Apr 14, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Diagnostic Medical Sonography

  
  • DMS 237C - Ultrasound Clinical 4/Vascular


    Credits: 6
    360 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 235C , DMS 207 , DMS 210  
    Co-requisites: DMS 239  

    Description
    The student will have the opportunity to refine skills in scanning. Interpretation of the presenting clinical signs and symptoms will be one of the objectives for this clinical course. Accuracy in recognizing anatomical variations and pathology, completing the examination in a timely manner and presenting the findings to the interpreting physician will be the main objective for this clinical rotation. The student will continue to perform portable examinations and assist the physician and clinical instructor in any special procedures. (Three full-time days per week). This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply proper scanning techniques to visualize normal and abnormal anatomy of the extremity veins.
    2. Apply proper scanning techniques to visualize normal and abnormal anatomy of the carotid arteries.
    3. Apply proper scanning techniques to visualize normal and abnormal anatomy of the extremity arteries.
    4. Analyze pertinent data from patient interview and chart in order to complete the total medical and clinical picture.
    5. Analyze clinical laboratory findings with sonographic images of the vascular structures.
    6. Correlate anatomical images of pathology of the vascular systems with clinical signs and symptoms.
    7. Correlate the sonographic characteristics with pathology of the vascular system.
    8. Combine laboratory findings, patient interview and sonographic findings to progress and complete sonographic examination before presenting the case to the interpreting physician.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sonographic characteristics of normal and abnormal anatomy of the extremity veins, carotid arteries and extremity arteries
    2. Scanning techniques of normal and abnormal structures of the vascular systems
    3. Patient interview, patient privacy and ancillary duties to the ultrasound examination
    4. Laboratory values indicating normal physiology of the vascular structures
    5. Other imaging modalities in addition to sonography used to image the vascular structures
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals and Student Clinical Manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • DMS 239 - Abdominal OB-GYN/Cardiac Ultrasound


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 207 , DMS 210 , DMS 235C  
    Co-requisites: DMS 237C  

    Description
    This course is for the ultrasound student specializing in Vascular Ultrasound and is designed to offer the student basic knowledge and understanding of Abdominal/OB/GYN and Cardiac Ultrasound. Scanning techniques will also be covered. Relevant histologic aspects of various pathological conditions will be discussed and correlated with their acoustical properties and sonographic characteristics. Clinical features and laboratory data of pertinent diseases will be presented. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the basic physiology of the abdominal, female pelvic, fetal and cardiac organs.
    2. List and explain the clinical symptoms and laboratory values appropriate to diseases of specific organs of the abdomen, fetus, heart and female pelvis.
    3. Identify the normal sonographic characteristics of the abdomen, female pelvis, fetus and heart.
    4. Describe the basic pathological diseases of the heart.
    5. Satisfactorily and safely perform the basic scanning techniques for selected lab activities pertinent to specific organs of the abdomen, female pelvis and heart.
    6. Apply proper scanning technique to perform basic fetal biometry.
    7. Apply proper scanning techniques to image normal cardiac and abdominal structures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Normal sonographic characteristics of the organs within the abdomen, female pelvis, fetus and heart
    2. Basic physiology and scanning protocols of the abdominal, female pelvis fetal and cardiac organs
    3. Scanning techniques of the abdomen, female pelvis, fetus and heart
    4. Basic pathology of the abdominal, female pelvic, fetus and cardiac organs
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, journals in the library and video tapes and CD’s in the DMS lab.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/11/2009


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  • DMS 246 - Cardiovascular Electrocardiogrm ECG/EKG


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DMS 104  or DMS 125  

     
    Description
    This course provides the student with the knowledge, skills and behaviors needed for competency in performing and interpreting Cardiovascular Electrocardiograms (ECG/EKG). Emphasis is on the anatomy of the heart, the conduction system and cardiac rhythms. The student will develop the skills needed for 12-lead ECGs/EKGs and 3-lead recording techniques, which include patient preparation, correct lead placement, mounting of strips and the care and maintenance of equipment and rhythm recognition. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare patient and equipment for testing providing patient safety, privacy and confidentiality.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of proper lead placement for 3-lead and 12-lead ECGs/EKGs.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of 3-lead and 12-lead ECG/EKG equipment and troubleshooting scenarios, including care and maintenance of equipment.
    4. Instruct patient about ECG/EKG procedures.
    5. Perform 3-lead and 12-lead ECGs/EKGs utilizing proper procedural guidelines and equipment.
    6. Identify cardiac rhythms obtained from the ECG/EKG exam.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cardiac anatomy and physiology
    2. Electrophysiology
    3. Waves and measurements for interpretation
    4. Sinus rhythms
    5. Atrial rhythms
    6. Junctional rhythms
    7. Heart blocks
    8. Ventricular rhythms
    9. Pacemakers and Holter Monitors
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, library resources, journals, videotapes and CDs located in DMS lab and lab equipment.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/10/2014


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  • DMS 282 - Vascular Ultrasound for Clinical Professionals


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Participants must be a credentialed sonographer working at a Community College of Allegheny County Diagnostic Medical Sonography clinical affiliate.

     
    Description
    This course consists of learning normal anatomy, sonographic characteristics and the hemodynamic principles of the peripheral vascular system, the cerebral vascular system and the vessels of the abdomen. Instrumentation, scanning techniques, audible signals made by normal and abnormal blood flow and vascular pathology are presented in this course. This course requires a per credit health
    career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Visualize the normal sonographic anatomy of the vascular system in the human body.
    2. Distinguish the abnormal sonographic characteristics of the vascular systems from normal vessels using 2-D scanning techniques. 
    3. Identify the abnormal hemodynamics of the human vascular system.
    4. Analyze the abnormal sonographic findings of the spectral Doppler waveform of the vascular system.
    5. Analyze the abnormal color spectral image of the vascular system.
    Listed Topics
    1. Normal anatomy of the vascular system
    2. Scanning techniques of the various systems
    3. Spectral and color Doppler
    4. Pathology causing abnormal hemodynamics of blood flow through the vascular system
    5. Scanning techniques and sonographic characteristics of pathology of the various vascular systems
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • DMS 283 - Cardiac Ultrasound for Clinical Professionals


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Participants must be a credentialed sonographer working at a Community College of Allegheny County Diagnostic Medical Sonography clinical affiliate.

     
    Description
    This course focuses on the ultrasonic investigation of the heart. Echocardiography is viewed from both an historical, as well as state-of-the-art perspective. The anatomy and physiology, particularly the cross-sectional anatomy of the mediastinal contents, are reviewed. Echocardiograms representative of normal cardiac anatomy are presented and compared with examinations performed by other diagnostic modalities. Procedural and scanning techniques are presented, as well as sonographic positioning unique to echocardiography.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the components of patient preparation as it relates to the echocardiographic examination.
    2. Scan standard 2-D views and the position and function of the cardiac anatomy.
    3. Transform images seen on 2-D echocardiography into M-Mode echocardiography.
    4. Expand images seen on 2-D echocardiography to incorporate color Doppler and spectral Doppler into echo exams.
    5. Identify the normal ECG/EKG pattern.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning and imaging techniques used in 2-D echocardiography
    2. Sonographic characteristics of the anatomic structures of the heart
    3. Principles and applications of transesophageal echocardiography, stress echocardiography and cardiac catherization
    4. Correlations of the role of echocardiography with the catheterization laboratory and the nuclear imaging laboratory
    5. Normal dimensions of heart structures and Doppler values
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • DMS 284 - Advanced Cardiac Ultrasound for Clinical Professionals


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Participants must be a credentialed sonographer working at a Community College of Allegheny County Diagnostic Medical Sonography clinical affiliate and completed DMS 255 or DMS 104 .

     
    Description
    This course is for ultrasound students specializing in echocardiography. Abnormal cardiac anatomy and physiology will be studied. M- mode, two-dimensional, continuous wave, pulsed wave, and color flow Doppler are correlated with pathologies. Echocardiographic tapes and case studies are presented and correlated with clinical features of cardiac pathology. Cardiac surgical procedures and pharmacology are studied.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compile appropriate echocardiographic images and data for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disorders including: coronary artery disease, acquired valvular heart disease, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiomyopathies, congenital heart disease and disease of the aorta.
    2. Scrutinize obtained echocardiographic data to assure that the exam was diagnostic for the written order of the exam.
    3. Correlate information obtained from 2-D imaging with quantitative m-mode and Doppler values to indicate pathology of the heart.
    4. Compile the quantitative and qualitative echocardiographic information to grade the severity of indicated cardiac disease.
    5. Generate a report page that accurately depicts the level of cardiac function.
    Listed Topics
    1. Abnormal cardiac anatomy and physiology
    2. Cardiac pharmacology
    3. Coronary artery disease 
    4. Valvular heart disease
    5. Endocarditis, pericarditis and myocarditis
    6. Cardiac masses
    7. Cardiomyopathies
    8. Congenital heart disease
    9. Diseases of the aorta
    10. Traumatic heart disease
    11. Cardiac embryology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • DMS 285 - Abdominal and Gynecological Ultrasound for Clinical Professionals


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Participants must be a credentialed sonographer working at a Community College of Allegheny County Diagnostic Medical Sonography clinical affiliate.

     
    Description
    This course presents an intense study of the abdominal, pelvic and fetal structures that can be evaluated employing ultrasound as an imaging modality. The student is provided with information concerning normal ultrasound appearance of tissues, organs and systems within the abdomen and pelvis. Ultrasound images representative of normal states are presented and correlated with examinations performed with other diagnostic modalities. Technical information such as procedural and scanning techniques are discussed throughout the course.  This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply scanning techniques to image the abdominal and pelvic structures. 
    2. Distinguish between the viscera of the abdomen and pelvis.
    3. Evaluate the normal sonographic characteristics of each organ within the abdomen and pelvis. 
    4. Correlate clinical symptoms and lab values to the appropriate diseases and conditions. 
    5. Correlate clinical symptoms and lab values of diseases and conditions to the appropriate ultrasound examination and to the sonographic characteristics of normal vs. abnormal structures. 
    6. Compare the ultrasound examination with Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine imaging. 
    7. Assess the size of anatomical structures with normal and disease states on sonograms.
    Listed Topics
    1. Scanning and imaging techniques of the abdomen and pelvis
    2. Sonographic characteristics of the anatomical structures of the abdomen and female pelvis
    3. Correlating sonograms with other imaging modalities
    4. Blood chemistry tests indicating pathology of specific anatomical systems or structures 
    5. Relating the size of anatomical structures with normal and disease states as seen on the sonograms 
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • DMS 286 - Advanced Abdomen and Small Parts Ultrasound for Clinical Professionals


    Credits: 5
    5 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Participants must be a credentialed sonographer working at a Community College of Allegheny County Diagnostic Medical Sonography clinical affiliate and completed DMS 260.

     
    Description
    Ultrasound images representative of disease states of organs and systems of the abdominal cavityand small parts are presented and correlated with examinations performed with other diagnostic modalities. Relevant histologic aspects of various pathological conditions are discussed and correlated with their acoustical properties and ultrasound characteristics. Clinical features, laboratory data and the pathophysiology of pertinent diseases are presented. This course requires a per credit health career fee; Check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will: 

    1. Synthesize the clinical signs and symptoms with pathology of the abdominal organs, thyroid, breast, parathyroid, scrotum and prostate.
    2. Evaluate the pertinent laboratory data relevant to pathological conditions of the following areas: abdominal organs, thyroid, parathyroid, breast, scrotum and prostate.
    3. Provide a differential diagnosis of liver pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    4. Provide a differential diagnosis of biliary pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    5. Provide a differential diagnosis of pancreatic pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    6. Provide a differential diagnosis of renal pathology using the sonographic characteristics of the disease and the clinical signs and symptoms. 
    7. Give a differential diagnosis of thyroid and scrotal pathology using the sonographic characteristics and the clinical signs and symptoms.
    8. Apply proper scanning technique to image the thyroid gland.
    Listed Topics
    1. Liver pathology 
    2. Gallbladder pathology 
    3. Renal pathology 
    4. Pancreatic pathology 
    5. Breast imaging; x-ray and ultrasound
    6. Prostate imaging 
    7. Scanning techniques of the thyroid, breast, scrotum and prostate
    8. Sonographic characteristics of pathology of the abdominal organs
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials as deemed appropriate by instructor
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 11/19/2019


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  • DMS 301 - Ultrasound Physics Registry Review, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Working Sonographer

     
    Description
    This is a course which combines theory and practice in ultrasound instrumentation and quality control. Topics include functions of the components of processing, scan converter displays, image and display techniques and methods of permanent image recording, ultrasound transducers, operating standards, equipment calibration, resolution, gray scale photography and image critique. Basic physics principles and test taking strategies will also be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the physics of waves as applied to diagnostic medical sonography.
    2. Describe artifacts and the limitations encountered in ultrasound imaging.
    3. Identify the components of real time scanners and explain their contribution to the ultrasound unit’s operation.
    4. Comprehend the Doppler Principle Theory and proper application.
    5. Identify proper Doppler modality selection and its applicationtowards diagnostic ultrasound.
    6. Scruitinize ultrasound images to evaluate for image artifacts.
    7. Assess potential for bioeffects in the use of ultrasound, if adequate safety practices are not followed.
    Listed Topics
    1. Physical characteristics of Ultrasound waves
    2. The Pulse-Echo Concept
    3. Transducers
    4. The physics associated with the ultrasound units sensitivity controls
    5. The pitfalls associated with artifacts in ultrasound imaging
    6. The potential for bioeffects in ultrasound imaging
    Reference Materials
    Textbook


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Developmental Studies

  
  • DVS 060 - College Academic Strategies


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Reading placement test
    Co-requisites: DVS 070  

    Description
    This course helps students acquire strategies essential for college study including taking classroom notes, developing time management skills, preparing for tests, organizing a notebook and developing communication skills. In addition, students learn basic research skills.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better in this course to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate effective note-taking strategies while reading texts and during lecture.
    2. Use metacognition to monitor learning and self-management.
    3. Apply appropriate communication skills in educational and professional settings.
    4. Explain effective priority management tools and strategies.
    5. Choose appropriate approaches to test taking to improve success.
    6. Develop a cohesive research project using the library’s resources.
    Listed Topics
    1. Priority management
    2. Study strategies
    3. Note-taking methods
    4. Self-management
    5. Research process and information literacy
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/22/2020


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  • DVS 070 - College Reading 1


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Reading placement test
    Co-requisites: DVS 060  

    Description
    This course provides instruction in basic comprehension and vocabulary skills. Students develop awareness of themselves as readers by employing metacognitive strategies. Additionally, students learn to identify and utilize organizational patterns and apply critical reading skills in making judgments about texts. DVS 070 will normally be followed by DVS 101  unless the student’s progress has been so accelerated in DVS 070 that the department advises against a subsequent course.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply metacognitive strategies essential to reading comprehension and recall.
    2. Identify context clues, word roots and reference materials to increase vocabulary.
    3. Use organizational patterns of writing for note taking and recalling main ideas and supporting details from various texts.
    4. Demonstrate critical thinking and critical reading skills while reading textbooks, supplemental selections and articles.
    Listed Topics
    1. Metacognitive strategies
    2. Active reading strategies
    3. Vocabulary development
    4. Patterns of organization and transitions
    5. Literal and critical levels of reading
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, reading enrichment programs, multi-media, reading laboratory materials, computer laboratory, library and adaptive software.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 10/22/2020


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  • DVS 101 - College Reading 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: DVS 070  (minimum grade “C”) or successful placement

     
    Description
    This course emphasizes the application of study and reading strategies that are initially presented in College Reading 1. Students are required to apply various study and reading strategies in understanding textbook and supplementary readings. The significance of experiential background for reading comprehension and the importance of identifying and responding to the author’s purpose for writing are emphasized. Students are encouraged to see reading, writing, and study as interconnected, interactive processes.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to use this course as a prerequisite.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply metacognitive comprehension and study strategies to college-level texts.
    2. Demonstrate critical thinking and critical reading skills with college-level texts.
    3. Utilize text features, structure, and organizational patterns to support comprehension.
    4. Employ vocabulary strategies, including structural analysis, context clues, and the use of reference materials. 
    5. Evaluate information sources and content using library resources.
    Listed Topics
    1. Metacognitive strategies
    2. Monitoring comprehension 
    3. Active reading techniques
    4. Refining study skills
    5. Vocabulary enhancement
    6. Problem-solving view of reading
    7. Information literacy skills
    8. Summarizing and reflecting through writing
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, reading enrichment programs, multi-media, reading laboratory, computer laboratory, library and adaptive software
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • DVS 103 - Advanced College Reading & Study Skills


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Reading placement test

     
    Description
    This course develops the specific college reading skills and learning strategies which will enable the student to read academic texts efficiently, effectively and independently. The course emphasis is on the transfer and practical application of comprehension, critical thinking, vocabulary, and study skills to college-level text material.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to pass the course or to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Employ metacognitive strategies when reading and studying college-level material.
    2. Apply critical reading and thinking strategies to texts from various disciplines.
    3. Produce notes and graphic organizers that successfully organize information from academic texts.
    4. Use vocabulary strategies to expand word knowledge and overall comprehension of college-level texts.
    5. Evaluate library resources.
    Listed Topics
    1. Metacognitive strategies
    2. Academic reading and study strategies
    3. Vocabulary enhancement
    4. Information literacy skills
    5. Critical thinking and reasoning skills
    6. Responding to texts through writing
    Reference Materials
    Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, reading enrichment programs, multi-media, reading laboratory, computer laboratory, library and adaptive software.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/23/2020


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Early Education & Child Development

  
  • ECD 101 - Intro to Early Education and Child Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides the student with an introduction to the history and trends in early education and child development. Students explore career options, professional expectations, and techniques for teaching, working and interacting with diverse populations of children and their families. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the scope of early education and child development including past and current trends.
    2. Describe career opportunities for working with children and their families.
    3. Describe the impact that changes in the family, workplace and society have on the field.
    4. Identify the diverse social, cultural, ethnic and racial needs of children and families.
    5. Express awareness of personal attitudes about differences, e.g., social, cultural, language, racial, religious and gender.
    6. Describe quality programs and settings for children and adolescents.
    7. Identify techniques and planning strategies for including children and adolescents with special needs.
    8. Describe methods of observing, recording and assessing behavior.
    9. Describe techniques for classroom management, guiding behavior and promoting self-discipline.
    10. Plan developmentally appropriate schedules, learning opportunities and environments.
    11. Identify strategies for communicating, involving and supporting families with children.
    12. Identify attributes of and strategies for successful teachers.
    13. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.

     Listed Topics

    1. Defining the field
    2. Joining the field, career options and opportunities
    3. Historical perspectives, influential people
    4. Societal changes impacting the field: family, workplace, society
    5. Diversity: meeting the needs of children and their families
    6. Attitudes and perceptions: the impact on children and families
    7. Essential attributes of successful teachers
    8. Communication skills, techniques for managing conflicts and problem solving
    9. Programs for children and adolescents
    10. Inclusion: modifying to meet the needs of exceptional children
    11. Basic teaching skills: observation and assessment, guidance and discipline, planning, setting goals and objectives, classroom management and conflict resolution
    Reference Materials
    Standard text and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 103 - Infant and Toddler Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an overview of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development from conception through toddlerhood. A range of theoretical viewpoints, research findings, and practical issues are considered within the context of the dynamic nature of development and the uniqueness of each individual child and family.  Professional standards for working with diverse infants, toddlers and their families are stressed.  A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic settings is required.  

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the development of infants and toddlers.
    2. Describe basic developmental concepts and issues related to infants and toddlers.
    3. Describe patterns of typical physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of infants and toddlers.
    4. Analyze the observed developmental patterns of infants and toddlers in group care settings.
    5. Identify strategies that facilitate physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of infants and toddlers in developmentally and culturally appropriate ways.
    6. Describe health and safety practices important to the development of infants and toddlers.
    7. Compare the developmental needs of infants and toddlers with the Pennsylvania Learning Standards for Early Childhood and the Pennsylvania Keys to Quality Continuum.
    8. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theories of child development related to the study of infants and toddlers
    2. Physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of infants and toddlers
    3. Observational techniques and assessment tools used with infants and toddlers as individuals and in groups
    4. Models of play environments and developmentally appropriate materials and activities for infants and toddlers
    5. Attachment, temperament and resilience
    6. Parenting and care-giving behaviors which promote optimal development
    7. Inclusion of infants and toddlers with special needs
    8. Working with infants and toddlers from linguistically diverse families
    9. Health and safety topics related to infants and toddlers, including nutrition and feeding issues, choking hazards, emergency preparedness, potentially hazardous materials, shaken baby syndrome and SUIDS
    10. Professional ethics, standards and practices
    Reference Materials
    Standard text and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 104 - Preschool Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an overview of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development during the preschool years, ages 3-6. A range of theoretical viewpoints, research findings and practical issues are considered within the context of the dynamic nature of development and the uniqueness of each individual child and family. Professional standards for working with preschool-age children and their families are examined. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic settings is required.  

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe basic developmental concepts and issues related to the study of preschool-age children.
    2. Describe patterns of typical physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of preschool-age children.
    3. Analyze the observed developmental patterns of preschool-age children in group care settings.
    4. Identify strategies that facilitate physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of preschool-age children in developmentally and culturally appropriate ways.
    5. Describe health and safety practices specific to the preschool classroom.
    6. Compare the developmental needs of preschool-age children with the Pennsylvania Learning Standards for Early Childhood and the Pennsylvania Keys to Quality Continuum.
    7. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theories of child development related to the study of preschool-age children
    2. Physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of preschool-age children
    3. The role of temperament and resilience in preschool-age children’s development
    4. Observational techniques and assessment tools used with preschool-age children as individuals and in groups
    5. Models of play environments and developmentally appropriate play materials and activities for preschool-age children
    6. Parenting and care-giving behaviors which promote optimal development
    7. Inclusion of preschool-age children with special needs
    8. Working with linguistically diverse preschool-age children and families
    9. Health and safety topics related to preschoolers, including nutrition, safe spaces, transportation safety, pedestrian safety, child abuse, prevention and control of infectious diseases and responses to allergic reactions to food and other allergens
    10.  Readiness and transition to kindergarten
    11.  Professional ethics, standards and practices
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 107 - Health and Safety of Children


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to promoting children’s health, safety, nutrition and physical development through informed practice.  Childhood illnesses and their care, Basic Life Support (BLS), first aid training and strategies for ensuring children’s health and safety in an early childhood setting are discussed. Nutrition and exercise needs of children birth to age 9 along with movement activities that facilitate coordination and lay the foundation for later academic success are examined. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify principles of child health maintenance, including nutrition, accident prevention, infection control and confidentiality.
    2. Apply principles of first aid to emergency situations and accidental injuries.
    3. Recognize common illnesses of infants and children.
    4. Describe the care of a child with a childhood illness in an early childhood setting.
    5. Identify principles of Basic Life Support (BLS).
    6. Identify the signs of emotional distress, child abuse and neglect.
    7. Recognize responsibility and procedures for reporting emotional distress, child abuse and neglect.
    8. Describe procedures (emergency and daily routine) to meet the needs and abilities of all children in a variety of settings.
    9. Identify the relationship between childhood nutrition, exercise and learning.
    10. Plan and demonstrate movement activities that promote physical coordination for children aged Birth to age 9.
    11. Identify community health agencies to be used as resources and referrals.
    12. Construct a NAEYC standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic needs of infants and children
    2. Promoting good health in child care, principles of infant child care and health maintenance
    3. Dental hygiene and care, illness prevention, infection control, hygiene and toileting
    4. Common illnesses of children, symptoms and care
    5. Nutrition, food safety and menu planning
    6. First Aid
    7. Basic Life Support (BLS)
    8. Providing safe environments, indoors/outdoors, accident prevention, child- proofing, emergency response procedures
    9. Childhood obesity, current research
    10. Movement and self-regulation research
    11. Developmentally appropriate movement activities
    12. Children with special needs, health, safety and adapting movement activities
    13. Recognizing emotional distress, abuse/neglect, responsibility and reporting procedures
    14. Confidentiality
    15. Building links with community health resources
    Reference Materials
    Standard text and multimedia materials
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 113 - Middle Childhood and Adolescent Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development from middle childhood through adolescence, ages 7 to early adulthood. A range of theoretical viewpoints, research findings and practical issues are considered in examining this period of development. The dynamic nature of development and the uniqueness of each individual child and the family with middle childhood aged children/adolescents are emphasized. Professional standards for working with 7-year-olds to young adults and their families are stressed. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Outline the development of individuals during middle childhood and adolescence.
    2. Identify basic developmental concepts and issues and their application to the development of middle childhood and adolescence.
    3. Describe patterns of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of middle childhood and adolescence.
    4. Assess individual developmental patterns of middle childhood and adolescence.
    5. Describe the physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of middle childhood in appropriate ways.
    6. Assess children in middle childhood through adolescence in their learning environments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Theories of child development related to middle childhood and adolescence
    2. Physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of individuals during middle childhood and adolescence
    3. Observational techniques used with individuals during middle childhood and adolescence
    4. Assessment tools for working with individuals during middle childhood and adolescence
    5. Drug and alcohol programs for school-age children and adolescents
    6. Peer socialization of school-age children and adolescents
    7. Sexual education for school-age children and adolescents
    8. Values conflict in school-age children and adolescents
    9. Before and after school programs
    10. Working with school-age children and adolescents with special needs and their families
    11. Working with culturally and linguistically diverse school-age children and their families
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 115 - Introduction to School Age Programs


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to the field of school-age care. Students explore professional expectations for the field, techniques for programming, teaching and working with school-age children and their families in out-of-school environments. Ten hours of field observation in an after-school/out-of-school setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance. This course is aligned with competencies required for the PA School Age Professional Credential.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define the field of school-age care.
    2. Describe the characteristics and needs of the school-age child.
    3. Identify techniques for communicating with school-age children and their families.
    4. Describe techniques for classroom management, guiding behavior and promoting self-esteem and self-discipline.
    5. Plan developmentally appropriate schedules, learning opportunities and environments for after-school/out-of-school programs.
    6. Identify indicators of quality for after-school/out-of school programs.
    7. Research managerial functions for organizing and managing after-school and out-of-school programs.
    8. Identify standards of ethical and professional practice.
    9. Develop a plan for school-age practitioner professional development.
    10. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based portfolio with appropriate artifacts.

     Listed Topics

    1. Defining the field
    2. The school-age child: characteristics and needs
    3. After school/out-of-school environments
    4. After-school/out-of-school curriculum and programming
    5. Guidance and communication techniques that promote social/emotional growth and development
    6. Working with parents and families
    7. School-age program management
    8. Professionalism and staff development
    Reference Materials
    Standard text; multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 130P - Practicum: Infant/Toddler


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 210   or permission of instructor
    Co-requisites: ECD 131  

    Description
    This course provides direct experience with children through supervised field placement in an early childhood setting. Students develop and apply skills in observation, interaction, empathy and acting in a professional manner. Students meet in a weekly seminar in addition to a 120-hour field placement where they interact with children, professionals in the field, and often parents.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

    1. Demonstrate the use of theories and research on social, emotional, physical and cognitive growth and development to guide interactions with infants and toddlers.
    2. Document in a professional manner the observations of the development and behaviors of infants and toddlers.
    3. Plan experiences and environments that address the individual development, temperament, interests and needs of each infant/toddler using observational and assessment data.
    4. Collaborate with the practicum supervisor, caregiving team and families.
    5. Employ ethical and professional practices in attitude, communication and behavior.
    6. Compile a portfolio that aligns with the NAEYC Standards and the I/ECMH Competencies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Observation and documentation techniques specific to infants and toddlers
    2. Confidentiality, ethics and professionalism including the importance of boundaries
    3. Collaboration and problem-solving with supervisor and caregiving team
    4. Assessment tools used when working with infants and toddlers
    5. Planning and implementing developmentally appropriate activities in typical inclusive settings
    6. Respectful and supportive interaction with families
    Reference Materials
    Trade books; OER; multimedia materials
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 131 - Reflective Supervision: Infant and Toddler


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 210 , or permission of instructor.
    Co-requisites: ECD 130P  

    Description
    This course provides an in-depth experience with reflective supervision, a critical component of working with young children. Taken in conjunction with ECD 130P Practicum: Infant and Toddler, students engage in extensive and ongoing written and oral reflection activities related to their practicum experiences. Students examine their own life experiences, attitudes, biases, interactions and problem-solving strategies as they develop the skills of self-awareness and responsive action. Group and individual coaching are included. Students are also guided in the preparation of their application for the Pennsylvania Family Associate in Infant Mental Health Endorsement (IMH-E®).

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.

    Co-registration in an infant/toddler practicum is required, based on the student’s course of study.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify ways to utilize constructive feedback to support meaningful interactions with children, families and co-workers.
    2. Analyze the role of the reflective practitioner in a field setting
    3. Ask for guidance from supervisors and co-workers using a variety of strategies.
    4. Integrate feedback and reflection to set personal short-term and long-term goals for working with young children and families.
    5. Document reflection of one’s own emotional responses over the course of the practicum experience.
    6. Create a final portfolio that documents work aligned with the Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health (I/ECMH) competencies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Reflective supervision and coaching models
    2. Feedback skills
    3. Reflective and responsive journaling
    4. Metacognition
    5. Asking for guidance
    6. Responses to supervision
    7. Professional goal-setting
    8. Nonverbal communication
    9. Cultural and linguistic sensitivity
    10. Infant/young child centered practices
    11. Relationship-based pedagogy
    12. Working with and supporting families
    13. National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) position statement on Developmentally Appropriate Practice
    14. NAEYC position statement on Equity in Early Childhood
    15. I/ECMH Family Associate Endorsement Competencies and application process
    16. Professionalism, including confidentiality
    17. Advocacy
    Reference Materials
    Trade texts, OER and multimedia materials
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 135P - Practicum: Observation and Assessment


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 45 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 101  

     
    Description
    This course examines effective methods for observing, assessing and documenting young children’s behavior for the purpose of planning developmentally appropriate curriculum, activities, environments and interactions. Students meet in a weekly seminar and obtain direct experience in observing and assessing children through a 45-hour supervised field experience in an early childhood setting, school, agency or therapeutic setting.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe methods of observation used in early childhood settings to assess children’s growth and development.
    2. Identify the value and uses of objective observational data.
    3. Analyze observational data of children’s behavior gathered using various methods.
    4. Apply appropriate theories of growth and development.
    5. Describe contemporary issues in assessment and guidelines for appropriate, authentic assessment of young children.
    6. Employ ethical and professional practice in written communications and interactions.
    7. Analyze assessment and observation data used in planning experiences and environments for children that reflect their interests, abilities and learning styles.
    8. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Definition of observation
    2. Purposes of observation: knowing and understanding children’s behavior and needs.
    3. Observational methods and techniques
    4. Documentation: collecting, recording
    5. Confidentiality, ethics and professionalism
    6. Definition of assessment
    7. Current trends in assessment
    8. Purpose of assessment
    9. Assessment tools, techniques and methods
    10. Interpreting observational and assessment information
    11. Using observation and assessment data for planning developmentally appropriate curriculum, environments, activities and adaptations in early childhood settings
    12. Communicating with families
    13. Working with other professionals
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECD 202 - Children With Special Needs


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is for students seeking an understanding of children with special needs. Special education past, present and future is examined. Included are topics related to working with children with sensory, behavioral, physical, language, cognitive and learning differences. The content of this course covers definitions, classifications, causes, incidence, approaches to treatment, social implications, attitudes, diversity, perceptions and professionalism. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify key events and legislative milestones that have impacted the field of special education. 
    2. Define the classifications of learners that are included in special education by identifying the characteristics of each.
    3. Explain teaching and treatment strategies for exceptional learners and why they are appropriate for specific learning differences.
    4. Identify the steps in the assessment, evaluation and IEP writing process.
    5. Describe the inclusive models of education and early intervention by identifying the role of the regular classroom teacher and parent in each.
    6. Describe the dynamics that might exist in a family with a child with special needs including ways in which the professional and community can support the child and family.
    7. Describe the transitions from birth through adulthood and how they affect the person with special needs.
    8. Analyze the impact of attitudes and perceptions on personal performance and development.
    9. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. History of special education and services for children with special needs
    2. Advocacy legislation and laws applying to children with special needs and their families
    3. Terminology of special education
    4. Disciplines involved in education and treatment, e.g., physical therapy, medicine, psychology and social work
    5. Inclusive education and other educational models
    6. Attitudes and perceptions and their impact on children and families
    7. Classifications of children with special needs
    8. Characteristics of children with special needs
    9. Educating gifted and talented children
    10. Multicultural and diversity issues in special education
    11. Effect of children with disabilities on family dynamics
    12. Changing role of teachers with inclusive education
    13. Transition from school to adult life
    14. Professionalism
    15. Community resources
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECD 209 - Introduction to Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: ECD 103  or permission of instructor

    Description
    This course introduces the growing field of infant and early childhood mental health (I/ECMH). It provides an in-depth examination of the theories, practices and structures which specifically support the positive social and emotional development of young children, from birth to age eight. Integrating theory into interactions with young children and their families to promote healthy relationships is a focus of the course. Ethical considerations and career opportunities are also discussed.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.

    A weekly field observation in infant/toddler and/or early childhood programs is required, based on the student’s course of study.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the role of relationships in promoting brain development.
    2. Describe how attachment, separation, trauma, grief and loss impact the social and emotional development of young children.
    3. Compare the characteristics of trauma-sensitive schools with the characteristics of developmentally appropriate practice as described in National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) position statements and I/ECMH best practice literature.
    4. Develop resources that support families in their efforts to provide safe, healthy and stable environments for their children.
    5. Identify ways that best practices for early childhood mental health can be integrated into home, classroom, agency and community settings.
    6. Analyze case studies involving a wide variety of child and family challenges impacting social and emotional development by using the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
    7. Relate NAEYC’s position statement on equity to the social and emotional development of economically, culturally and linguistically diverse children and families.
    8. Research the Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Endorsement process in Pennsylvania.
    9. Compile a portfolio that aligns with the NAEYC Standards and the I/ECMH Competencies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Attachment theory
    2. Brain development and stress
    3. ACES (Adverse Childhood Experiences)
    4. Resilience theory
    5. Trauma-sensitive schools
    6. Family substance use disorder’s impact on young children
    7. Early childhood mental health consultation
    8. Home visitation programs
    9. The role of federal, state and local laws and regulations in promoting mental health
    10. Infant/young child centered practices
    11. Relationship-based pedagogy
    12. Early childhood professional organizations, e.g., Zero To Three, Pennsylvania Association for Infant Mental Health (PA-AIMH), NAEYC, etc.
    13. Professionalism, including confidentiality
    14. Advocacy
    Reference Materials
    Trade texts, OER and multimedia materials
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 210 - Interaction and Prevention Skills With Children


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 209  or permission of instructor
    Co-requisites: ECD 202  or permission of instructor

    Description
    This course prepares students to intentionally support children’s social and emotional development/mental health in childcare, school, recreational, or therapeutic environments using evidence-based techniques and practices. Topics include addressing challenging behaviors across various age groups, promoting resilience through play and family-centered, relationship-based strategies, and using observation and assessment data to create prosocial learning opportunities. Students explore strategies in working with groups, the use of games and activities for learning and assessment, collaboration with family and other professionals and clinical observation skills.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.

    A weekly field observation in programs serving children birth to 36 months or preschoolers; or schools; agencies or other therapeutic setting is required based on the student’s specific course of study.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe typical social and emotional growth and development and its relationship with early childhood mental health.
    2. Identify protective factors for resilience and ways to promote them in infants, toddlers and children.
    3. Describe the role of relationships and play in early childhood mental health.
    4. Research curricula and approaches that target social and emotional development in children.
    5. Role play effective and empathic responses to children’s challenging behaviors and to caregiver concerns about these behaviors.
    6. Create a resource file with multiple evidence- and relationship-based strategies and activities that address challenging behaviors and promote social and emotional development in children.
    7. Implement a variety of strategies and activities that promote resilience with young children.
    8. Write reflective journals about the implementation of identified strategies with young children.
    9. Develop informational materials for parents that highlight specific strategies that they can use to nurture social and emotional development in infants, toddlers and young children.
    10. Exhibit professionalism and sensitivity in working with children who present social and emotional development challenges.
    11. Compile a portfolio that aligns with the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards and the Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health (I/ECMH) Competencies.
    Listed Topics
    1. Science of resilience
    2. Executive function skills
    3. Self-regulation
    4. Social and emotional learning programs, such as PATHS® , Tools of the Mind, and Conscious Discipline
    5. Play and social-emotional development
    6. Group dynamics
    7. Strategies for addressing challenging behavior
    8. Modifying the learning environment to support prosocial behavior
    9. Intentional application of games and activities to address identified needs
    10. Assessment of children’s play and behavior
    11. Professionalism, sensitivity and confidentiality
    Reference Materials
    Trade books, OER, and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 211 - Family Systems


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides a study of family relations in our society. Emphasis is on family values and expectations, as well as other social issues and how they influence the growth and development of the child. Included are issues of professionalism in dealing with diverse families, poverty, families in crisis, divorce, working parents, single parenting, ethnic, cultural and lifestyle differences, illness and death and the role of siblings and other relatives.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify key components of family relations and interactions.
    2. Describe perspectives of professional intervention and change.
    3. Explain ways in which family interactions influence and affect the child.
    4. Analyze demographics and statistics of modern family units.
    5. Describe the impact of different family values and morals on the development of children.
    6. Identify local, regional and national community resources for family support.
    7. Examine personal and cultural biases and differences that affect one’s ability to work effectively with children, families and other professionals.
    8. Construct a NAEYC standards-based educational portfolio and appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Family relations and dynamics
    2. Family characteristics and cultural background
    3. Family functions and values
    4. Influence of families, culture and communitites on the development of young children
    5. Parenting styles
    6. Socioeconomic Status and geographic location
    7. Families in Crisis
    8. Confidentiality and professionalism
    9. Communication techniques: Conflict management/resolution and problem solving
    10. Working with children and families to postively infuence children’s development and learning
    11. Community resources and family support
    Reference Materials
    Standard text and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 212 - Language, Literacy and Literature in Early Childhood


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 101  

     
    Description
    This course provides an overview of language and literacy development in young children, birth to age 9. The relationship between oral and written language is investigated. Students examine and evaluate a wide variety of quality literature that can be used to facilitate children’s emerging language and literacy skills. Developmentally appropriate strategies that address the PA Early Learning Standards for language and literacy, the role of teachers and parents in promoting communication, and early literacy and in creating print-rich environments are explored. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify examples of typical developmental progression of communication and language from birth to age 9.
    2. Describe developmentally appropriate strategies for promoting oral language and communication in young children.
    3. Examine major approaches to early literacy.
    4. Define key components of literacy development (e.g. print awareness, phonological and phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, story structure, comprehension, etc.)
    5. Classify a wide variety of children’s literature according to genre and picture book format.
    6. Apply criteria for selecting quality literature that is developmentally appropriate for different ages and learning outcomes.
    7. Describe ways of promoting and integrating literacy across the curriculum through play, learning centers and the arts.
    8. Plan developmentally and culturally appropriate literacy activities and environments to address the PA Early Learning Standards for children aged birth to 9 using a variety of teaching strategies.
    9. Demonstrate read aloud and storytelling skills.
    10. Design a model of a print-rich environment.
    11. Develop strategies for promoting family literacy based on recommended early learning standards and practices.
    12. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Typical progression of language and communication development
    2. Influences on language development
    3. The relationship between oral language and literacy development
    4. The role of imagery and representation in language and literacy development
    5. Scientifically-based literacy strategies for inclusive environments
    6. PA Early Learning Standards for Language and Literacy and Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening
    7. Genres of literature and picture book formats
    8. Children’s book authors and illustrators
    9. Selecting books for different ages and learning objectives
    10. Storytelling, read alouds, creative drama and movement and puppets
    11. Using the arts and play to promote literacy
    12. The developmental continuum of children’s writing
    13. Emergent and early reading and writing across the curriculum
    14. The role of parents in promoting literacy
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECD 214 - Curriculum for Early Childhood Classroom


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 101  or permission of instructor

     
    Description
    This course examines strategies and methods for preparing integrated curricula that facilitate learning and provide meaningful connections for young children. Students examine early childhood curriculum models and utilize the PA Early Learning Standards to plan, create and assess developmentally appropriate environments and experiences that include children of various ages, cultures and abilities. Using play, literacy and the arts as a foundation, emergent studies in mathematics, social studies, science and computers in the classroom are explored. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the importance of play for children’s development and learning.
    2. Compare and contrast the role of play and the creative arts in a variety of curriculum models.
    3. Analyze the effects of art, music, literature and play on child development.
    4. Describe appropriate art, music, movement and dramatic play activities for children at different age levels.
    5. Select play materials that facilitate learning for children at various ages and stages of development.
    6. Plan developmentally appropriate math, science and social studies activities (including field trips, community resources and activities) for young children by using the PA Early Learning Standards.
    7. Describe how to incorporate principles of early literacy development when planning math, science and social studies activities for young children.
    8. Incorporate a variety of planning, instructional and assessment strategies to enrichment, cultural and content area activities that include young children of various ages, cultures and abilities.
    9. Describe how to use documentation and assessment to explain children’s growth and learning through play to parents.
    10. Examine the impact of the media on young children’s development and creative expression.
    11. Discuss key issues related to the use of computers in the classroom.
    12. Describe the value of individual ability and creative expression.
    13. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Play, learning and developmentally appropriate practice (DAP)
    2. Early childhood curriculum models
    3. PA Early Learning Standards
    4. Instructional and assessment strategies
    5. Integrated curriculum development and planning methods
    6. Sensory centers and toys
    7. Creative expression: music, movement, drama
    8. Artistic development in children
    9. The development of mathematical concepts: number sense, patterning, geometry, data representation, measurement and problem-solving
    10. Scientific Method, Physical, Earth and Life Science experiences
    11. Social Studies, community resources and field trips
    12. Linking literacy with math, science, social studies and the arts
    13. Cooking with children
    14. Effects of television on children
    15. Technology in the classroom
    16. Outdoor play and environments
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbooks and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • ECD 218 - Child Care Management and Administration


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is for students who are interested in the day-to-day operation of managing a facility for young children. Students examine how to develop, organize, staff, maintain, fund and evaluate quality child care programs and classrooms. Topics include styles of management, supervision, diversity, developing interpersonal relationships with staff, planning and leading staff meetings, promoting positive staff relationships and professional development. A weekly field observation in early childhood programs, schools, agencies or therapeutic setting is required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify managerial functions necessary to administer a child care program.
    2. Obtain regulations and licensing requirements governing early childhood programs and facilities.
    3. Develop health, safety and nutrition guidelines and policies for use in an early childhood center.
    4. Create an enrollment procedure.
    5. Prepare a resource file of forms and policies for program administration.
    6. Identify community agencies as resources and referrals.
    7. Develop a proposal for operating a child care center including the following: philosophy, organizational chart, group size, configuration and schedule, budget, funding/income sources, purchasing plan, recruiting, advertising, hiring, staffing and payroll procedures, curriculum materials, equipment and resources.
    8. Apply standards and ethical practices of the profession.
    9. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. The need for planning and administration
    2. Assessing the diverse needs of families, children and community
    3. Determining the program base, philosophy and goals
    4. Organizational structure – regulations, policies, procedures, governance
    5. Managerial process, styles of management, developing interpersonal relationships
    6. Staffing: needs, recruiting, hiring, scheduling, maintenance, evaluating
    7. Supervision and leadership, coaching and promoting personal and professional staff development
    8. Publicizing the center
    9. Selecting, grouping and enrolling the children
    10. Planning space, purchasing equipment
    11. Finances, budgeting and record keeping
    12. Planning, scheduling and evaluating developmentally appropriate children’s programming
    13. Providing nutrition, health, safety and community resources/referral services
    14. Assessing, recording and reporting children’s progress
    15. Working with parents, volunteers and community
    16. Advocacy and professionalism
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbooks and multimedia materials
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECD 221 - Intro to Family Substance Use Disorder for Teachers, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    One in four children in the U.S. are living with family substance use disorder, also known as alcoholism and addiction. This class examines current scientific information about the family disease and its impact on children. It also explores ways that teachers can use brain-based strategies to develop resilience and social emotional competence in these children in the context of standards-based and developmentally appropriate classroom practices that meet the needs of all children.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify key findings of current research on the disease of substance use disorder.
    2. Describe the impact that SUD has on children of different ages.
    3. Identify primary protective factors related to resilience and how they support children’s development
    4. Plan a variety of learning activities that promote resilience in children while meeting academic standards across curricular domains.
    Listed Topics
    1. Current research on substance use disorder
    2. Impact of SUD on infants, toddlers, preschoolers, school-aged children
    3. Models of resilience
    4. Protective factors for resilience
    5. The role of play and story in promoting resilience
    6. Curricula that develop social and emotional competence
    7. Integration of SEL and resilience strategies into early childhood, elementary and middle-school classrooms
    Reference Materials
    As selected from current research and educational offerings.


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECD 240P - Practicum: Pre-K - 4


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 120 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: ECD 135P  

     
    Description
    This course provides direct experience with children aged birth to 9 years in a supervised early childhood program, school or therapeutic setting. Students record observations, plan and implement age-appropriate activities and refine professional skills. Students meet in a weekly seminar in addition to a 120-hour field placement where they interact with children, professionals in the field and parents.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply appropriate theories of growth and development.
    2. Document practical hands-on work experience with children, ages birth to 9 and their families.
    3. Document children’s behavior and development.
    4. Employ ethical and professional practice in attitude, behavior and communication.
    5. Demonstrate written and verbal competency in observation reporting.
    6. Plan experiences and environments for children that reflect their interests, abilities and learning styles using observation and assessment data.
    7. Construct National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Observational techniques
    2. Role and responsibilities of the student learner in a field experience setting
    3. Evaluation of student performance
    4. Interpersonal communication
    5. Confidentiality, ethics and professionalism
    6. Classroom management techniques
    7. Interaction with families and children
    8. Planning and implementing age-appropriate activities for children
    9. Assessment tools used when working with children
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook and multimedia materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECD 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/28/2009


    Course and Section Search



Economics

  
  • ECO 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the economic activity of the nation, introducing basic concepts and institutions. The emphasis is on aggregate income and spending, the government fiscal and monetary policy, national income accounting, economic growth and comparative economic systems.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Construct, label and interpret supply and demand curves.
    2. Categorize specific principles of unemployment.
    3. Compare and contrast the three types of inflation and explain the redistribution effects of inflation and deflation.
    4. Examine the roles government plays in the economy.
    5. Compare and contrast principles of national income accounting: GDP, NDP, NI, PI and DI.
    6. Break down and examine the tools of modern employment theory: e.g., MPC and MPS, investment instability and the multiplier effect.
    7. Examine the tools of monetary policy.
    8. Assess issues of the global economy, notably specialization and comparative advantage and multilateral trade agreements and free trade zones: e.g., NAFTA and the EU.
    Listed Topics
    1. The elements of supply and demand
    2. The issues of unemployment and inflation
    3. The role of the government in the economy
    4. National income accounting
    5. Fiscal policy
    6. Monetary policy
    7. International trade
    Reference Materials
    1. Textbook
    2. Study Guide
    3. Library
    4. Computer
    5. Small group discussion
    6. Audiovisuals

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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  • ECO 103 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the activities of individual economic units, such as industries, companies, households and consumers. The course emphasis is on markets, the price system and the allocation of resources as they affect the consumer, the producer and the economy.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Construct, label and interpret supply and demand curves including the concept of equilibrium.
    2. Explain the concept of elasticity of demand and supply; list and define the factors affecting elasticity of supply and demand; and develop and evaluate the coefficient of elasticity of demand.
    3. Examine consumer demand in relation to price and marginal utility as well as determine and demonstrate how to maximize consumer satisfaction.
    4. Diagram, define and articulate the concepts of costs and diminishing marginal returns.
    5. Identify and differentiate among the market structures of pure competition, monopolistic completion, oligopoly and pure monopoly; and determine how a firm in each market structure would maximize profits and minimize losses.
    6. Demonstrate how factors of production are utilized efficiently.
    Listed Topics
    1. Supply and demand
    2. Elasticity
    3. Consumer response to changing economic variables
    4. Costs of production
    5. Profit maximization in different markets
    6. Pricing of the factors of production
    Reference Materials
    1. Textbook
    2. Study guide
    3. Library
    4. Computer
    5. Small group discussion
    6. Audiovisuals

    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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Education

  
  • EDU 125 - Foundations of Middle Level and Secondary Education


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to middle level and secondary education including a study of current and past educational practices, historical changes and philosophies of education. Educational beliefs and elements of the teaching profession specific to grades 4-12, as well as the role of education in culture and society are examined. Objectives and methods of middle and secondary school education are also discussed. Ten hours of field experience throughout the semester are required.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance, and meet the local requirements of the field placement.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the requirements for Middle Level and Secondary Teacher Certification in Pennsylvania.
    2. Analyze different philosophies of education in order to write a personal philosophy of education statement.
    3. Describe funding, structure and curricular approaches in education for grades 4-12.
    4. Identify historical and contemporary issues in education and their impact on the 21st century learner.
    5. Construct an Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.

     Listed Topics

    1. Historical foundations of American education
    2. Philosophical foundations of American education
    3. Profession of teaching at middle level and secondary
    4. Societal influences on American education
    5. Curriculum models for grades 4-12
    6. Educational reform
    7. Governance
    8. Financing education
    9. Future trends in education
    10. Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and No Child Left Behind
    11. Multiculturalism and diversity in 21st century America
    12. Inclusion
    13. Classroom management
    14. Standards, accountability and high-stakes testing
    Reference Materials
    A current edition of a standard textbook recognized in the field or appropriate materials as prepared by the instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 130 - Behavioral Management in the Classroom


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course for classroom teachers and aides offers strategies for managing student behavior in the classroom setting. Approaches to preparation, organization and student engagement are examined as ways to avoid problems in the classroom. Also discussed are research-based strategies and practical techniques to use if problems do occur.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify strategies for classroom preparation and organization that will positively affect student behavior.
    2. Define the role of personality types and interaction styles in influencing student behavior in the classroom.
    3. Describe various classroom management techniques and give examples of when it is appropriate to apply them.
    Listed Topics
    1. Classroom management as it relates to student behavior
    2. Personality types
    3. Behavioral styles
    4. Influencing student behavior
    5. Various classroom management techniques and when to apply them
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 131 - Collaborating to Create a Learner-Centered Classroom


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will provide teachers and classroom aides with a better understanding of setting up the classroom, documenting student progress, reinforcing and enhancing learning, and making modifications and accommodations in the general classroom.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the collaboration involved in setting up a Learner-Centered classroom.
    2. Outline specific strategies and philosophies in creating a Learner-Centered classroom.
    3. Define and demonstrate modifications and accommodations to create Learner-Centered classrooms and explain their importance.
    4. Identify the different levels of accommodation and list some specific approaches and strategies used.
    Listed Topics
    1. Definition of a Learner-Centered Classroom
    2. Collaboration needed to create a Learner-Centered Classroom
    3. Philosophies related to a Learner-Centered Classroom
    4. Strategies to establish a Learner-Centered Classroom
    5. Modification and accommodations often needed to create a Learner-Centered Classroom
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 132 - Bully Prevention in Schools


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on creating a classroom climate in which all students feel safe. Topics include a review of the research on the causes and effects of bullying, direct and indirect bullying and best practices and strategies for meeting the underlying needs of bullies and victims.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the underlying causes of bullying.
    2. Identify classroom intervention strategies to use with bullies.
    3. Outline the different types of bullying behavior and the impact upon the victims.
    4. Demonstrate the support strategies to use with victims.
    5. Identify the core elements of a comprehensive school-wide approach to bullying.
    6. Develop a plan for creating a safe classroom environment.
    7. Encourage the development of school discipine policies related to bullying.
    Listed Topics
    1. Common misconceptions concerning bullies
    2. Direct bullying (open attacks, name-calling, threats)
    3. Indirect bullying (exclusion, isolation, rejection, gossip)
    4. The role of collusion in the bullying cycle
    5. Daily and weekly interventions to reduce bullying behaviors
    6. Identification of bullying “hot spots” at school
    7. Mechanisms to obtain and evaluate information on bullying behaviors
    8. Integration of responses to bullying into the school’s discipline policy
    9. Cyber bullying
    Reference Materials
    Currently recognized videos and handouts, classroom discussion and demonstrations.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 139 - Physical Restraints and other Non-Violent Forms of Intervention


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course offers classroom teachers and aides an overview of the hierarchy of interventions that may be used with students exhibiting disruptive behavior. Various models of physical restraint, as well as when and how these are appropriately employed, will also be addressed. Local laws and school policies pertaining to the use of physical restraint will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and define methods of indirect and direct methods of classroom intervention.
    2. Explain the appropriate uses and techniques for a variety of intervention techniques, including physical restraint.
    3. Examine and analzye local laws that govern the use of physical restraint.
    4. Identify school policies pertaining to the use of physical restraint.
    Listed Topics
    1. Classroom management
    2. Indirect and direct interventions in the classroom
    3. Types of interventions including physical restraints
    4. Local laws related to the use of physical restraints
    5. School policies related to the use of physical restraints
    6. Ethical considerations related to the use of physical restraints
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 140 - Teaching Children with Behavioral Disorders in a regular Classroom setting


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides the classroom teacher with information and strategies for teaching students who exhibit behavioral problems associated with attention deficit/hyperactive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorders, social maladjustment and behavioral problems associated with emotional disorders. These children often do not meet Pennsylvania standards for specially designed instruction and thus provide the regular education teacher with unique challenges. The course addresses specific educational and behavioral techniques which increase chances for student success in the regular classroom.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify characteristics of conduct disorders, oppositional/defiant disorder, attention deficit/ hyperactive disorder, social maladjustment and behavior problems associated with emotional disorders.
    2. Describe the Pennsylvania laws and standards for identifying students with special needs.
    3. Discuss challenges teachers have when working with students who exhibit behavioral disorders.
    4. Define techniques that can be used with students who have various types of behavioral disorders.
    5. Demonstrate sensitivity and understanding of children who have behavioral disorders.
    6. Discuss screening, pre-referral interventions and referral.
    Listed Topics
    1. Definition of behavioral disorders
    2. Characteristics of conduct disorders, oppositional/defiant disorder, attention deficit/hyperactive disorder, social maladjustment and behavior problems associated with emotional disorders
    3. Pennsylvania standards for identifying students with behavioral disorders
    4. Services provided for students with behavioral disorders
    5. Educating students with behavioral disorders in the regular classroom
    6. Alternatives for children with behavioral disorders that need more intervention than can be provided in the regular classroom
    7. Educational and behavioral techniques for teaching students with behavioral disorders
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 141 - Diverse Learners


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed for teachers and others who work with diverse populations in educational systems. The course will focus on a wide range of diversity including language, culture, socioeconomic status, learning styles and exceptionalities. Practical examples of differentiated and adaptive instruction will be presented for use in the classroom. The course will also explore the ways diversity can influence student learning.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an awareness of cultural, ethnic and socioeconomic diversity.
    2. Adapt instruction appropriate for culturally and linguistically diverse students.
    3. Discuss language, culture, family and community values and how they influence student learning.
    4. Develop strategies to improve access to curriculum in all content areas for students with limited English skills.
    Listed Topics
    1. Diversity
    2. Multiculturalism
    3. English Language Learners (ELL)
    4. Learning styles
    5. Differentiated instruction
    6. Adaptive instruction
    Reference Materials
    current edition of a standard textbook recognized in the field or appropriate materials as prepared by the instructor.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


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  • EDU 142 - Understanding Emotional Intelligence


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on the basics of helping students develop pertinent skills regarding Emotional Intelligence (EQ). Traditional IQ testing is not the best indicator of who will be successful in life. Rather, EQ has been shown to have a higher correlation with future achievement. Students will recognize and develop relevant skills pertaining to EQ. Students must learn to be optimistic, delay gratification, control anger, read social situations accurately and show empathy, which are skills that can be taught in a classroom setting.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define IQ and EQ.
    2. Compare and contrast IQ and EQ.
    3. Outline the relationship between EQ and future achievement.
    4. Name skills that coincide with EQ.
    5. List ways to assist students in acquiring EQ skills.
    Listed Topics
    1. IQ
    2. EQ
    3. Comparison between IQ and EQ
    4. Benefits of acquiring EQ
    5. Skills that compose EQ
    6. Assisting students with acquiring EQ skills
    7. Applying EQ skills to the classroom
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 143 - Working With Multiple Intelligence


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course will address the concept of Multiple Intelligence. Traditional learning stresses the development of verbal and problem-solving skills. Research has routinely shown that many students would benefit from a broader approach to education. The course will focus on ways to develop the proposed eight domains of intelligence: verbal/linguistic, visual/spatial, bodily/kinesthetic, logical/mathematical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, musical/rhythmic and naturalistic.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define Multiple Intelligence.
    2. Compare and contrast traditional learning vs. Multiple Intelligence.
    3. Cite and report research on multiple intelligence.
    4. Name and summarize the eight domains of intelligence.
    5. Plan an educational project that reflects each of the eight domains of intelligence.
    Listed Topics
    1. Definition of Multiple Intelligence
    2. Verbal and problem-solving skills
    3. Comparing and contrasting traditional learning vs. Multiple Intelligence
    4. Research on Multiple Intelligence
    5. Educational approaches to develop learning that is verbal/linguistic, visual/spatial, bodily/kinesthetic, logical/mathematical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, musical/rhythmic and naturalistic
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


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  • EDU 148 - Educator’s Role in Workforce Development


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides an overview of the changing aspects of workforce development and the role of educators in preparing the emerging workforce. Strategies for integrating career development into the curriculum will be presented. Participants will discuss “promising practices” and participate in the development of activities to introduce students to the workforce. The course will have components of interest for all educators: teachers, counselors, librarians, administrators and others.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss the components of the Workforce Investment Act as they impact K-12 education.
    2. Review the PA model for “Effective Practices for Career Preparation.”
    3. Analyze the significance of Business-Education partnerships in today’s educational process.
    4. Identify a variety of strategies to integrate career development into the curriculum.
    5. Construct a lesson and/or unit plan integrating career development into the school setting.
    6. Evaluate resources and strategies that link students with the current employment environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Effective practices for career preparation
    2. Workforce Investment Act
    3. Integrated lesson and unit planning of career development into a variety of curriculum
    4. “Promise practices”
    5. Career preparation activities
    6. Parent and community partnerships
    Reference Materials
    Current reference materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/21/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDU 155 - Humor in the Classroom


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course explores the use of humor as a method of creating an environment conducive to learning in a classroom or in other situations where growth and learning are the expected outcomes.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the importance of humor in a learning environment.
    2. Relate humor techniques to aspects of mental and physical health.
    3. Identify the range of human emotions, from happiness to sadness.
    4. Evaluate the appropriate use of humor in a classroom or any other environment to promote learning.
    5. Examine and analyze the examples of humor in literature, entertainment and politics.
    6. Develop lessons utilizing humor techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Definitions of humor
    2. Techniques of using humor
    3. Humor in literature
    4. Humor in politics
    5. Impact of humor on mental and physical health
    6. Techniques for inclusion of humor in teaching
    7. Impact of sensory input on learning
    8. Humor and the media
    9. Gender and ethnic humor
    Reference Materials
    No text book is required.
    Instructor developed handout materials.
    Access to Internet media.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


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  • EDU 202 - Educational and Assistive Technology


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Take one of the following: EDU 125  or ECD 101  or permission of the instructor

     
    Description
    This course is for students planning careers in education. Students examine how to use technology to assist diverse learners to meet designated learning outcomes. Students also learn to prepare and integrate a wide range of multi-media technologies as they develop standards-based instructional units. Students implement techniques for technology integration that address varied classroom populations. Ten hours of field experience are required throughout the semester.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define assistive technology and the ways in which it can meet the needs of students with sensory, behavioral, physical, language, cognitive and learning differences.
    2. Create traditional and new media for presentation and instructional purposes using the principles of instructional design.
    3. Evaluate the instructional quality of various types of instructional media, resources, and assistive technology for learners with varied needs.
    4. Describe the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology.
    5. Construct a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)/Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Media in teaching
    2. Assistive technology in education
    3. Technology integration
    4. Web-based resources
    5. Technology devices
    6. Software resources
    7. Web-enhanced, blended and online learning
    8. Current trends in technology
    9. Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology
    10. National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T)
    Reference Materials
    A current edition of a standard textbook recognized in the field or appropriate materials as prepared by the instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Information Literacy
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • EDU 205 - English Language Learners in the Classroom


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Take one of the following: EDU 125  or ECD 101  or permission of the instructor

     
    Description
    This course explores the role of the classroom teacher in meeting the academic needs of linguistically and culturally diverse learners. Topics include an introduction to language acquisition theory, cultural communication and learning styles, the role of culture in academic achievement and cultural and linguistic bias in instructional strategies, materials and assessment. Ten hours of field experience are required throughout the semester.

    Students must have three current clearances: FBI Fingerprint Clearance, a Pennsylvania State Police Criminal History Clearance, and a Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance and meet the local requirements of the field placement site, including the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) Verification Clearance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify federal, state and local laws and regulations impacting the education of dual language learners.
    2. Describe the process of acquiring multiple languages and literacy skills, including the general stages of language development and language structures, functions and variation.
    3. Examine sociocultural characteristics of different populations of English Language Learners (ELLs) including values, educational background and demographics, and how these may impact academic and language development.
    4. Compare and contrast dominant instructional and assessment models pertaining to ELL instruction.
    5. Adapt specific materials, activities and lessons to meet the needs of ELLs.
    6. Construct an National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)/Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards-based educational portfolio with appropriate artifacts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), No Child Left Behind and the ELLs
    2. The process and structures of language acquisition
    3. Common terms and organizations associated with dual language learners such as: World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA), Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), English as a Second Language (ESL), bilingualism, etc.
    4. Sociocultural characteristics of ELLs
    5. Cultural communication styles
    6. The role of culture in academic achievement and language acquisition
    7. Theories and models of instructing ELLs such as: immersion, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP), ESL, etc.
    8. Academic vs. social language
    9. Cultural and linguistic bias in instruction and assessment
    10. Technology and the ELL
    11. Cross-cultural competence and communication in community systems supporting the ELL
    Reference Materials
    ELL textbook that includes access to observational opportunities via media or website access (e.g. My EducationLab).
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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Electrical & Electronic Engineering Technology

  
  • EET 103 - Introduction to Electronics


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course covers the basic principles of electronics, with a survey of charge, voltage, current and resistance, DC & AC distribution systems, Ohm’s Law and power formulas, series/parallel circuits, Kirchhoff’s Laws, RC, RL and RLC circuits, time-dependent behavior, and an introduction to operational amplifiers, timers and other circuit elements. Theory is applied to laboratory work with a concentration on construction and testing of actual circuits and the use of modern measurement techniques, culminating in the execution of a design project. No previous experience in electronics or science is required.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the methods employed in basic DC and AC circuit analysis.
    2. Convert common electrical quantities by formulating unit conversions with scientific notation.
    3. Develop engineering problem-solving skills through practical laboratory projects.
    4. Employ methods of charging a capacitor with a constant voltage source and the transient charging current in a series RC network.
    5. Apply the concepts of basic diodes and transistors using modern linear integrated circuits.
    6. Employ the application of electronic vocabulary to communicate within the manufacturing community. 
    7. Design, build and test electronic solutions to real-world problems independently and collaboratively.
    8. Synthesize documentation of electrical designs using schematics and data tables appropriately.
    Listed Topics
    1. Current and voltage: electrical charge, current, voltage and power
    2. Ohm’s Law: application of Ohm’s Law, power relations, V-I characteristics
    3. Series and parallel network: Kirchhoff’s Current Law, Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law, voltage divider rule, current divider rule
    4. Complex circuit analysis: general strategy, three and four resistor combinations, Wheatstone Bridge
    5. Time varying signals: describing time varying signals, generating time varying signals, average and RMS values
    6. Capacitors: principles of operation, parallel and series connection, typical applications, charging a capacitor with a constant voltage source, discharging a capacitor
    7. Operational amplifier: integrated circuits, op-amp as a voltage comparator, op-amp as a voltage amplifier, negative feedback, voltage follower, applications
    Reference Materials
    Approved Instructor textbooks, internet resources and supplemental materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


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  • EET 130 - Introduction to Telecommunications


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: EET 103  

    Description
    This course provides an overview of basic principles of electronic circuits and their applications to telecommunications. Topics include amplifier circuits and analysis, audio circuits, tuned Radio Frequency (RF) amplifiers, oscillator circuits, receiver circuits and AM and FM modulation. Microwave and satellite communications are introduced.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze series and parallel resonant circuits by calculating resonant frequencies.
    2. Describe electromagnetic radiation and the concept of a carrier.
    3. Explain the function of a tuner and how it receives different frequencies.
    4. Demonstrate the operation of an oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer.
    5. Explain amplitude, frequency and phase modulation and the techniques of modulation and demodulation.
    6. Describe pulse communications techniques and frequency division multiplexing.
    7. Describe the process of communications in a shared medium, including carrier sense multiple access with collision detection.
    8. Measure energy loss of the fiber optic cable.
    9. Explain the concepts of fiber optics and laser technology.
    10. Construct a radio detector for amplitude modulation and frequency modulation using transistors and integrated circuits.
    11. Explain how regulations impact the technical function of communications systems in both licensed and unlicensed environments.
    12. Apply appropriate operating procedures for amateur radio in compliance with a Federal Communications Commissions Technician class license.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction and review: DC and AC electrical circuits, capacitive and inductive reactance
    2. Elements of communication: basic communication systems, the telephone and telegraph, electromagnetic radiation, concept of a carrier
    3. Elements of radio communication: antenna grounding system, the tuner, the reproducer, need for detection waveform analysis
    4. Amplitude modulation systems: amplitude modulation analysis, modulation factor, AM spectrum and bandwidth, amplifier and noise, receiver sensitivity and selectivity
    5. Sideband systems: AM transmission, transmission power, suppressed carrier, single sideband, vestigial sideband, SSB receiver
    6. Frequency and phase modulation: FM generation, FM spectrum and bandwidth, FM transmitter and receiver, FM stereo
    7. Pulse communication techniques: sampling theorem, pulse amplitude, duration, position, and phase modulation, delta modulation and frequency-division multiplexing
    8. Fiber optics and lasers: light as a carrier, light transmission in a glass, construction and characteristics of optical fiber and introduction to laser light
    9. Phase locked loop (PLL): introduction to PLL, phase detectors, the 555 timer, the complete PLL and op-amp, application of PLL, touch-tone decoder
    10. Ethernet, carrier-sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) and access controls used in computer networking
    11. Government regulations for broadcast, telephony and cable television transmissions, including public utilities. 
    12. Amateur radio standards, practices and body of knowledg
    Reference Materials
    Approved Instructor textbooks and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EET 179 - Electrical Power Distribution


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 103  

     
    Description
    This course covers industrial wiring techniques, standards and applications as per the National Electrical code. Students will learn electrical print reading and translation to the necessary wiring panels. Techniques of wiring electrical panels, and terminals with proper color coding and labeling methods are covered. Laboratory will offer the opportunity to practice these and other skills of electrical maintenance.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the function of an electrical print, electrical panel or terminal block, wire number labels.
    2. Run wires between panels as per electrical prints.
    3. Terminate wires at panels and terminal blocks.
    4. Label and secure wires in bundles.
    5. Wire motors as per electrical prints.
    6. Describe proper use of hacksaw, pipe vise, bench vise, bender and deburring tool.
    7. Demonstrate proper cutting, bending and terminating conduit.
    8. Describe three different types of insulation used on wire and give typical application of each.
    9. Describe use of a bus bar.
    Listed Topics
    1. Control Wiring Methods
    2. Wiring of Electrical Controls
    3. Conductors
    4. Disconnect Devices
    5. Overload Protection Circuits
    6. Raceways
    7. EMT Conduit Bending
    8. Conduit Sizing
    9. Wire Pulling Techniques
    10. Use of Metal Pipe
    11. Use of Plastic Pipe
    12. Use of Flexible Pipe
    Reference Materials
    Use of multimedia systems in Center of Excellence to certify skill assessment. Texts are Industrial Electrical Wiring, Power Distribution and Piping Systems
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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  • EET 201 - Electronics 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 103  

     
    Description
    This course delineates the principles and use of discrete electronic devices such as bipolar and field effect transistors,triac and silicon controlled rectifiers. Students will apply these devices to basic circuits such as small signal and power amplifiers and power control systems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe semiconductor theory concepts and identify solid-state devices.
    2. Employ the techniques and methods to analyze and design rectifiers.
    3. Explain the operations of diodes and transistors in electronic circuits.
    4. Apply industry standard software in analyzing electronic circuits.
    5. Generate and plot frequency response graphs of voltage amplifiers.
    6. Use semiconductor concepts in troubleshooting and design of electronic circuits.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction: voltage and current sources, Thevenin’s Theorem, Norton’s Theorem
    2. Semiconductors: conductors and semiconductors, silicon crystals, the unbiased diode, forward and reverse biased
    3. Diode theory: the diode curve, the ideal diode, the second and third approximation, load lines
    4. Diode circuits: the input transformer, the half-wave and full-wave rectifier, the bridge rectifier, the capacitor input filter, surge current, design guidelines, diode applications
    5. Special purpose diode: the Zener diode, the loaded Zener regulator, optoelectronic devices, the varactor, LED design guidelines
    6. Bipolar transistor: the unbiased transistor, transistor currents, the base and collector curve, cutoff and breakdown, the transistor model
    7. Transistor fundamentals: the load line and the operating point, the transistor switch, emitter bias, LED drivers, transistor current source
    8. Transistor biasing: voltage divider bias, VDB analysis, two supply emitter bias, PNP transistors
    9. AC models: coupling capacitor, bypass capacitor, small signal operation, AC resistance of the emitter diode, CE amplifier, AC model of the CE amplifier
    10. Voltage amplifiers: highlights of a CE amplifier, voltage gain, predicting voltage gain, swamped amplifier, cascaded stages, output impedance, cascaded stages, the Thevenin Method, common base amplifiers
    11. Power amplifiers: the AC load line, limits on signal swing, class A operation, transistor power rating, AC saturation and cutoff, AC output compliance, thermal resistance
    Reference Materials
    Approved Instructor textbooks and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


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  • EET 202 - Electronics 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 201  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuing study of Electronics 1 and its applications. Emphasis will be on power amplifiers, differential amplifiers, junction gate field-effect transistors (JFETs), metal oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thyristors. Detailed analysis of linear op-amp circuits and their applications will be presented. Popular linear integrated circuits (IC) and timers will be covered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Employ techniques to analyze and design differential and power amplifiers.
    2. Identify JFET and Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) transistors and describe their function.
    3. Describe thyristors and their operations.
    4. Make use of the concepts of electronic theory in troubleshooting and design of electronic circuits.
    5. Define the concepts in the design of active filters, oscillators and timers.
    6. Use Electronics Workbench and Multisim simulators in the design and analysis of electronic circuits.
    Listed Topics
    1. Emitter follower: CC amplifier, voltage gain, maximum unclipped output, cascading CE and CC, class B operation, improved voltage regulation
    2. Power amplifiers: the AC load line, class A operation, transistor power rating, AC output compliance, thermal resistance
    3. Field-effect transistors (FET): the biased JFET, drain curves, the transconductance
    4. FET circuits: self-bias circuit, graphical solution of self-bias, JFET amplifiers, JFET analog switch, other JFET applications
    5. Thyristors: the four-layer diode, the silicon controlled rectifier, bidirectional SCR, the unijunction transistor
    6. Frequency: frequency response of an amplifier, input and output coupling capacitor, emitter bypass capacitor, high-frequency bipolar analysis, decibels and bDm, power and voltage gain, bode plot
    7. Op-amp theory: integrated circuits making IC, the differential amplifier, common mode gain, the current mirror
    8. More op-amp theory: small and large signal frequency response, power bandwidth, op-amp characteristics, popular op-amps; other linear ICs
    9. Linear op-amp circuits: voltage controlled voltage source (VCVS) sallen and key active filters, low-pass 1st and 2nd-order active filter, high-pass 1st and 2nd order active filter, band-pass 2nd-order active filters, multiple-feedback active filter design
    10. Oscillators: theory of sinusoidal oscillation, the Wien-Bridge oscillator, other RC oscillator, the Colpitts oscillator, the 555 timer
    Reference Materials
    Approved Instructor textbooks and materials
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EET 213 - Electronic Instruments


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of instrumentation for the measurement of  current, voltage, power and impedance. Q capacitance and inductance at low frequencies will also be studied.
    Learning Outcomes
    Select and explain the use of appropriate instruments to make measurements of all electronic properties, such as resistance, voltage, current, wave shape characteristics, impedance and logic levels. Employ a systematic approach to troubleshooting an electronic circuit, including the selection of measuring techniques used to locate the lowest repairable module. Describe, in both verbal and written modes, the repair problem under consideration and the means used to locate and solve the problem. Read and break down schematics of electronic circuits. Locate appropriate electronic components and draw new schematic
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


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  • EET 240 - Electrical Power/Motors


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MIT 210  or Equivalent

     
    Description
    This course delineates the application of electrical theory and the use of electrical machinery and equipment. Direct current motors, generators and alternating current machinery, such as transformers, single-phase motors, polyphase and induction motors are studied. Typical motor control devices, such as Diode for Alternating Current (DIAC), Triode for Alternating Current (TRIAC) and Silicon Control Rectifiers (SCR) are also covered.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze linear voltage regulators and calculate the percentage of the voltage regulation of the power supply.
    2. Compare and contrast the differences and similarities of electric and magnetic circuits.
    3. Analyze and design magnetic circuits, such as lifting magnet, both in English and System International.
    4. Calculate the percentage of voltage regulation and efficiency for both generators and motors.
    5. Analyze the operations of automatic motor speed control.
    6. Solve problems for motors, generators and transformers at the engineering technology level.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to magnetism and magnetic circuits: similarities between magnetism and electricity, nonlinear effects of ferromagnetic materials, series and series/parallel magnetic circuits
    2. Principles of voltage and torque generation: voltage induced in a conductor, voltage induced by a coil, force produced by a conductor, Lenz’s Law, torque developed by a conductor, back electromotive force (counter emf)
    3. DC machine construction: armature, interpoles, compensating winding, field poles, mechanical structure, armature windings
    4. DC generator characteristics: basic generator equation, separately excited generator, voltage regulation, generator efficiency, series, shunt and compound generator, parallel operation
    5. DC motor characteristics: basic motor equation, back emf, speed regulation, motor efficiency, series, shunt and compound motor, permanent magnet motor, starting and stopping a DC motor
    6. Control of direct-current motors: techniques of speed control, automatic speed control, computer speed control using an SCR
    7. Transformers: review of single phase AC circuits, basic transformer theory, practical single-phase transformer, voltage regulation, efficiency, multiple-winding transformer, auto-transformer, review of three-phase AC theory, three-phase transformer
    8. Single-phase motors: single-phase induction motors, split-split-phase, shaded pole and capacitor-start motor, series motor, single-phase synchronous motor, characteristics
    9. The three-phase induction motor: construction, rotating field concept, theory of operation, speed relationship, analysis of rotor behavior, efficiency, typical characteristics, starting techniques
    Reference Materials
    Approved Instructor textbooks and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/28/2010


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EET 245 - Electric Motor Control


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EET 103  

     
    Description
    This course covers the wiring of AC and DC motors for industrial power. Application and troubleshooting of starting circuits, overload protection circuits, and emergency stop circuits, including with maintenance and repair, will be covered. The use of test instruments, such as digital multimeters, will be presented. Laboratory work will emphasize skill building in wiring industrial scaled circuits.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List the 10 rules of electrical safety.
    2. Describe best practices in lock-out/ tag-out procedures.
    3. Connect a dual voltage three phase motor for low voltage operation.
    4. Connect a dual voltage three phase motor for high voltage operation.
    5. Connect and operate a manual motor control circuit.
    6. Describe the operation of a control transformer .
    7. Troubleshoot a reversing motor control circuit.
    8. Wire and operate a timer relay
    Listed Topics
    1. Safety
    2. Lock-out/ tag-out
    3. Operation of single phase power
    4. Operation of three phase power
    5. Time delay fuses
    6. Five functions of motor control
    7. Motor starter circuits
    8. Overload circuits
    9. Transformers
    10. Test instruments
    11. Motor reversal circuits
    12. Time delay circuits
    Reference Materials
    Use of multimedia systems in Center of Excellence to certify skill assessment. IST Texts for Electrical Motor Control 1 and 2.
     
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


    Course and Section Search



Electrical Construction Technology

  
  • ECT 100 - Introduction to the Electrical Construction Industry


    Credits: 4
    2 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is designed for students enrolled in the Interim Credential Electrical Apprenticeship Program (ICEAP) through the Electrical Training Alliance (ETA).  The course material covers the content included in the first year of a 5-year Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee (JATC) program.  The course includes 2,000 hours of on-the-job training at a participating JATC.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    1. Apply algebra and basic functions in the context of the electrical industry.
    2. Explain basic electrical direct current (DC) theory.
    3. Describe how to read, measure and interpret blueprints.
    4. Justify the need for health and safety training for electricians.
    Listed Topics
    1. Algebra and basic functions
    2. Reading comprehension
    3. Financial literacy
    4. Basic electrical DC theory
    5. Occupational Safety and Health Administration 10 hour training
    6. First aid/cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    7. Introduction to the National Electrical Code
    8. Job preparedness
    9. Reading, measuring and interpreting blueprints
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and material(s), electronic devices/Internet resources/Learning Management Systems (LMS).
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • ECT 101 - Electrical Construction Technology 1


    Credits: 8
    4 Lecture Hours 8 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the ECT Program

     
    Description
    This course will provide the basis of a student’s knowledge in the Electrical Construction Technologies program.  First year apprentices at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local #5 will learn theories and practices as they are presented in the Electrical Training Alliance (ETA) curriculum for student’s in the first year.  In addition to the core outcomes of this course, additional topics available through the ETA may also be covered at the IBEW’s discretion.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the use and proper care of basic tools of the electrical trade.
    2. Explain building wire construction and installation properties.
    3. Identify Ohm’s Law’s relation to voltage, current, resistance, and power.
    4. Distinguish series and parallel components of combination circuits.
    5. Calculate component values.
    6. Employ basic and advanced techniques in conduit bending with manual and mechanical tools.
    7. Apply the National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements on the job.
    Listed Topics
    1. Code, standards and practices
    2. Conduit fabrication
    3. Direct current (DC) theory
    4. Job information
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and material(s), electronic devices/Internet resources/Learning Management Systems (LMS).
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/01/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECT 151 - Electrical Construction Technology 2


    Credits: 8
    4 Lecture Hours 8 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ECT 101  

     
    Description
    This course will expand on topics learned in ECT 101  .  Second year apprentices at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local #5 will learn theories and practices as they are presented in the Electrical Training Alliance (ETA) curriculum for student’s in the second year.  In addition to the core outcomes of this course, additional topics available through the ETA may also be covered at the IBEW’s discretion.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the principles of magnetism and electromagnetism and transformer operating principles. 
    2. Create real transformer connections on the transformer simulator.
    3. Explain the importance of avoiding drug use.
    4. Summarize the IBEW constitution, local union by-laws and parliamentary procedure.
    5. Describe fundamental practices for creating a safety-related work environment.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
    7. Interpret residential blueprints.
    8. Draw residential blueprints.
    9. Identify the inductance and capacitance effects of inductors and capacitors in series or parallel, especially in relation to alternating current (AC) circuits.
    10. Analyze series, parallel and combination AC circuits.
    11. Compare direct current (DC) to AC systems
    Listed Topics
    1. AC systems
    2. AC theory
    3. Blueprints
    4. Code and practices
    5. Codeology
    6. Electrical safety-related work practices
    7. Transformers
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and material(s), electronic devices/Internet resources/Learning Management Systems (LMS).
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/01/2018


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  • ECT 201 - Adv Electrical Construction Tech 1


    Credits: 8
    4 Lecture Hours 8 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ECT 151  

     
    Description
    This course will expand on topics learned in previous courses.  Third year apprentices at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local #5 will learn theories and practices as they are presented in the Electrical Training Alliance (ETA) curriculum for students in the third year.  In addition to the core outcomes of this course, additional topics available through the ETA may also be covered at the IBEW’s discretion.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Position circuits on a blueprint.
    2. Estimate job cost to include takeoffs, blueprint specifications, schedules and component location and blueprint systems integrations.
    3. Summarize overcurrent protective devices (OCPDs) and their characteristics, operation and sizing, conductor tap rules, calculation of currents and ground fault protection of equipment.
    4. Determine when energized work is justified.
    5. Identify the appropriate protective equipment for energized work.
    6. Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts of grounding and bonding.
    7. Explain physical principles, safety considerations and common practices involved in hoisting heavy loads.
    Listed Topics
    1. Alternating current (AC) theory
    2. Blueprints
    3. Code and practices
    4. Electrical safety-related work practices
    5. Grounding and bonding
    6. Rigging, hoisting and signaling
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and material(s), electronic devices/Internet resources/Learning Management Systems (LMS).
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/01/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • ECT 251 - Adv Electrical Construction Tech 2


    Credits: 8
    4 Lecture Hours 8 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ECT 201  

     
    Description
    This course will expand on topics learned in previous courses.  Fourth year apprentices at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local #5 will learn theories and practices as they are presented in the Electrical Training Alliance (ETA) curriculum.  In addition to the core outcomes of this course, additional topics available through the ETA may also be covered at the IBEW’s discretion.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize differences in residential, commercial and industrial blueprint specifications.
    2. Calculate mathematical solutions for National Electrical Code (NEC) related issues.
    3. Demonstrate grounding of separate buildings and structures, grounding for electrical systems, grounding for separately derived systems and special occupancies and equipment.
    4. Manipulate manually, mechanically and automatically operated control devices.
    5. Interpret schematic, wiring, logic and ladder diagrams.
    6. Employ motor nameplates, alternating current (AC) alternators, three-phase motors and squirrel cage motors.
    7. Install motors to meet NEC requirements.
    Listed Topics
    1. Blueprints
    2. Code calculations
    3. Grounding and bonding
    4. Motor control
    5. Motors
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and material(s), electronic devices/Internet resources/Learning Management Systems (LMS)
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 02/01/2018


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  • ECT 291 - Electrical Construction Technology Mastery


    Credits: 8
    4 Lecture Hours 8 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: ECT 251  

     
    Description
    This course will expand on topics learned in previous courses.  Fifth year apprentices at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local #5 will learn theories and practices as they are presented in the Electrical Training Alliance (ETA) curriculum.  In addition to the core outcomes of this course, additional topics available through the ETA may also be covered at the IBEW’s discretion.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate proper use of common instruments, sensors, transmitting and controlling devices and systems.
    2. Prepare telecommunications equipment and systems, including computer networking and terminations.
    3. Modify building control systems and power networks, including security systems, initiating devices and advanced lighting controls.
    4. Perform splicing techniques for fiber optic cabling, including heat splicing and fusion splicing machines.
    5. Produce digital programming for motor controls, including conveyors and heating/ventilation controls.
    Listed Topics
    1. Instrumentation
    2. Teledata
    3. Building automation
    4. Fiber fusion splicing
    5. Programmable logic control
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbooks and material(s), electronic devices/Internet resources/Learning Management Systems (LMS).
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 01/24/2019


    Course and Section Search



Electrical Distribution

  
  • EDT 103 - Overhead Lineworker Maintenance 1


    Credits: 5
    2 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: EDT 107  

    Description
    This course will provide an overview of electrical transmission and distribution systems. The course focuses on the recognition, safe application and care of necessary tools and equipment. Students gain knowledge necessary to pass the commercial driver’s license permit test.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Select proper pole climbing equipment and tools.
    2. Butt test inspect a pole for safety.
    3. Sharpen climbing hooks.
    4. Climb and work on a pole.
    5. Tie six basic knots.
    6. Identify the uses of helper tools.
    7. Use different types of wire cutters.
    8. Use preforms, anchors and wire sleeve sizes.
    9. Interpret transmission and distribution standards for poles.
    Listed Topics
    1. Set poles
    2. Safety procedures in climbing
    3. Fall protection
    4. Learning to climb
    5. Six basic knots
    6. Sharpening hooks
    7. Butt testing
    8. Helper tools
    9. Wire usage
    10. Wire and sleeve sizes
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 105 - Overhead Lineworker Maintenance 2


    Credits: 5
    2 Lecture Hours 9 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 103  

     
    Description
    This course will provide the knowledge and skills required to properly install three phase primary and secondary conductors. Students will learn the proper installation of overhead and underground residential service lines.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Operate a truck mounted bed winch.
    2. Demonstrate the loading and unloading of poles.
    3. Operate a line truck to set poles.
    4. Operate hydraulic equipment.
    5. Pull overhead guys.
    6. Demonstrate the installation of line anchor and tension guy.
    7. Splice conductors on ground.
    8. Install stringing blocks and rollers.
    9. Properly sag primary conductors.
    10. Install secondary spreaders and secondary cable.
    Listed Topics
    1. Truck mounted bed winch
    2. Rigging
    3. Load and unload poles
    4. Assemble hardware on poles
    5. Pull overhead guys
    6. Installing anchors
    7. Sag secondary cables and clamps
    8. Perform tasks necessary to install service at house
    9. Cover secondary
    10. Assemble 8 foot arms –single and double
    11. Frame poles on ground
    Reference Materials
    Duquesne Light’s Performance Manual For Electrical Lineworkers (Selected chapters)
    Distribution Tools book, T & D instruction manual, Accident Prevention Manual, T & D Heavy Equipment Operators Manual, Worker Order, Standards Manual, Sherman and Reilly Catalog.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 107 - Compliance and Safety Training


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: EDT 103  

    Description
    This course will provide essential knowledge of Federal and State regulations as they relate to work in the electric utility industry. Areas covered will include personal protective equipment, rescue procedures, work area setup, flagging and proper environmental practices.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the personal protection equipment for head, foot, hearing, eyes, and face.
    2. Perform vehicle flagging operations in a work area using Penndot safety requirements.
    3. Safely use glove and sleeve protection in high voltage applications.
    4. Perform a bucket truck rescue.
    5. Perform an enclosed space rescue and atmospheric monitoring.
    6. Recognize fall protection equipment.
    7. Perform standard first aid and CPR.
    8. Recognize ground fault circuit interrupters.
    9. Recount requirements for spill cleanup and OSHA Hazard Communication requirements.
    10. Name substation entry procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Personal protective equipment
    2. Rescue procedures
    3. First Aid/CPR
    4. OSHA Hazard Communications
    5. Work area protection
    6. Penndot flagging
    Reference Materials
    Duquesne Light’s Performance Manual For Electrical Lineworkers (Selected chapters), Duquesne Light Power Delivery Safety Manual, 29CFR1910
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 109 - Basic Electricity


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) in electrical fundamental concepts and circuit analysis. Topics include voltage, current, resistance, impedance, Ohm’s law, power, circuit reduction, Kirchoff’s network analysis methods, network theorems, capacitors, inductors, transients and sine wave characteristics.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify elementary physical situations.
    2. Use algebra in solving basic physics problems.
    3. Distinguish between elementary physics situations that require a mathematical interpretation from those that do not.
    4. Explain physics phenomena.
    5. Apply theoretical concepts of physics in the conduction of laboratory experiments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Units of measurement
    2. Kinematics, dynamic and laws of motion
    3. Work and energy
    4. Momentum and collisions
    5. Rotational motion
    6. Temperature, heat and thermodynamics
    7. Electricity and magnetism
    8. Mechanical and sound waves
    9. Light and optics
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 203 - Overhead Lineworker Maintenance 3


    Credits: 4
    1 Lecture Hours 9 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 105  

     
    Description
    This course will provide students with the knowledge and specialized skills necessary to troubleshoot and repair electrical transmission and distribution systems. Skills development will focus on proper pulling, tensioning and installation of electrical cables.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate operation of a winch truck.
    2. Assemble equipment arms for distribution systems.
    3. Demonstrate operation of a load lift bucket.
    4. Operate a conductor tensioner machine.
    5. Operate a take-up reel.
    6. Prepare transformers for use.
    7. Install transformers.
    8. Install compression connectors.
    9. Assemble brackets for pole and arm mounted cutouts.
    10. Assemble 3-phase equipment arm with brackets and braces.
    Listed Topics
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Winch truck operation
    2. Conductor tensioner machine operation
    3. Take up-reel operation
    4. Load lift bucket operation
    5. Transformer preparation usage
    6. Transformer operation and installation
    7. Compression connectors installation
    8. Assembly of brackets for pole and arm mounted cutouts
    9. Assembly of 3-phase equipment arm with brackets and braces
    10. Assembly of equipment arms for distribution systems
    Reference Materials
    Duquesne Light’s Performance Manual For Electrical Lineworkers (Selected chapters)
    T & D Standards, T & D Equipment & Various gages, T & D Splices & Connector Manual, Circuit maps, Safe T & D Standards Manual, T & D Equipment Manual, T & D Instruction Manual, T & D Heavy Equipment Operator’s Manual
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 204 - Underground System Maintenance


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 103 , EDT 105  

     
    Description
    This course will familiarize the student with the underground network system and the function of the low and high tension electrical equipment found within the system. Specific topics will include print reading, enclosed space safety procedures, identification of tools and basic work procedures.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify various types of underground cables and splices.
    2. Identify basic manhole tools and equipment.
    3. Tie knots in the underground.
    4. Read underground duct maps.
    5. Set up and rig equipment for pulling wires, pulling end and feed ends.
    6. Install t irons and steps.
    7. Identify tools found in a splicer’s tool pan.
    8. Melt and lower lead and filler compound.
    Listed Topics
    1. Lead sleeving preparation
    2. Underground cables identification
    3. Underground cable splices, lines, and devices identification
    4. Basic manhole tools and equipment identification
    5. Tying knots in the underground
    6. Duct map reading
    7. Rig pulling end
    8. Rig feed end
    9. Splicer’s tool pan
    10. Melt and lower lead and filling compounds
    Reference Materials
    Duquesne Light’s Performance Manual For Electrical Lineworkers (Selected Underground System chapters) Maintenance Manual and other related documents
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 205 - Basic Substation Maintenance


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 6 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 103 , EDT 105  

     
    Description
    This course will familiarize the student with the function of low and high tension electrical equipment found in an electrical substation. Specific topics of study will include print reading, proper names, safety procedures, basic maintenance tasks, basic construction tasks, test procedures and the operation of testing equipment, as well as high tension switching and clearance procedures.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and explain the operations of substation equipment.
    2. Define key electrical substation terms.
    3. Define and complete substation permits.
    4. Identify the various symbols on a single line electrical diagram.
    5. Interpret single line electrical diagrams.
    6. Explain operating and clearance procedures.
    7. Read substation panel voltmeter, ammeters, wattmeters and KVA meters.

     Listed Topics

    1. Basic substation safety procedures
    2. Basic substation equipment
    3. Print reading (single line and RT)
    4. Proper operating names and breaker codes
    5. Clearance and switching procedures
    6. Meters and their uses
    Reference Materials
    Duquesne Light’s Performance Manual For Electrical Lineworkers (Selected chapters) Substation Operation Manual and other related documents
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 206 - Meter Training


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides insight to the various types of residential and commercial revenue meters, both single phase and 3 phases. It also identifies safe installation, removal and troubleshooting practices associated with revenue metering.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the operation of wattmeter, KVA meter and power factor meter.
    2. Recognize the difference in 3 phase and 1 phase meters.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of various meter sockets and meters for single and three phase power.
    4. Explain the use and application of current transformers and potential transformers in metering electrical power.
    5. Demonstrate proper connection and disconnection of meters from their sockets.
    6. Illustrate the tests and checks made before meters are installed.
    Listed Topics
    1. Residential service, bases and wiring
    2. Meter sockets
    3. Basic KW meter
    4. Network meter
    5. Specialty meters, overview of operation
    6. Meter connects and disconnects
    Reference Materials
    Duquesne Light’s Performance Manual For Electrical Lineworkers (Selected chapters), Duquesne Light Meter Technician Manual, Electrical Essentials for Powerline Workers
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 207 - AC Power


    Credits: 3
    2 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 109  

     
    Description
    This course is a study of the effects of inductance and capacitance in series and parallel circuits. Students will learn single-phase and three-phase alternating current (AC) power characteristics. Topics include single-phase and three-phase transformer operations, phase-to-phase and phase-to-neutral voltage, current and power factors.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define basic terms of electricity.
    2. Apply Ohm’s law to series circuits and parallel circuits.
    3. Use meters to measure voltage, current and resistance safely.
    4. Explain power, power factor and efficiency in electrical circuits.
    5. Determine the impendence in AC circuits.
    6. Write electrical symbols.
    7. Recognize the difference between AC and DC electricity.
    8. Reproduce sine wave characteristics of AC electricity.
    9. Explain the differences between single and three-phase electrical circuits.
    10. Explain uses of current and potential transformers.
    11. Name different three-phase power systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Basic electrical safety
    2. Units and electrical notations
    3. Current, voltage and resistance
    4. AC and DC voltages
    5. Series and parallel circuits
    6. Ohm’s law and power
    7. Power factor
    8. Phase rotation, KVA, KVAR, KW and power transformers
    9. Single and three-phase electrical transformer systems
    10. Energy and circuit protection
    11. Current and potential transformers
    12. Capacitors, inductors and impedance
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 208 - Fund of Switching and Clearing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 207  

     
    Description
    This course will provide students with the knowledge and specialized skills necessary to perform the tasks associated with switching and or clearing electrical utility equipment on overhead, underground, or substation systems.  Skills development will focus on reading and interpreting various schematics, identifying the capability and limitations of various electrical components and gaining an understanding of utility work practices associated with establishing safety clearances.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate ability to interpret symbols associated with circuit maps, operating single line diagrams and other electric utility schematics.
    2. Define requirements for establishing safety clearances for electric utility workers based on industry standards.
    3. Define capabilities and limitations of standard overhead, underground, and substation equipment that are operated to provide electric utility safety clearances.
    4. Identify equipment required to provide an adequate safety clearance for crews to perform work given a specific scope of work or known failure.
    5. Demonstrate ability to correctly apply proper naming conventions for equipment, communication protocols and requirements associated with 3-Part Communication.
    6. Define requirements for clearance procedures on distribution, sub-transmission and transmission equipment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Symbol interpretation
    2. Requirements for establishing safety clearances
    3. Capabilities and limitations of standard overhead, underground and substation equipment
    4. Adequate safety clearance equipment
    5. Proper naming conventions associated with 3-Part Communication
    6. Clearance procedures on distribution, sub-transmission and transmission equipment
    Reference Materials
    Various manuals and procedures supplied by DLC.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 220 - Electrical Distribution Technology Internship 1


    Credits: 3
    200 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 103 , EDT 105  

     
    Description
    This internship is part of the Electrical Distribution Technology certificate.  The internship will provide an opportunity for “hands on” experience with all the skills and knowledge gained in the courses of the program.  Students will spend 40 hours per week for the duration of the internship.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Install cross arms on utility poles.
    2. Repair broken electrical conductors.
    3. Install utility poles.
    4. Perform Pennsylvania Department of Transportation flagging in work areas.
    5. Collaborate with experienced lineworkers as a team.
    Listed Topics
    1. Recognition, safe application and care of tools, materials and equipment
    2. Groundwork necessary for installation of the system
    3. Installation of three phase primary and secondary conductors, overhead and underground service lines
    4. Troubleshooting and repair of the systems
    5. Construction and maintenance of a high voltage distribution system
    Reference Materials
    Students will utilize texts, manuals, and instruction sheets, along with work orders and job specification sheets.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 221 - Electrical Distribution Technology Internship 2


    Credits: 3
    200 Practicum Hours

    Prerequisites: EDT 203  

     
    Description
    This internship is the last phase of the Electrical Distribution Technology certificate.  The internship will provide an opportunity for “hands on” experience with all the skills and knowledge gained in the courses of the program. Students will spend 40 hours per week on the job for the duration of the internship.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Install cross arms on utility poles.
    2. Repair broken electrical conductors.
    3. Install utility poles.
    4. Perform Pennsylvania Department of Transportation flagging in work areas.
    5. Collaborate with experienced lineworkers as a team.
    Listed Topics
    1. Recognition, safe application, and care of tools, materials and equipment
    2. Groundwork necessary for installation of the system
    3. Installation of three phase primary and secondary conductors, overhead and underground service lines
    4. Troubleshooting and repair of the systems
    5. Construction and maintenance of a high voltage distribution system
    Reference Materials
    Students will utilize texts, manuals, and instruction sheets, along with work orders and job specification sheets.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/10/2017


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDT 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Jacobs, Diane Date Approved: 06/10/2016


    Course and Section Search



Engineering Drafting & Design

  
  • EDD 100 - Blueprint Reading


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is a survey of engineering practices, problems, specifications and drawings. Emphasis is placed on the reading of blueprints. Other topics include quantity take-offs of areas and volumes of excavation, volume of reinforced concrete, surface area of concrete form work, mechanical and electrical problems, types of structures, structural shapes and connection.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Interpret architectural plans for residential and commercial buildings.
    2. Develop and utilize residential and commercial construction practices.
    3. Use freehand drawings and pictorial representations to communicate.
    4. Use reference sources to analyze blueprint drawings.
    5. Prepare take-offs and estimating volumes of concrete excavations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Freehand sketching
    2. Introduction to architectural plans
    3. Projections
    4. Dimensions
    5. Light framing
    6. Floor plans
    7. Plot plans
    8. Roof framing plans
    9. Details and schedules
    10. Piping and plumbing
    11. Heating and air conditioning
    12. Materials used in construction
    13. Fire protection
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/01/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 101 - Engineering Drawing 1


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This is a course in basic drafting techniques used to produce engineering drawings. Conventional drafting and dimensioning practices as outlined by the National Occupational Skill Standards, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) will be used to produce orthographic drawings, pictorial drawings, auxiliary views and section drawings. Technical drawings will be completed using freehand sketching techniques, conventional drawing tools and CAD.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the types of lines used in technical drawings and technical sketches.
    2. Identify the basic tools used by drafters.
    3. Create sketches of both two and three dimensional objects using correct sketching methods.
    4. Sketch the primary views of an orthographic drawing in proper orientation and alignment.
    5. Draw the six standard views of an object using proper conventions, placement and alignment.
    6. Describe the concept of sectional views.
    7. Explain the purpose of cutting-plane lines.
    8. Describe the difference among multiview projection, axonometric projection, oblique projection and perspective drawings.
    9. Create an isometric drawing and an oblique drawing.
    10. Prepare a fully annotated engineering drawing using conventional dimensioning techniques as required by the ANSI and ISO drafting standards.
    11. Explain the difference between aligned and unidirectional dimensioning systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. The graphic language
    2. Sketching
    3. Lettering
    4. Drawing tools
    5. Orthographic projection
    6. Geometric constructions
    7. Section views
    8. Auxiliary views
    9. Dimensioning and drawing annotation
    10. Pictorial drawing
    11. Computer generated drawings
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 102 - Engineering Drawing 2


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 101  

     
    Description
    This course is designed to provide a graphical means of solving problems involving true measurements, linear or angular and the solution of spatial relationships of point, lines and planes by means of projection. The course begins with a review of single and multiple auxiliary views and continues with the four basic constructions of descriptive geometry. Emphasis will be placed on complex intersections and surface developments to generate 2D and 3D computer generated surface models.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Label points, lines and planes using standard descriptive geometry notations.
    2. Draw the visibility of two non-intersecting lines given two views.
    3. Classify a line as an inclined line, oblique line or normal line given three views of a line.
    4. Determine the true length of a given line in space.
    5. Determine the true angle between two planes.
    6. Determine the true size and true shape of a given plane in space.
    7. Determine the true distance between two lines in space.
    8. Solve development problems for prisms, cylinders, cones and pyramids using parallel line techniques and radial line techniques.
    9. Use triangulation to solve for transitions between two geometric shapes.
    10. Draw the intersection between any combination of lines, planes, prisms, cylinders, cones and pyramids.
    Listed Topics
    1. Review of basic drafting concepts
    2. Introduction to descriptive geometry
    3. Descriptive geometry problem solving concepts
    4. Points, lines and planes
    5. Intersections and piercing points
    6. True distances
    7. Developments
    8. True size of planes
    9. Solid models
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 120 - Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting


    Credits: 4
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This is an introductory course in computer-aided drafting fundamentals. Students will be introduced to the concepts and techniques used by drafters and designers to create and modify computer generated drawings. Students will learn the commands and functions necessary to input, process and output working drawings to printers and plotters.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use Windows Explorer to copy, move, delete and rename a drawing file.
    2. Prepare new AutoCAD drawings by setting the drawing environment to include the paper size and inserting a border and title block.
    3. Produce CAD drawings using the screen cursor, absolute coordinates, relative coordinates, polar coordinates and direct distance entry for point entry.
    4. Complete CAD drawings using drawing commands.
    5. Modify CAD drawings using editing commands.
    6. Utilize hatching tools to fill in surfaces.
    7. Produce hard copy prints of completed CAD drawings.
    8. Manage drawing layers.
    9. Add text, linear, angular, diameter and radius dimensions to CAD drawings.
    10. Create orthographic and isometric CAD drawings.
    11. Use the PLINE command to draw polyline objects.
    Listed Topics
    1. The CAD environment
    2. Input/output devices
    3. Operating and CAD software
    4. Basic drawing commands
    5. Coordinate geometry
    6. Editing commands
    7. Multiview drawings
    8. Geometric constructions
    9. Solids, fills and isometric drawings
    10. Hatching
    11. Text and lettering
    12. Dimensioning and drawing annotation
    13. Polylines
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 121 - Computer-Assisted Drafting Applications


    Credits: 4
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 120  

     
    Description
    This course is a continuation of the study of computer generated graphics. Students will develop advanced skills in computer-based drawing by creating working drawings for engineering applications. These drawings include orthographic projection concepts, section views, tolerancing and dimensioning, notes, schedules and symbols lists. Drawings will be created using computer graphic and AutoCAD software.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Construct orthographic drawings using different layers, colors, line types and line weights specified by the ANSI standards.
    2. Select plotting devices and modify plotting device configurations to produce hard copy of completed CAD drawings.
    3. Use object snap modes and advanced drawing commands to create precision drawings.
    4. Use the AREA command to calculate the area of an object by adding and subtracting objects.
    5. List data related to a single point, an object, a group of objects or an entire drawing.
    6. Create text and dimension styles.
    7. Use dimensioning commands to dimension a drawing to accepted drafting standards.
    8. Describe the purpose for and proper use of layouts.
    9. Manipulate layouts.
    10. Prepare layouts for plotting.
    Listed Topics
    1. File handling
    2. Basic drawing commands
    3. Orthographic drawings
    4. Geometric constructions
    5. Inquiry commands
    6. Dimension styles
    7. Tolerance dimensioning applications
    8. Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing applications
    9. Scaling
    10. Layouts and view ports
    11. Architectural drawing applications
    12. Mechanical drawing applications
    13. Metric drawing applications
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 135 - Introduction to Parametric Modeling


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the development of 3-dimensional engineering design models using a feature-based modeling environment. The techniques of constructing, editing and annotating feature-based parametric models will be presented. The application of design variables to parametric features will be used to automate the design and revision process. Projects in the development and presentation of computer-generated parametric models using AutoDesk Inventor software will be completed in the Engineering Graphics and Analysis laboratory.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create an extruded parametric model using dimensional constraints, geometric constraints and parametric equations.
    2. Edit parametric dimensions.
    3. Add placed features to a parametric model including holes, cut features, fillets and chamfers.
    4. Identify symmetrical features in design to create a parametric model using the revolved feature.
    5. Create a parametric model using the loft and shell tools.
    6. Perform history-based part modifications using the browser.
    7. Define the eight geometric constraints to create a fully constrained sketch using geometric constraints.
    8. Use projected geometry on a newly created work plane.
    9. Create a drawing layout for a standard size drawing sheet, complete with border and title block using pre-defined drawing sheet formats.
    10. Create fully annotated standard orthographic drawing of a parametric model including a base view, projected views, dimensions and center lines.
    Listed Topics
    1. Design and parametric modeling
    2. The modeling environment
    3. Three dimensional space
    4. Parametric modeling fundamentals
    5. Parametric constraints fundamentals
    6. Symmetrical features in design
    7. Part drawings and associative functionality
    8. Parent/Child relationships, the “Base Orphan Reference Node (BORN)” technique
    9. Assembly modeling
    10. Model presentation
    11. Model annotation and documentation
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 141 - Structural Drafting


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 121  

     
    Description
    This course emphasizes design drawing and detailing of steel structures. Topics include columns and base plates, beams, structural arrangement drawings, connection details and shop drawings using CAD. Both bolted and welded connections are designed and detailed using American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC)standards.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Draw the assigned structural steel shapes as specified in the AISC manual.
    2. Prepare a structural steel framing plan according to specifications including notes, dimensions and loads needed for the preparation of shop drawings by the structural detailer.
    3. Prepare a connection detail of a beam to beam and beam to column bolted connection.
    4. Prepare shop drawings of beams and columns for a given structural steel framing plan.
    5. Calculate the end reactions of a simple beam having uniform loads using the AISC Manual of Steel Construction and of a simple beam having concentrated loads.
    6. Identify the eight basic parts of an American Welding Society (AWS) standard weld symbol.
    7. Draw a standard weld symbol according to given criteria.
    8. Draw an anchor bolt plan for a given structural steel framing plan.
    9. Calculate the diameter and number of high strength bolts needed in single shear and double shear simple beam connections using the AISC manual
    10. Define the terms beam, reactions, moment and equilibrium.
    11. Sketch examples of uniform loads and concentrated loads.
    Listed Topics
    1. Overview of structural drafting
    2. Structural symbols and drafting conventions
    3. Structural shapes and sizes
    4. Standard gauges and dimensions
    5. Simple parts plan
    6. Fasteners in shear/bolt sizing and selection
    7. Calculating end reactions
    8. Framing plans
    9. Connection details
    10. Shop drawings: beams
    11. Shop drawings: columns
    12. Erection plans
    13. Anchor bolt plans
    14. Bill of materials
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 150 - Introduction to Architectural Modeling


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the development of computer aided 3-dimensional architectural models using a feature based modeling environment. The techniques of constructing, editing and annotating feature-based parametric models will be presented. Projects in the development and presentation of computer generated parametric models, using state-of-the-art modeling software such as AutoDesk Revit, will be completed in the Engineering Graphics and Analysis laboratory. Emphasis is on developing basic parametric skills in residential architectural design and drawings.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the process of modifying and personalizing the Revit user interface.
    2. Develop a project environment using predefined and global settings.
    3. Create views using predefined templates.
    4. Create dynamically linked schedules to include walls, doors and windows.
    5. Create levels (horizontal planes) and grids (vertical planes).
    6. Define various wall types using the element properties dialog menu.
    7. Create floors and roofs using the modeling tools.
    8. Operate modeling tools to insert doors and windows into a floor plan.
    9. Use the stair tool to design stairs and railings and place into a 3-D architectural model.
    10. Operate the floor plan features tool to place components such as furniture and plumbing fixtures to a 3-D architectural model.
    11. Create annotated construction drawings including plans, elevations, schedules and detail drawings.
    12. Create presentation drawings including plans, elevations and rendered perspective drawings.
    Listed Topics
    1. Lines, shapes and editing tools
    2. Rectilinear and curved objects sketching
    3. Overview of design basics
    4. Interior and exterior walls
    5. Basement floor plans, designing stairs
    6. Roof designs
    7. Ceiling systems and placing lighting fixtures
    8. Interior and exterior elevations
    9. Building and wall section views
    10. Bathroom and kitchen design layouts
    11. Schedule creations
    12. Interior and exterior rendering
    13. Construction documentation sheets
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 221 - Parametric Modeling 2


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 135  

     
    Description
    This is an advanced course in the development of 3-dimensional engineering design models using AutoDesk Inventor feature-based modeling software. Students will construct part models using advanced modeling tools. The creation of part models will be used to produce fully annotated detail drawings and assembly drawings, assembly models and animated presentation assemblies. The application of design variables to parametric features will be used to automate the design and revision process.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Construct assembly models from existing parts using assembly constraints.
    2. Place standard fasteners from the content library into an assembly model.
    3. Prepare fully annotated working drawings, including assembly drawings, detail drawings and parts lists.
    4. Create a parametric model using the sweep tool.
    5. Use the Inventor Studio to generate a rendered image of an assembly model.
    6. Create an animated exploded assembly model.
    7. Generate a part model using dimension variables linked to a spreadsheet to control parametric parameters.
    8. Apply decals to parts using the decal tool.
    9. Create embossed and engraved parts.
    10. Apply threads to a hole and a shaft using the thread tool.
    11. Apply tolerance dimensions to mating part models.
    Listed Topics
    1. Advanced modeling tools
    2. Extrusions, sweeps and lofts
    3. Text and emboss tools
    4. Decal tools
    5. Reference dimensions
    6. Revision tables
    7. Model assembly
    8. Assembly constraints
    9. Part libraries and catalogs
    10. Adaptive parts and parametric relations
    11. Assembly drawing creations
    12. Assembly drawing annotation
    13. Parts list
    14. Exploded assemblies
    15. Animations
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 222 - Customizing the CAD Environment


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 120  

     
    Description
    This is an advanced course presenting techniques for operation, programming and management of computer-aided drafting environments. Topics include menu creation and modification, software modification and creation of macros, library creation and file management. Emphasis is on creation of customized environments for efficient use in specific engineering areas such as electrical, architectural and mechanical fields.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create a new line type definition to a given set of parameters.
    2. Create a new hatch pattern definition to a given set of parameters.
    3. Modify the ACAD.PGP file to a given set of parameters to include external commands and alias command definitions.
    4. Produce template drawings using a given general set of parameters.
    5. Generate script files using the text editor to set the drawing parameters.
    6. Create a new toolbar with a minimum of 10 buttons.
    7. Design a new toolbar button using the Button Editor.
    8. Create a custom pull-down menu containing accelerator keys, mnemonic shortcut keys, cascading menu items, help strings and line separators.
    9. Assign attributes to constructed blocks.
    10. Modify blocks and their attributes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Macros
    2. Text editors
    3. Line type files
    4. Hatch pattern files
    5. Template files
    6. External command and command alias definitions
    7. Slide shows and slide libraries
    8. Custom menus and tool bars
    9. Attributes and database basics
    10. Interchange and file formats
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 230 - Architectural Drafting


    Credits: 4
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 121  

     
    Description
    This is an advanced course in the application of engineering drawing principles to the field of architecture. The creation of working drawings is stressed. Included are site plans, floor plans, foundations, elevations, sections, details and preparation of presentation drawings. Emphasis is on development of skills, speed and adherence to recommended American Institute of Architects (AIA) standards.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain layer-naming conventions as related to architectural drawings.
    2. Prepare a fully annotated basement plan and floor plan for a typical small commercial structure.
    3. Add proper door and window symbols on a typical floor plan and basement plan based on manufacturer’s product specifications.
    4. Select doors and windows for an architectural project from manufacturer’s product catalogs or on-line sources.
    5. Prepare a door schedule and window schedule based on the manufacturer’s specifications.
    6. Discuss key site considerations, restrictions, zoning and codes for sites.
    7. Create a site plan drawing with contour lines using given specifications.
    8. Locate a building on sites with respect to set-back dimensions specified in a typical local zoning ordinance.
    9. Perform stair calculations to design stairways for structures.
    10. Draw typical exterior elevations.
    11. Size selected structural components using design data for residential construction.
    Listed Topics
    1. Architectural drafting conventions
    2. Foundation plans
    3. Basement plans
    4. Floor plans
    5. Structural calculations
    6. Structural sections
    7. Elevation drawings
    8. Site plans
    9. Door and window schedules
    10. Detail drawings
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 240 - Mechanical Drafting


    Credits: 4
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 121  

     
    Description
    This is an advanced course in the application of engineering drawing principles to mechanical engineering technology. Emphasized are the preparation of working drawings, including such items as assembly drawings, detail drawings, fasteners, gears and cams. Additional topics are presented based on specific drawing applications assigned.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the concept of a sectional view.
    2. Identify the seven types of sectional views.
    3. Draw full, half, broken-out, revolved, removed, offset, aligned, thin wall and assembly sections.
    4. Explain the proper techniques sectioning ribs, webs, spokes, fasteners, shafts and keyways on a drawing.
    5. Draw section-lining symbols for different materials.
    6. Prepare a fully annotated detailed drawing of a machine part using aligned and unidirectional dimensioning systems.
    7. Label the parts of a screw thread.
    8. Draw detailed, schematic and simplified threads in sections and elevation using American National Standard Limits (ANSL) standards.
    9. Draw standard fasteners, bolts, studs and screws using ANSL standards and manufacturer’s specifications.
    10. Construct a set of working drawings of a machine assembly, including assembly drawings, detail drawings, bill of materials, revisions block, part specifications and general notes.
    11. Calculate the tolerance dimensions between mating parts using the ANSL and the International Organization of Standardization (IOS) tolerances.
    Listed Topics
    1. CAD review
    2. Orthographic projection
    3. Section views
    4. Auxiliary views
    5. Annotations
    6. Threads and fasteners
    7. Tolerance
    8. Assembly drawings
    9. Working drawings
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 245 - Advanced Engineering Drawing


    Credits: 4
    5 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 230  or EDD 240  

     
    Description
    This is a project-oriented course, applying drawing concepts and techniques of previous course work to practical problems. students will develop a portfolio of drawings appropriate to their field of interest. Included is the application of computers to the engineering environment, with topics such as computer-aided drafting, design and manufacturing. The lerning outcomes for this course are consistent with the requirements outlined in the National Occupational Skill Standards (NOSS), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Prepare working drawings according to specifications.
    2. Produce a portfolio of a complete set of working drawings and design calculations.
    3. Apply the techniques of 2-D and 3-D CAD software to produce a fully annotated set of working drawings of assigned projects.
    4. Use the Internet to search product catalog information to incorporate into assigned projects.
    5. Design fully annotated working drawings, including plumbing, lighting and heating.
    6. Modify an existing machine assembly to include tolerance dimensions between mating parts.
    7. Replace machined components with stock parts found in manufacturers’ product catalogs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Assembly and detail drawings
    2. Tolerance calculations and applications
    3. Gear drawings
    4. Cam drawings
    5. Plumbing and piping drawings
    6. Plumbing design
    7. Heating drawings
    8. Heating design
    9. Ductwork sizing and design
    10. Lighting drawings
    11. Lighting design
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/01/2012


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EDD 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


    Course and Section Search



Engineering Science

  
  • EGR 100 - Engineering Seminar


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course prepares students for careers in engineering and technology. The course aquaints students with methods for solving practical engineering problems. Film and guest lecturers are utilized to describe the character of the work of graduate engineers in each of several engineering professions.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List potential pathways for engineering careers.
    2. Describe the skills required for careers in engineering.
    3. Solve problems using engineering methods.
    4. Construct engineering graphs by calculating basic functions and operations.

     Listed Topics

    1. Basic concepts of engineering
    2. Calculator basic functions, X-keys and triangles
    3. Engineering method, scientific method and heuristics
    4. Engineering method and engineering ethics
    5. Spectrum of engineering
    6. Career choices
    7. Problem solving and reporting
    8. Transferring troubleshooting skills
    9. Engineering graphics
    10. Linear graphs
    11. Non-linear graphs and graphical analysis
    Reference Materials
    Approved Instructor textbooks and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 03/20/20


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EGR 110 - Engineering Surveying


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Co-requisites: MAT 114  or previous knowledge of Trigonometry

    Description
    This course is a study of topographic surveying and mapping. Topics include construction surveys and layout, boundary surveys, determination of land areas, methods of collecting and recording data, field and office computations, control surveys, topographic mapping, care and use of surveying equipment, GPS systems, and surveying software. Emphasis will focus on topographic surveys using total stations with data collection. Field work includes use of transits, total stations, electronic distance meters, surveyors’ tapes, differential levels and data collectors, horizontal measurements, leveling, and angle and direction measurement.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the various instruments and related equipment used in surveying.
    2. Demonstrate the care and use of surveying equipment.
    3. Identify the skills related to the art and science of map making.
    4. Explain the methods to determine land area.
    5. Employ current techniques to make horizontal measurements and angle and direction measurements.
    6. Describe the fundamental principles and practices common to the industry for working as a land surveyor.
    7. Use software and methods for site surveying.
    Listed Topics
    1. Surveying and its Purpose - Source of Surveying Information
    2. Theory of Measurements and Errors
    3. Measurement of Distance
    4. Measurement of Direction - the Magnetic Compass, Angles, Bearings, and Azimuths
    5. Measurement of Angles - Use of the Transit
    6. Field Operations with Surveying Equipment and Instruments
    7. The Engineer’s Level and its Use
    8. Leveling – Theory and Methods
    9. Traverses and Land Surveys- Traversing and Traverse Computations
    10. Calculation of Closed Traverses and Land Area
    11. Stadia Surveying with Transit and Plane Table
    12. Aerial Surveying
    13. Lines and Grades
    14. Cross Sections – Volume
    15. Surveying Field Notes
    16. Topographic Surveys
    17. Control Surveys
    18. Boundary Surveys
    19. Construction Surveys
    20. Mapping
    21. Satellite and Inertial Surveying Systems
    22. Photogrammetry
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 11/16/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EGR 111 - Route Surveying


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EGR 110  

     
    Description
    This course covers the principal topics of highway surveying including profiles, horizontal and vertical curves, mass diagrams+ and street layout. Emphasis is on the study of the geometry and field stake-out techniques of circular curves, spiral curves, compound curves, reverse curves, equal-tangent vertical curves, and unequal-tangent vertical curves, horizontal and vertical alignment design, earthwork quantities and mass diagrams. The student will perform both field and lab work to gather information about a general route to select one or more tentative general routes of a roadway and mark the final location.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Solve various problems related to principles, design and application of vertical and horizontal curves.
    2. Calculate and interpret grades for roads or streets from design information.
    3. Calculate and interpret grades, cuts and fills and positions for placement of slope stakes.
    4. Describe route and layout methods.
    5. Read survey maps.
    6. Apply survey notes, calculations, and data to solve problems that relate to the completion of route related surveys.
    7. Create a route survey map from a set of survey notes, calculations, and data.
    Listed Topics
    1. Transportations Systems- Highways
    2. Reconnaissance and Planning
    3. Design
    4. Right-of-Way Acquisition
    5. Construction
    6. Stationing
    7. Offset Distance
    8. Profile Grades (Slope Percentage)
    9. Cross Sections
    10. Slope Staking
    11. Route Surveys by Ground and Aerial Methods
    12. Reverse and Parabolic Curves
    13. Horizontal and Vertical Curves
    14. Spiral Curves and Highway Safety
    15. Super-Elevations and Widenings
    16. Earthwork Calculations
    17. Application of Drainage Surveys
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook.
     
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 11/16/2009


    Course and Section Search



English as an Academic Language

  
  • EAL 051 - Listening and Speaking 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL Placement Test

     
    Description
    Multilingual learners in this course will be guided to develop skills pertaining to active listening and speaking in academic and social environments.  This is a beginner’s course that will provide students with listening tools, both face-to-face and online, providing them with interactive skills to practice fluency and accuracy in their speaking and listening.  Audio, video and community interviews will be utilized to improve skills in the most natural environments.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Name familiar words and feelings that are supported by actions and visuals.
    2. Identify main ideas and important information in brief conversations about familiar topics.
    3. Ask questions about familiar topics pertaining to self, family, social setting and work
    4. Express needs pertaining to a variety of situations, activities and feelings.
    5. Develop conversations on a variety of familiar topics by using basic sentence structures and phrases.
    Listed Topics
    1. Greetings
    2. Introduction
    3. Shopping
    4. Food and drinks
    5. Family
    6. School
    7. Daily Routine
    8. Parts of the body
    9. Plants and animals
    10. Feelings
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, Videos, Internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 052 - Listening and Speaking 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL 051   (Completed with minimum “C” grade) or EAL placement.

     
    Description
    Multilingual learners will develop listening and speaking skills in order to actively participate in various settings such as social, academic and professional.  Students will utilize face to face and online interactive listening and speaking programs.  Students will learn through activities that foster listening and speaking skills in different authentic environments such as lectures, newscasts and interviews.  Students will also develop various strategies for clarity and pronunciation in order to foster effective communication.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss information on a variety of familiar and non-familiar researched topics by using different time frames.
    2. Discuss familiar and unfamiliar topics by listening to, asking and answering questions about them.
    3. Explain reasons for making plans or choices.
    4. Summarize information gathered through research or conversations with others about familiar or unfamiliar topics by using complex and multiple sentences.
    5. Describe things, places and people by using multiple sentences and paragraphs.
    6. Differentiate between various cultures by talking about their similarities and differences.
    Listed Topics
    1. Travel
    2. Health
    3. The weather
    4. Places
    5. Eating out
    6. Money
    7. Plans
    8. Sports
    9. Cultures
    10. Communities
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks, Videos, Internet
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/02/2018


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 061 - EAL Pronunciation


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL Placement test
    Co-requisites: EAL 062  

    Description
    This course is for multilingual and emerging bilingual students of English who need to increase the clarity of their speech in English, for clear communication, while retaining accent.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Produce consonant and vowel sounds clearly.
    2. Distinguish word stress or prominence based on contextually situated variables.
    3. Demonstrate eye contact and effective body language while speaking.
    4. Develop individual awareness of volume and rate of speech.
    5. Build confidence in English speaking for different purposes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Gesture, body language and eye contact
    2. Stress, rhythm, intonation and phrasing
    3. Consonant and vowel sounds
    4. Positions of articulators, including, vocal cords, mouth, tongue, lips, throat and facial muscles
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and digital media
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 062 - EAL Communication in English


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL placement test
    Co-requisites: EAL 061  

    Description
    This course is for multilingual and emerging bilingual students of English who want to increase the efficiency of their communication skills. While focus is on oral communication, students will also obtain experience in listening and note taking skills.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate listening comprehension skills.
    2. Design speeches for argumentative and informative purposes.
    3. Recite a five minute dialogue project with a classmate.
    4. Determine the appropriate approach to discussion based on context.
    5. Develop an awareness of social cues, formalities and signals that are used in verbal and embodied communication in English.
    Listed Topics
    1. Reading and discussing the news
    2. Talking about oneself
    3. Taking a position on a topic
    4. Summarizing information
    5. Speaking in public
    6. Memorizing dialogue
    7. Listening and observing discussions in different contexts
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and digital media
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 070 - EAL Reading 1


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL reading placement test

     
    Description
    This course is for multilingual and emerging bilingual students of English with little experience reading and comprehending English texts. Special attention to vocabulary and basic comprehension skills supports students as they develop awareness of themselves as readers by employing metacognitive strategies. Additionally, students learn to identify and utilize organizational patterns and apply critical reading skills in making judgments about texts.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use strategies that are essential for comprehending and retaining material in a variety of texts.
    2. Distinguish between main idea and supporting details in readings.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of critical reading skills.
    4. Expand vocabulary skills through word analysis, dictionary usage and context clues.
    5. Summarize and report on readings in small and large group settings.
    Listed Topics
    1. Stages of the reading process
    2. Vocabulary development
    3. Patterns of organization in different genres of writing
    4. Basic critical thinking skills
    5. Engaging with written and audio texts that model different genres of writing
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and digital media
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 089 - EAL Academic English Structure


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL writing placement test.

     
    Description
    This course is for multilingual and emerging bilingual students of English with little experience writing in English for academic purposes, especially in the United States. This is the first of two courses that prepare the student for college-level writing.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the parts of a sentence.
    2. Distinguish between grammars in students’ best language and English.
    3. Demonstrate academic English rhetorical styles.
    4. Edit writings with grammatical errors.
    5. Generate ideas and express them in written form.
    6. Learn personal patterns for purposes of revision.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sentence elements
    2. Punctuation, spelling, grammar
    3. Sentence boundary errors
    4. Topic sentences and basic paragraph development
    5. Editing and revision
    6. Prewriting strategies
    7. Basic attribution and avoidance of plagiarism
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and digital software/media
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 100 - EAL Composition


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL 089  (minimum grade “C”) or successful placement.

     
    Description
    This course is for multilingual and emerging bilingual students of English with little experience writing in English for academic purposes, especially in the United States. Special attention is given to the skills necessary for developing rhetorical attunement to specific genres of writing, as well as planning, drafting, revising and proofreading.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Write paragraphs and short essays of different genres that employ unity, coherence, completeness and order.
    2. Shape writing by an awareness of audience, purpose and tone.
    3. Produce 4-5 multi-paragraph essays. Students should produce 10-15 pages of writing for the semester.
    4. Apply editing and revision skills to texts.
    5. Use and credit sources responsibly and appropriately.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sentence structure, grammar, topic sentences
    2. Paragraph unity and coherence
    3. Thesis development
    4. The writing process
    5. Formatting using word processing
    6. Conventions of citation specific to genre
    7. Quotation vs. paraphrase
    8. This course must offer students the opportunity to develop their digital literacies by writing/submitting writing in digital spaces such as blogs or course management systems.
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and digital software/media
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2016


    Course and Section Search


  
  • EAL 101 - EAL Reading 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: EAL 070  (minimum grade “C”) or successful placement.

     
    Description
    This course is for multilingual and emerging bilingual students of English. Skills taught in EAL 070  are reviewed and students are required to apply study and reading strategies learned to a variety of texts in different genres.

    Students must earn a “C” grade or better to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Practice rhetorical attunement to specific genres of writing.
    2. Identify the logical audience for different genres of writing.
    3. Generate opinions about the purpose of written texts.
    4. Respond, verbally and in writing, to a variety of texts.
    5. Develop English vocabulary.
    Listed Topics
    1. Rhetorical attunement practices: Identifying form, style, audience, purpose and tone.
    2. Vocabulary based on readings
    3. Discussing texts in class
    4. Presenting opinions/responses to texts in small and large groups
    5. Developing critical questions about texts
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks and digital software/media
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 10/25/2016


    Course and Section Search



English Writing & Literature

  
  • ENG 089 - Basic Writing Techniques


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: English placement test

     
    Description
    This is a course to help the student who has little writing experience to develop skills and fluency in writing and to detect, diagnose, and correct error patterns in focused writings. This is the first of two courses that prepare the student for college-level writing. Students must earn a “C” grade or better to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course as a prerequisite for a course in another discipline.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Write in response to readings.
    2. Generate ideas and express them in written forms.
    3. Detect, diagnose, and correct error patterns in focused writings.
    4. Edit to eliminate errors in the use of standard written English.
    5. Construct elementary summaries and paraphrases.
    6. Use a variety of sentence structures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Sentence elements
    2. Sentence types
    3. Punctuation, spelling, grammar
    4. Sentence boundary errors (fragment, run-on, comma splice, fused sentence)
    5. Sentence structure errors
    6. Topic sentences and basic paragraph development
    7. Thesis statements and essay development
    8. Prewriting strategies
    9. Editing
    10. Revising
    11. Basic attribution and avoidance of plagiarism
    12. Elementary summaries and paraphrases


    The student will produce numerous focused paragraphs and essays totaling a minimum of 10-14 pages of writing for the semester.


    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 12/13/2006


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