems for creating interactive web content.
    Listed Topics
    1. Installing content management systems
    2. Getting around content management systems
    3. Configure your site
    4. HTML/CSS template
    5. Images and themes
    6. Plugins and widget
    7. Exporting content management systems to other platforms
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/14/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 228 - User Experience and Instructional Design


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    User Experience and Instructional Design (UX and ID) introduces students to industry practices and design processes for better understanding target audiences. Students explore the different models involved in the UX and ID process to prepare to create eLearning prototypes and modules. Additionally training with the analytics of better understanding user practices for development cycles and using industry software for creating eLearning content.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the differences between UX and UI design.
    2. Identify industry Instructional Design models.
    3. Prepare testable tasks for user testing studies.
    4. Synthesize data collected from telemetry and analytics of projects.
    5. Create user personas for project audiences.
    6. Develop user interaction of prototypes.
    7. Design and implement a usability test.
    8. Create eLearning modules.
    9. Apply gamification concepts to learning modules.
    Listed Topics
    1. Instruction Design models
    2. User Experience design
    3. Scripting and storyboarding
    4. Prototyping
    5. Target audience and personas
    6. Instructional Design software options
    7. Usability testing
    8. Module development
    9. Telemetry
    10. eLearning and gamification
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 230 - Self Promotion in a Virtual World


    Credits: 2
    2 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is designed to help students promote themselves in online communities, through social media, job postings and websites. Additionally, students prepare a portfolio for multimedia career opportunities. Students examine several approaches to presenting their work to potential employers. Students in the Multimedia program are encouraged to take this course in their last semester.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Organize previous web pieces into a portfolio format.
    2. Develop a resume according to suggested guidelines.
    3. Define the importance and effectiveness of a cover letter.
    4. Develop an online platform for the display of an individualized portfolio.
    5. Utilize social media in self-promotion.
    Listed Topics
    1. Purpose of a portfolio
    2. Audience
    3. Delivery and format
    4. Optimizing
    5. Creating written content
    6. Techniques for collecting and preparing the portfolio
    7. Specialized portfolio design sites
    8. Job postings
    9. Social media
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/14/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 231 - Web Commerce


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 125  

     
    Description
    This course is designed to teach programming skills to create and maintain e-commerce websites utilizing content management systems (CMS), planning site layout and navigation, organizing content, creating sites and linking to databases. Additionally, students will test interactivity and usability, market content and utilize search engine optimization (SEO) for speed and accessibility. Topics include dynamic web pages, server-side development with software such as Hypertext Preprocesser (PHP), Structured Query Language (MySQL) and relevant e-commerce development issues.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define e-commerce.
    2. Implement a web marketing plan.
    3. Explain the steps required to set up e-commerce websites.
    4. Apply principles of effective web design and ongoing site maintenance.
    5. Describe e-commerce marketing goals.
    6. Create a fully functional website, including an e-commerce site with a product catalog using software applications.
    7. Use MySQL and PHP to deliver dynamic web content.
    8. Apply SEO techniques to rank high in organic web search results.
    9. Recognize search engine marketing (SEM) for paid search efforts.
    10. Evaluate a shopping cart provider and set up online payment options.
    11. Recognize the legal, ethical and tax issues of payments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Electronic commerce and technology infrastructure
    2. Selling and marketing on the web
    3. eCommerce Environment: Legal, ethical and tax issues
    4. Web marketing goals
    5. Online product promotion
    6. Site usability
    7. SEO
    8. Customer relationship management
    9. Online catalogs
    10. Payment gateways
    11. Transaction and web site security
    12. Legal and ethical ramifications
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 11/15/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 250 - Game Environments and Interactivity


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    In this course, students practice with industry software to create interactive games in two-dimensional and three-dimensional environments. Students utilize characters and models to generate robust interactive spaces that can be used for learning and entertainment. Students create projects that can be used in portfolios and apply the game design production process.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop robust game environments.
    2. Select appropriate assets for specific game genres.
    3. Assemble interactive game elements to engage users.
    4. Execute proper publishing practices for video game platforms.
    5. Combine multimedia elements in a game environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. 3D Assets
    2. Animation
    3. Lighting for 3D
    4. Keyframe animation
    5. Working with lights
    6. Developing interactive elements
    7. Interface and tools
    8. Working with camera angles in 3D
    9. Portfolio development
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 2/14/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 260 - 3D Modeling Design and Layout


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on introducing students to the practices of creating 3D model designs for multiple platforms. Students are familiarized with 3D terminology and practices for multiple platforms. Content created in the course is project-based and will be prepared for portfolio presentations. This course prepares students to apply proper modeling practices and techniques that are utilized in numerous industries.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define 3D terminology used with 3D modelling.
    2. Identify anatomy of different 3D elements used in modelling.
    3. Construct 3D models for different genres of 3D design.
    4. Apply textures and materials to self-created models.
    5. Build 3D models for different platforms.
    6. Prepare UV maps for use on developed 3D models.
    7. Produce usable models for everyday needs.
    8. Develop 3D renders for portfolio use.
    Listed Topics
    1. 3D elements and terminology
    2. 3D workflow
    3. Creating and editing polygons
    4. Polygon control and subdivision
    5. Non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBs) and curves
    6. 3D sculpting practices
    7. Texture measurements
    8. Materials
    9. UV mapping
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MMC 270 - 3D Animation and Design


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MMC 260  

     
    Description
    Students continue to build upon the skills developed working with 3D models, materials and renderings to create animated layouts that are used for training, simulation and gaming. This course integrates lighting practices for scene and animation along with animation terminology. Students are also introduced to plugins and preset practices often utilized by 3D programs.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define animation terminology used for 3D animation.
    2. Create 3D animated projects using self-created models.
    3. Integrate 3D animations into other industry programs.
    4. Demonstrate lighting techniques for 3D design.
    5. Develop storyboards for camera work in 3D environments.
    6. Explain the importance of presets and scripts when working with 3D.
    7. Implement rigging practices into 3D animation.
    8. Integrate particle and render effects into 3D animation.
    9. Create 3D scenes demonstrating lighting techniques and effects.
    Listed Topics
    1. 3D animation terminology
    2. Animation practices
    3. Rigging
    4. Particles and effects
    5. Lighting methods
    6. Depth maps
    7. Camera controls
    8. Exporting elements
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search



Music Theory & Practice

  
  • MUS 101 - Introduction to Music


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course surveys the form, style and basic structure of art, world and popular music. It is designed to enhance students’ appreciation and understanding of music by focusing on influential composers and their compositions. Lectures highlight the characteristics, history and performance practice of many genres of music.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the essential attributes of various genres of music.
    2. Identify important composers and compositions by name through listening.
    3. Summarize important developments in music history.
    4. Compare Western art music, world music and popular music.
    5. Distinguish the instrumental timbres of common ensembles
    Listed Topics
    1. Instrumental timbres
    2. Improvisation
    3. Western art music
    4. World and popular music
    Reference Materials
    Department selected text and music recordings.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • MUS 105 - Applied Music 1


    Credits: 1
    1 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course combines private music instruction with rehearsal and performance. The instruction consists of 15 30-minute private music lessons in voice or an instrument of the student’s choosing. An additional eight hours are devoted to rehearsing and performing in a recital. Lessons focus on music reading, repertoire development and vocal or instrumental technique. Students are responsible for private lesson fees, which are not included in tuition. Students may be required to travel off campus for private lessons. Choice of vocal/instrumental study may be limited based on private instructor availability.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform selected pieces or compose and notate original music.
    2. Demonstrate vocal or instrumental techniques appropriate to the applicable musical style.
    3. Interpret standard music notation.
    4. Develop a repertoire for performance.
    5. Generate a practice journal.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocal or instrumental methods
    2. Music reading
    3. Repertoire development
    4. Performance practice
    Reference Materials
    Sheet music, music recordings, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • MUS 106 - Applied Music 2


    Credits: 1
    1 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 105  

     
    Description
    This course combines private music instruction with rehearsal and performance. The instruction consists of 15 30-minute private music lessons in voice or an instrument of the student’s choosing. An additional eight hours are devoted to rehearsing and performing in a recital. Lessons focus on music reading, repertoire development and vocal or instrumental technique. Students are responsible for private lesson fees, which are not included in tuition. Students may be required to travel off campus for private lessons. Choice of vocal/instrumental study may be limited based on private instructor availability. Applied Music 2 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Applied Music 1.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform selected pieces or compose and notate original music.
    2. Demonstrate vocal or instrumental techniques appropriate to the applicable musical style.
    3. Interpret standard music notation.
    4. Develop a repertoire for performance.
    5. Generate a practice journal.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocal or instrumental methods
    2. Music reading
    3. Repertoire development
    4. Performance practice
    Reference Materials
    Sheet music, music recordings, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • MUS 109 - College Choir 1


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course involves the development of choral repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles from traditional and contemporary choral literature. Classroom activities focus on music reading, vocal production and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform choral music in concert.
    2. Demonstrate vocal techniques appropriate to various musical styles.
    3. Develop sight-singing and memorization techniques.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Phonation
    2. Articulation
    3. Sight singing
    4. Performance etiquette
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 110 - College Choir 2


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 109  

     
    Description
    This course involves the development of choral repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles from traditional and contemporary choral literature. Classroom activities focus on music reading, vocal production and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills. College Choir 2 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in College Choir 1.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform choral music in concert.
    2. Demonstrate vocal techniques appropriate to various musical styles.
    3. Develop sight-singing and memorization techniques.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Phonation
    2. Articulation
    3. Sight singing
    4. Performance etiquette
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 113 - Show Choir 1


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a musical theatre ensemble.  It addresses vocal and dance techniques common in musical theatre repertoire.  Classroom activities include exercises designed to develop students’ vocal and dance skills; song interpretation; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and staged performances.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the essential attributes of various musical theatre styles.
    2. Demonstrate, in performances, vocal and dance techniques appropriate to various musical theatre styles.
    3. Analyze specific vocal and physical challenges in various musical theatre songs and dances.
    4. Analyze the similarities and differences between solo and ensemble performance (both singing and dancing).
    5. Interpret the text and musical setting of various musical theatre songs.
    6. Evaluate performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Musical theatre repertoire
    2. Vocal techniques
    3. Dance techniques
    4. Solo and ensemble techniques
    5. Song interpretation
    6. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 114 - Show Choir 2


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 113  

     
    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a musical theatre ensemble.  It addresses vocal and dance techniques common in musical theatre repertoire.  Classroom activities include exercises designed to develop students’ vocal and dance skills; song interpretation; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and staged performances.  Show Choir 2 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Show Choir 1.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the essential attributes of various musical theatre styles.
    2. Demonstrate, in performances, vocal and dance techniques appropriate to various musical theatre styles.
    3. Analyze specific vocal and physical challenges in various musical theatre songs and dances.
    4. Analyze the similarities and differences between solo and ensemble performance (both singing and dancing).
    5. Interpret the text and musical setting of various musical theatre songs.
    6. Evaluate performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Musical theatre repertoire
    2. Vocal techniques
    3. Dance techniques
    4. Solo and ensemble techniques
    5. Song interpretation
    6. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 115 - Jazz Ensemble 1


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a jazz band. It covers a diversity of jazz styles including Latin, blues and swing. Coursework emphasizes music, reading, improvisation, performance practice and ensemble technique. Jazz Ensemble 2, 3 and 4 build upon the skills and techniques developed in the previous Jazz Ensemble course.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform jazz arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Develop jazz performance techniques.
    4. Perform solo improvisations.
    5. Compare various jazz styles.
    6. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance practice
    4. Jazz styles
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 116 - Jazz Ensemble 2


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 115  

     
    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a jazz band. It covers a diversity of jazz styles including Latin, blues and swing.  Coursework emphasizes music reading, improvisation, performance practice and ensemble technique. Jazz Ensemble 2 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Jazz Ensemble 1.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform jazz arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Develop jazz performance techniques.
    4. Perform solo improvisations.
    5. Compare various jazz styles.
    6. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance practice
    4. Jazz styles
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 119 - Introduction to Music Technology


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the technologies used in music production. It covers Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) principles and techniques, as well as the computer applications and outboard equipment used by professional audio engineers. The software used in this class includes programs for audio editing, sequencing and score writing. Instruction is combined with practical application on a digital audio workstation.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the development of MIDI and its impact on the music industry. 
    2. Identify the utility of specific audio engineering equipment.
    3. Operate the hardware and software components of a digital audio workstation.
    4. Create musical scores using music notation software.
    5. Summarize the theoretical scope and practical application of music technology.
    Listed Topics
    1. MIDI
    2. Digital audio workstation
    3. Audio editing
    4. Sequencing
    5. Sound and hearing
    6. Score writing
    Reference Materials
    textbook, internet, digital audio workstation, music sequencing and editing software, music notation software.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • MUS 121 - History of Music 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an in-depth study of Western art music from antiquity until 1750. It traces the development of music’s aural traditions and notational systems by exploring composers and their compositions. Lectures cover musical form, practice and style through analytical listening and source study. Contemporaneous happenings in world history are examined for context and scope.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recite the story of Western music’s origin and development.
    2. Demonstrate a learned understanding of a specific facet of Musicology.
    3. Synthesize world history with music history.
    4. Identify important composers by name through listening.
    5. Summarize the important developments in the evolution of musical notation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Music of antiquity
    2. The development of notation
    3. Medieval music
    4. Renaissance music
    5. Baroque music
    Reference Materials
    Textbook: A History of Western Music by J. Peter Burkholder, Donald Jay Grout and Claude V. Palisca
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


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  • MUS 122 - History of Music 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course in an in-depth study of Western art music from 1750 until present day. The materials covered by this class are examined through source study, analytical listening and research. Lectures cover musical form, practice and style, as well as world history.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recite the story of Western music’s continued development.
    2. Present a specific facet of musicology.
    3. Synthesize world history with music history.
    4. Identify important composers by name through listening.
    5. Summarize the important developments in the evolution of musical composition.
    Listed Topics
    1. Classical music
    2. Composition and form
    3. Romantic music
    4. Twentieth century music
    5. Jazz
    Reference Materials
    Department-selected text
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


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  • MUS 126 - Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 1


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Description
    This course entails the development of ensemble repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles and instrumental configurations. Classroom activities focus on music reading, improvisation and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Demonstrate improvisational technique.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance etiquette
    4. Ensemble technique

    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/15/2014


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  • MUS 127 - Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 2


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 126  

     
    Description
    This course entails the development of ensemble repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles and instrumental configurations. Classroom activites focus on music reading, improvisation and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills. Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 2 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 1.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Demonstrate improvisational technique.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance etiquette
    4. Ensemble technique

    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/15/2014


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  • MUS 128 - Music Theory and Analysis 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: MUS 137  recommended

    Description
    This is an introductory course designed to develop students’ written music theory skills. It covers music notation, scales, keys, intervals, triads, rhythm and meter. Coursework includes application of these concepts through analysis of music repertoire.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the musical symbols used to indicate pitch in the treble and bass clefs.
    2. Identify the musical symbols used to indicate rhythmic patterns in simple meters.
    3. Write scales, key signatures, intervals and triads in treble and bass clefs.
    4. Compose rhythms in simple meters.
    5. Analyze the melodic structure of musical phrases.
    Listed Topics
    1. Treble and bass clefs
    2. Scales, keys and intervals
    3. Triads
    4. Rhythm
    5. Simple meters
    6. Melodic analysis
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 129 - Music Theory and Analysis 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 128  
    Co-requisites: MUS 138  recommended

    Description
    This course builds upon the written music theory skills developed in Music Theory and Analysis 1. It covers the fundamentals of diatonic harmony through part writing and analysis of music from the Baroque, Classical and Romantics eras. The relationship between harmonic and melodic content is emphasized.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss musical concepts using the standard terminology of the Western art music tradition.
    2. Demonstrate complete facility in the major and minor system of keys used in the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods of Western art music.
    3. Identify the musical symbols used to indicate pitch in the treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs.
    4. Identify the musical symbols used to indicate rhythmic patterns in simple and compound meters.
    5. Write intervals, triads and seventh chords.
    6. Compose four-part textures that are consistent with the conventions of four-part chorale-style writing.
    7. Employ Roman numeral analysis techniques to analyze music from the Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras.
    8. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of jazz/pop harmonic notation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs
    2. Intervals, triads and seventh chords
    3. Roman numeral analysis
    4. Lead sheet notation
    5. Part writing
    6. Simple and compound meters
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 130 - Class Voice 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This is an introductory course designed to develop students’ singing skills. It addresses basic techniques of vocal production with a focus on the Bel Canto technique of singing. Lectures and activities include exercises designed to develop students’ vocal skills; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and vocal performances.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the various aspects of vocal production.
    2. Demonstrate, in vocal performances, a use of posture, breath control, vocal placement and articulation consistent with the Bel Canto technique.
    3. Analyze specific vocal challenges in various songs.
    4. Analyze the relationship between text and music in various songs.
    5. Evaluate vocal performances
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocal anatomy
    2. Bel Canto technique
    3. Phonation
    4. Articulation
    5. Song interpretation
    6. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/07/2015


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  • MUS 131 - Class Voice 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 130  

     
    Description
    This course builds on the singing skills developed in Class Voice 1. Students rehearse and perform more advanced vocal repertoire from the Western art tradition as they refine their application of the Bel Canto technique of singing. In addition, this course addresses vocal techniques common in musical theatre. Lectures and activities include more advanced exercises designed to develop students’ vocal skills; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and vocal performances representing both classical and musical theatre styles.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the essential attributes of the Bel Canto technique.
    2. Demonstrate the Bel Canto technique while performing songs at the intermediate level of difficulty.
    3. Analyze the similarities and differences between classical and musical theatre vocal styles.
    4. Analyze the relationship between text and music in various songs from classical and musical theatre repertoire.
    5. Evaluate performances of songs from classical and musical theatre repertoire.
    Listed Topics
    1. Bel Canto technique
    2. Musical theatre vocal styles
    3. Phonation
    4. Articulation
    5. Song interpretation
    6. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 137 - Musicianship Skills 1


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: MUS 128  recommended

    Description
    This is an introductory course designed to develop students’ aural music theory skills. It includes identification of scales, intervals, triads and rhythmic patterns; sight singing in treble and bass clefs; and melodic and rhythmic dictation. The course material covers major and minor modes, as well as rhythm patterns in simple meters.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify scales, intervals, triads and rhythm patterns presented aurally.
    2. Sing major and minor scales.
    3. Sing melodic intervals.
    4. Interpret music in the treble and bass clefs while sight singing melodies.
    5. Interpret sound patterns presented aurally while taking melodic and rhythmic dictation in simple meters.
    Listed Topics
    1. Treble and bass clefs
    2. Scales, keys and intervals
    3. Major and minor modes
    4. Triads
    5. Rhythm
    6. Simple meters
    7. Melodic and rhythmic dictation
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 138 - Musicianship Skills 2


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 137  
    Co-requisites: MUS 129  recommended

    Description
    This course builds upon the aural music theory skills developed in Musicianship Skills 1. It includes identification of intervals, triads and seventh chords; sight singing in treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs; and melodic and rhythmic dictation in simple and compound meters. The course material covers major and minor modes, as well as simple and compound meters.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the quality of triads and seventh chords presented aurally.
    2. Sing triads and seventh chords.
    3. Improvise rhythm patterns in simple and compound meters.
    4. Interpret music in the treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs while sight singing melodies.
    5. Interpret sound patterns presented aurally while taking melodic and rhythmic dictation in simple and compound meters.
    Listed Topics
    1. Treble, bass, alto and tenor clefs
    2. Intervals, triads and seventh chords
    3. Rhythmic improvisation
    4. Simple and compound meters
    5. Melodic and rhythmic dictation
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 140 - Class Guitar 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the guitar for beginners. It covers fundamental guitar skills such as music reading, accompaniment and repertoire development. Coursework integrates general music theory with basic fretboard technique.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply tuning methods for proper adjustment of the six strings.
    2. Compare playing positions of sitting and standing.
    3. Design a practice schedule suited for individual progress.
    4. Integrate plectrum and fingerstyle technique.
    5. Perform from notation and from memory.
    6. Demonstrate accompaniment and solo guitar approaches.
    Listed Topics
    1. Holding the guitar
    2. Setup and maintenance
    3. Plectrum and fingerstyle
    4. The treble clef
    5. Rhythm
    6. First position
    7. Scales
    8. Accompaniment patterns
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, internet, guitar
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 141 - Class Guitar 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 140  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the skills covered in Class Guitar 1. Students explore various methods for lead and rhythm guitar. Coursework integrates general music theory with basic fretboard technique.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Integrate guitar playing with ensemble technique.
    2. Develop a set list designed for professional performance.
    3. Improvise melodies to chord progressions.
    4. Synthesize guitar skills with performance practice.
    5. Create accompaniment patterns from lead sheet notation.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scale systems
    2. Hybrid picking
    3. Lead sheet improvisation
    4. Ensemble technique
    5. Lead and rhythm guitar
    6. Chord melody
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, internet, guitar
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 160 - American Popular Music


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course surveys American popular music from 19th-century folk songs to the present day. It addresses the forms, styles, performance practices and socio-cultural aspects of various genres of American popular music. Lectures are designed to synthesize popular music with American culture through analytical listening and source study.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the essential attributes of various American popular music styles.
    2. Identify important composers, performers and compositions by name through listening.
    3. Summarize important developments in American popular music history.
    4. Compare and contrast various genres of American popular music.
    5. Synthesize American popular music styles with their socio-cultural context.
    Listed Topics
    1. Folk music
    2. Minstrelsy
    3. Blues
    4. Ragtime
    5. Jazz
    6. Rock music
    7. Country music
    8. Musical Theatre
    9. Rap/Hip-Hop
    Reference Materials
    textbook, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 170 - Audio Recording 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to audio recording principles and techniques. It covers the physics of sound, analog/digital recording principles and the basic operation of recording studio equipment. Coursework includes the study of microphone selection and placement, recording consoles, signal processing and mixing. Instruction is combined with practical application in a recording studio.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain how the physics of sound relates to audio recording techniques.
    2. Demonstrate proper microphone selection and placement for a variety of studio recording scenarios.
    3. Experiment with signal processing and mixing techniques.
    4. Create audio recordings in a studio environment.
    5. Evaluate studio recordings.
    Listed Topics
    1. The physics of sound
    2. Analog and digital recording
    3. Microphone techniques
    4. Signal processing
    5. Mixing
    Reference Materials
    textbook, digital audio workstation, music sequencing and editing software.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • MUS 171 - Audio Recording 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 170  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the recording principles and techniques developed in MUS 170 , Audio Recording 1. It covers advanced signal processing, mixing and mastering techniques. Instruction is combined with practical application in both live and studio recording environments.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the relationship between mixing and mastering.
    2. Demonstrate proper microphone selection and placement for a variety of live and studio recording scenarios.
    3. Experiment with advanced signal processing, mixing and mastering techniques.
    4. Create audio recordings in both live and studio environments.
    5. Evaluate live and studio recordings.
    Listed Topics
    1. Live and studio recording
    2. Microphone techniques
    3. Advanced signal processing techniques
    4. Advanced mixing techniques
    5. Mastering
    Reference Materials
    textbook, digital audio workstation, music sequencing and editing software.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • MUS 172 - The Business of Music


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview of the business issues encountered in the music industry. It covers music publishing, marketing and distribution; royalties, copyrights and licensing; recording contracts and artist representation; and entrepreneurship. Coursework includes discussion of the various career opportunities within the music industry.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Summarize the significant changes in the history of the recording industry.
    2. Explain the concept of intellectual property as it relates to royalties, copyrights and licensing within the music industry.
    3. Examine the relationship between record companies and the artists they represent.
    4. Evaluate various business strategies for publishing, marketing and distributing music.
    5. Compare various career opportunities within the music industry.
    Listed Topics
    1. Music publishing
    2. Intellectual property
    3. Artist representation
    4. Music marketing
    5. Music careers
    Reference Materials
    textbook, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/19/2016


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  • MUS 205 - Applied Music 3


    Credits: 1
    1 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites:   MUS 106  

     
    Description
    This course combines private music instruction with rehearsal and performance. The instruction consists of 15 30-minute private music lessons in voice or an instrument of the student’s choosing. An additional eight hours are devoted to rehearsing and performing in a recital. Lessons focus on music reading, repertoire development and vocal or instrumental technique. Students are responsible for private lesson fees, which are not included in tuition. Students may be required to travel off campus for private lessons. Choice of vocal/instrumental study may be limited based on private instructor availability. Applied Music 3 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Applied Music 2.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform selected pieces or compose and notate original music.
    2. Demonstrate vocal or instrumental techniques appropriate to the applicable musical style.
    3. Interpret standard music notation.
    4. Develop a repertoire for performance.
    5. Generate a practice journal.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocal or instrumental methods
    2. Music reading
    3. Repertoire development
    4. Performance practice
    Reference Materials
    Sheet music, music recordings, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • MUS 206 - Applied Music 4


    Credits: 1
    1 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 205  

     
    Description
    This course combines private music instruction with rehearsal and performance. The instruction consists of 15 30-minute private music lessons in voice or an instrument of the student’s choosing. An additional eight hours are devoted to rehearsing and performing in a recital. Lessons focus on music reading, repertoire development and vocal or instrumental technique. Students are responsible for private lesson fees, which are not included in tuition. Students may be required to travel off campus for private lessons. Choice of vocal/instrumental study may be limited based on private instructor availability. Applied Music 4 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Applied Music 3.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform selected pieces or compose and notate original music.
    2. Demonstrate vocal or instrumental techniques appropriate to the applicable musical style.
    3. Interpret standard music notation.
    4. Develop a repertoire for performance.
    5. Generate a practice journal.
    Listed Topics
    1. Vocal or instrumental methods
    2. Music reading
    3. Repertoire development
    4. Performance practice
    Reference Materials
    Sheet music, music recordings, internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • MUS 209 - College Choir 3


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 110  

     
    Description
    This course involves the development of choral repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles from traditional and contemporary choral literature. Classroom activities focus on music reading, vocal production and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills. College Choir 3 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in College Choir 2.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform choral music in concert.
    2. Demonstrate vocal techniques appropriate to various musical styles.
    3. Develop sight-singing and memorization techniques.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Phonation
    2. Articulation
    3. Sight singing
    4. Performance etiquette
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 210 - College Choir 4


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 209  

     
    Description
    This course involves the development of choral repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles from traditional and contemporary choral literature. Classroom activities focus on music reading, vocal production and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills. College Choir 4 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in College Choir 3.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform choral music in concert.
    2. Demonstrate vocal techniques appropriate to various musical styles.
    3. Develop sight-singing and memorization techniques.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Phonation
    2. Articulation
    3. Sight singing
    4. Performance etiquette
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 213 - Show Choir 3


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 114  

     
    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a musical theatre ensemble.  It addresses vocal and dance techniques common in musical theatre repertoire.  Classroom activities include exercises designed to develop students’ vocal and dance skills; song interpretation; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and staged performances.  Show Choir 3 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Show Choir 2.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the essential attributes of various musical theatre styles.
    2. Demonstrate, in performances, vocal and dance techniques appropriate to various musical theatre styles.
    3. Analyze specific vocal and physical challenges in various musical theatre songs and dances.
    4. Analyze the similarities and differences between solo and ensemble performance (both singing and dancing).
    5. Interpret the text and musical setting of various musical theatre songs.
    6. Evaluate performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Musical theatre repertoire
    2. Vocal techniques
    3. Dance techniques
    4. Solo and ensemble techniques
    5. Song interpretation
    6. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 214 - Show Choir 4


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 213  

     
    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a musical theatre ensemble.  It addresses vocal and dance techniques common in musical theatre repertoire.  Classroom activities include exercises designed to develop students’ vocal and dance skills; song interpretation; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and staged performances.  Show Choir 4 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Show Choir 3.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the essential attributes of various musical theatre styles.
    2. Demonstrate, in performances, vocal and dance techniques appropriate to various musical theatre styles.
    3. Analyze specific vocal and physical challenges in various musical theatre songs and dances.
    4. Analyze the similarities and differences between solo and ensemble performance (both singing and dancing).
    5. Interpret the text and musical setting of various musical theatre songs.
    6. Evaluate performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Musical theatre repertoire
    2. Vocal techniques
    3. Dance techniques
    4. Solo and ensemble techniques
    5. Song interpretation
    6. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 215 - Jazz Ensemble 3


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 116  

     
    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a jazz band. It covers a diversity of jazz styles including Latin, blues and swing.  Coursework emphasizes music reading, improvisation, performance practice and ensemble technique. Jazz Ensemble 3 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Jazz Ensemble 2.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform jazz arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Develop jazz performance techniques.
    4. Perform solo improvisations.
    5. Compare various jazz styles.
    6. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance practice
    4. Jazz styles
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 216 - Jazz Ensemble 4


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 215  

     
    Description
    This course comprises the formation of a jazz band. It covers a diversity of jazz styles including Latin, blues and swing.  Coursework emphasizes music reading, improvisation, performance practice and ensemble technique. Jazz Ensemble 4 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Jazz Ensemble 3.  


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform jazz arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Develop jazz performance techniques.
    4. Perform solo improvisations.
    5. Compare various jazz styles.
    6. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance practice
    4. Jazz styles
    5. Ensemble technique
    Reference Materials
    sheet music, CDs
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 221 - Class Piano 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the piano for beginners. It covers fundamental concepts and skills of piano playing including playing technique, music reading, scales, chords and repertoire development. Coursework integrates general music theory with basic piano keyboard technique.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper piano playing technique.
    2. Perform selected major scales.
    3. Perform major and minor triads.
    4. Interpret music notation in the grand staff.
    5. Create harmonic accompaniments using lead sheet notation.
    6. Develop sight-reading and memorization techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Grand staff
    2. Rhythm
    3. Major scales
    4. Triads
    5. Lead sheet notation
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, internet, piano
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/08/2015


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  • MUS 222 - Class Piano 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 221  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the piano skills and concepts covered in Class Piano 1. It covers major and minor scales, chord inversions, dominant seventh chords and cadences. Coursework integrates these music theory concepts with piano keyboard technique.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper piano playing technique.
    2. Perform major scales and harmonic minor scales.
    3. Perform chord inversions of major and minor triads.
    4. Perform dominant seventh chords.
    5. Perform cadences in major and minor keys.
    6. Interpret music notation in the grand staff.
    7. Create multiple accompaniment patterns using lead sheet notation.
    8. Develop sight-reading and memorization techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Grand staff
    2. Major and minor scales
    3. Inversions
    4. Dominant seventh chords
    5. Cadences
    6. Lead sheet notation
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, internet, piano
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 223 - Class Piano 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 222  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the piano skills and concepts covered in Class Piano 2. It covers additional types of minor scales, seventh chords and transposition. Coursework integrates these music theory concepts with piano keyboard technique.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper piano playing technique.
    2. Perform major scales and all three types of minor scales.
    3. Distinguish between different types of seventh chords.
    4. Interpret music notation in the grand staff.
    5. Create multiple accompaniment patterns using lead sheet notation containing seventh chords.
    6. Perform and transpose piano works.
    Listed Topics
    1. Grand staff
    2. Major and minor scales
    3. Seventh chords
    4. Lead sheet notation
    5. Transposition
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, internet, piano
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 224 - Class Piano 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 223  

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the piano skills and concepts covered in Class Piano 3. It covers diatonic modes, extended chords, melody harmonization and improvisation. Coursework integrates these music theory concepts with piano keyboard technique.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper piano playing technique.
    2. Perform major scales, minor scales and diatonic modes.
    3. Distinguish between different types of ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords.
    4. Create multiple accompaniment patterns using lead sheet notation containing extended chords.
    5. Improvise melodies from given chord progressions.
    6. Create harmonic accompaniment from given melodies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Diatonic modes
    2. Extended chords
    3. Lead sheet notation
    4. Improvisation
    5. Harmonization
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, internet, piano
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 226 - Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 3


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 127  

     
    Description
    This course entails the development of ensemble repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles and instrumental configurations. Classroom activities focus on music reading, improvisation and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills. Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 3 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 2.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Demonstrate improvisational technique.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance etiquette
    4. Ensemble technique

    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/25/2014


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  • MUS 227 - Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 4


    Credits: 2
    3 Studio Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 226  

     
    Description
    This course entails the development of ensemble repertoire and performance technique. It covers a diversity of styles and instrumental configurations. Classroom activities focus on music reading, improvisation and ensemble technique as well as the application of self-evaluation and critical listening skills. Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 4 builds upon the skills and techniques developed in Instrumental/Vocal Ensemble 3.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform arrangements in concert.
    2. Arrange instrumental and vocal parts from chord charts.
    3. Demonstrate improvisational technique.
    4. Develop ensemble performance skills.
    5. Evaluate musical performances.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scoring and arranging
    2. Improvisation
    3. Performance etiquette
    4. Ensemble technique

    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/16/2014


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  • MUS 228 - Music Theory and Analysis 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 129  
    Co-requisites: MUS 237  recommended

    Description
    This course builds upon the written music theory skills developed in Music Theory and Analysis 2. It covers chromatic elements found in music from the common practice period of Western music history. Coursework includes the study of tonicizations, modulations, sequences, modal mixture and other chromatic chords.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss musical concepts using the standard terminology of the Western art music tradition.
    2. Distinguish between various types of musical sequences.
    3. Summarize the predominant techniques of modulation in Western art music.
    4. Analyze musical excerpts from the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods that contain chromatic elements.
    5. Compose four-part chorales that contain chromatic elements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sequences
    2. Modulation
    3. Tonicization
    4. Modal mixture
    5. Chromaticism
    6. Chromatic mediants
    7. Neapolitan sixth chords
    8. Augmented sixth chords
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 229 - Music Theory and Analysis 4


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 228  
    Co-requisites: MUS 238  recommended

    Description
    This course builds upon the written music theory skills developed in Music Theory and Analysis 3. It covers a variety of techniques for analyzing music from the Baroque era to the present. The motives, phrases, themes and large-scale structures of compositions are analyzed with a focus on how all of these elements relate to each other and to the composition as a whole.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate competency in musical analysis at multiple levels (i.e., motivic, phrase level and thematic).
    2. Employ multiple techniques for music analysis.
    3. Evaluate the appropriateness of various analytical techniques for specific musical tasks.
    4. Summarize the predominant musical forms of 18th and 19th-century art music.
    5. Describe 20th and 21st-century compositional techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. 18th and 19th-century musical forms
    2. 20th and 21st-century techniques
    3. Motivic manipulation
    4. Phrase rhythm
    5. Diatonic modes
    6. Non-diatonic scales
    7. Syncopation
    8. Mixed meters
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, CDs, sheet music, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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  • MUS 230 - Class Voice 3


    Credits: 3
    3 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MUS 131  

     
    Description
    This course builds on the singing skills developed in Class Voice 2. Students further refine their vocal techniques through rehearsal and performance of classical and musical theatre songs. In addition, this course addresses vocal techniques from various other styles, including jazz, pop, folk, and country. Lectures and activities include exercises designed to address vocal techniques specific to particular musical styles; solo and ensemble rehearsals; and vocal performances representing various musical genres.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize the essential attributes of various vocal styles and techniques.
    2. Demonstrate, in performance, vocal techniques appropriate to various musical styles.
    3. Synthesize vocal styles with their socio-cultural context.
    4. Analyze the relationship between text and music in songs from various musical styles.
    5. Evaluate performances of songs from various musical styles.
    Listed Topics
    1. Bel Canto technique
    2. Musical theatre vocal styles
    3. Jazz vocal styles
    4. Pop vocal styles
    5. Folk vocal styles
    6. Country vocal styles
    7. Song interpretation
    8. Performance etiquette
    Reference Materials
    textbook, sheet music, CDs, internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 12/15/2014


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