Feb 21, 2024  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses/ Master Syllabi


 

Business

  
  • BUS 240 - Small Business Management 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    A course for those who want to manage a small business. Emphasis is on management principles and their application to problems associated with the operation of a small business.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List and describe the basic concepts and components of a business plan.
    2. Compare and contrast the organizational concepts for the small business owner(s).
    3. Analyze financial challenges and recognize the solutions.
    4. Recognize and understand vendor relations.
    5. Develop recruitment and oversight of employees strategies and develop recruiting and evaluation criteria for employees.
    6. Develop a business/marketing plan.
    Listed Topics
    1. Forms of Ownership
    2. Franchise Operations
    3. Startups and Buyouts
    4. Financial Requirements
    5. Business Plan Preparation
    6. Human Resources Practices for a Small Business
    7. Purchasing Procedures
    8. Site Selection
    9. Accounting Requirements
    10. Marketing Techniques
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/13/2005


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  • BUS 245 - International Business


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    An introduction to international business that will cover topics of international finance, international marketing, international management and international human resource management. Several parts of the world will be highlighted to allow the student an opportunity to see the differences in conducting business from country to country. The course will also cover terminology specific to international business.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Compare and contrast the difference between business practices in the United States and internationally.
    2. Identify and recognize the financial, political, legal, and other risks in conducting international business.
    3. Identify and explain the cultural, social, religious and language barriers that must be acted upon in international business.
    Listed Topics
    1. Establishing the difference between domestic and international business.
    2. International finance including the currency exchange rate.
    3. A review of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund and their purpose in the world economy.
    4. Host country, home country, and third country relations.
    5. The variations in marketing the product covering both the legal aspects and the country’s customs.
    6. The major difference which exist among employees from different countries including the impacts of unions, country specific legal systems, technology, and the work ethics of various countries.
    7. The impact using more than one language has on the ability of firms to transact business.
    8. Overseas management efforts and the effects and issues including repatriation.
    9. World sourcing and collaboration of multinational firms with their subsidiaries, joint venture partners, and foreign investors.
    10. Political risk and methods to reduce them.
    11. The impact the triad has on business in the world.
    12. The European Union focusing on Germany, France, and the United Kingdom and their impact on world trade
    13. The Pacific Rim countries and the jmpact they have and will have in the future with special attention placed on Japan and South Korea.
    14. The impact South America and Africa will have on international business.
    15. A review of NAFTA and what this will mean to U.S. firms and workers.
    16. The infrastructure problems and tax change in the international market.
    17. The unique logistical challenges international business creates.
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook.
    Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/25/2005


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  • BUS 251 - Business Law 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is an introduction to the legal and ethical environment of business. Students learn basic legal concepts and how to apply the law to make business decisions.  In addition, a detailed review of the United States judicial system and sources of American law, including constitutional law, crimes, torts, contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) are covered.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define basic legal terminology.
    2. Identify legal issues affecting business entities.
    3. Describe the basic structure of the American legal system, including federal and state court systems.
    4. Discuss pertinent parts of the Constitution and Amendments related to business operations, including torts and crimes.
    5. Apply basic legal knowledge to common business situations through the analysis of court cases.
    6. Explain the various types of alternative dispute resolutions and their impact on business.
    7. Describe the formation of business contracts and their enforcement.
    Listed Topics
    1. Legal terminology
    2. Parts of a court case
    3. Reading court cases
    4. Briefing court cases
    5. Federal court system
    6. State court system
    7. Bringing a case to trial
    8. The Constitution and Amendments 
    9. Torts
    10. Crimes 
    11. Alternative dispute resolutions
    12. Contracts
    13. UCC
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook. Supplementary materials such as study guides, videos, handouts, library resources.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • BUS 252 - Business Law 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: BUS 251  

     
    Description
    This course is an examination of the laws of partnerships, corporations, property and title. Specialized business law relationships including landlord-tenant, insurer-insured, sales and warranty contracts, bailments and the law of negotiable instruments are studied.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Generate transactions using digital and traditional processes.
    2. Rank security interests in personal property according to correct legal tenets.
    3. Recommend appropriate remedies and suretyship for creditors.
    4. Describe the characteristics of Chapters 7, 11 and 13 bankruptcy.
    5. List the legal characteristics required for the formation, operation and dissolution of sole proprietorships, partnerships and limited liability companies.
    6. Apply the legal steps required to establish the various corporate forms of organization.
    7. Distinguish between the powers of corporate directors, officers and shareholders.
    8. List the legal processes required for corporate acquisitions, takeovers and terminations.
    9. Define how federal antitrust and administrative laws require corporate governance to protect investors from insider trading.
    10. Cite how federal consumer law is applied in various circumstances.
    11. Recognize examples of federal environmental laws.
    12. Apply employment immigration and labor law in the area of employment discrimination and other employment issues using case studies.
    13. Describe the liability of accountants and other professionals regarding compliance with business law.
    14. Distinguish between federal laws governing personal property, agency, bailmen’s, real property and landlord-tenant relationships.
    15. Identify situations in which insurance, wills and trusts would be the preferred legal instrument.
    16. Describe how international treaty law affects domestic and international corporations in a global economy.
    Listed Topics
    1. Checks and the banking system
    2. Security interest, personal property, creditors’ remedies and suretyship
    3. Bankruptcy law
    4. Agency-principal, agent and third parties
    5. Sole proprietorships, partnerships and limited liability companies
    6. Corporate formation, financing, acquisitions, takeovers and termination
    7. Characteristics of corporate directors, officers and shareholders
    8. Federal laws governing antitrust, administrative and consumer law
    9. Environmental law
    10. Federal employment laws
    11. Liability of accountants and other professionals
    12. Global economy law
    Reference Materials
    Textbook, case studies, journal articles, study guides, handouts and library resources.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/13/2010


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  • BUS 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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  • BUS 406 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 6
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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Carpentry

  
  • CAR 101 - Carpentry 1


    Credits: 6
    4 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course prepares students with the professional skills and competencies they will need to work as commercial carpenters. This course includes laboratory sessions and provides an opportunity for hands-on training. Topics include safety, structural framing, interior systems and concrete framing.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe safety standards related to the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), Infection Control Risk Assessment (ICRA), ergonomics, confined space, fall protection, aerial lifts and fire protection.
    2. Operate basic hand and power-actuated tools.
    3. Explain sexual harassment, professional behavior, drug and alcohol abuse.
    4. Utilize framing techniques for decks, walls and ceiling joists with a variety of materials.
    5. Prepare a variety of concrete forms with contemporary materials and methods.
    6. Apply interior systems techniques using light gauge metal framing.
    7. Identify Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) concepts.
    Listed Topics
    1. OSHA, ICRA, ergonomics, confined space, fall protection, fire protection
    2. Hand and power tools
    3. Sexual harassment, professional behavior, drug and alcohol abuse
    4. Decks, walls and ceiling framing techniques
    5. Concrete forms
    6. Interior systems
    7. LEED concepts
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 102 - Carpentry 2


    Credits: 6
    4 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 101  

     
    Description
    This course prepares students with the professional skills and competencies they will need to work as commercial carpenters. This course includes laboratory sessions and provides an opportunity for hands-on training. Topics include roof framing, interior ceiling systems, concrete systems and scaffolding.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Lay out an assortment of roof designs.
    2. Apply construction techniques for suspended drywall and acoustic ceiling design.
    3. Assemble construction scaffolding with the proper leveling and rigging methods.
    4. Utilize framing methods for concrete stairs.
    5. Explain types of concrete, anchor bolts and reinforcement bar.
    6. Lay out bulkheads, spanning an opening.
    7. Identify Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) concepts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Roof designs
    2. Suspended drywall and acoustical ceilings
    3. Scaffolding, leveling and rigging
    4. Concrete stair framing
    5. Concrete and materials
    6. Bulkhead design
    7. LEED concepts
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 105 - Carpentry Drafting and Blueprint Reading 1


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course deals with the interpretation of technical drawings, isometric drawings and building plans. Students interpret three-dimensional, sectional, schematic and exploded views. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts will be discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe functions of various kinds of drawings contained in a set of blueprints.
    2. Identify various types of lines and read dimensions.
    3. Explain the meaning of symbols and abbreviations used on a set of blueprints.
    4. Interpret plot, foundation, floor and framing plans.
    5. Discuss how specifications are utilized.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of drawings
    2. Lines and dimensions
    3. Symbols and abbreviations
    4. Plot, foundation, floor and framing plans
    5. Specifications
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 106 - Carpentry Drafting and Blueprint Reading 2


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 105  

     
    Description
    This course deals with the interpretation of technical drawings, isometric drawings and building plans. Students interpret three-dimensional, sectional, schematic and exploded views. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Sketch various roof designs.
    2. Plan multiple styles of ceilings.
    3. Design framing for concrete stairs.
    4. Draft bulkheads, spanning openings.
    Listed Topics
    1. Roof designs
    2. Ceilings
    3. Concrete framing
    4. Bulkheads
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 115 - Mathematics for Carpenters 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course provides a foundation of mathematics applied to the carpentry trade. Students will practice computational skills and apply analytical solutions to carpentry projects using measurements, geometry, speed squares, sliding t-bevels, combination squares and framing squares.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Calculate linear feet, board feet, square feet and cubic feet.
    2. Calculate measurement to one eighth of an inch and one centimeter.
    3. Estimate quantities of material and prepare order sheets.
    4. Lay out building lines by using the Pythagorean Theorem.
    5. Build batter boards and accurately establish building lines with string.
    Listed Topics
    1. Space and measurement calculations
    2. Measuring devices
    3. Estimating materials
    4. Building layout
    5. Batter boards
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 116 - Mathematics for Carpenters 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 115  

     
    Description
    This course provides a foundation of mathematics applied to the carpentry trade. Students will practice computational skills and apply analytical solutions to carpentry projects using measurements, geometry and algebra.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Calculate how many squares of shingles will be needed for various types of roofs.
    2. Estimate underlayment needed to cover various types of roofs.
    3. Determine how many yards of concrete needed for projects.
    4. Determine the length of stairwells.
    Listed Topics
    1. Roofing calculations
    2. Roof underlayment materials
    3. Concrete calculations
    4. Stairwell layouts
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 06/04/2014


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  • CAR 201 - Carpentry 3


    Credits: 6
    4 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 102  

     
    Description
    This course prepares students with the professional skills and competencies they will need to work as commercial carpenters. This course includes laboratory sessions and provides an opportunity for hands-on training. Topics include trusses, intersecting roofs, exterior finishes, insulation and cabinet installation.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe intersecting roof designs and roof trusses.
    2. Identify roofing materials and methods.
    3. List exterior finish materials and procedures.
    4. Explain insulation practices.
    5. Operate a rough terrain fork lift.
    6. Install cabinets according to best practices.
    7. Apply firestop design techniques.
    8. Identify Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) concepts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Roof designs and trusses
    2. Roofing materials and methods
    3. Exterior finishes
    4. Insulation
    5. Forklift operation
    6. Cabinet insulation
    7. Firestop design
    8. LEED concepts
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 202 - Carpentry 4


    Credits: 6
    4 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 201  

     
    Description
    This course prepares students with the professional skills and competencies they will need to work as commercial carpenters. This course includes laboratory sessions and provides an opportunity for hands-on training. Topics include door installation, advanced tools, rigging and welding.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Install various types of wood and metal doors.
    2. Operate various specialized stationary power and pneumatic tools.
    3. Earn an industry rigging certification.
    4. Earn Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 30-hour construction certification.
    5. Demonstrate welding and cutting techniques on metal studding.
    6. Install various types of windows.
    7. Identify Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) concepts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Wood and metal door installation
    2. Stationary power and pneumatic tools
    3. Rigging certification
    4. OSHA 30-hour construction certification
    5. Welding and cutting
    6. Window installation
    7. LEED concepts
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 205 - Carpentry Drafting/Blueprint Reading 3


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 106  

     
    Description
    This course deals with the interpretation of technical drawings, isometric drawings and building plans. Students interpret three-dimensional, sectional, schematic and exploded views. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Lay out various staircase designs as specified on blueprints.
    2. Sketch intersecting roof designs.
    3. Plan cabinet installation procedures.
    4. Design various roof trusses.
    Listed Topics
    1. Staircase designs
    2. Intersecting roof design
    3. Cabinet installation
    4. Roof trusses
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


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  • CAR 206 - Carpentry Drafting and Blueprint Reading 4


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 205  

     
    Description
    This course deals with the interpretation of technical drawings, isometric drawings and building plans. Students interpret three-dimensional, sectional, schematic and exploded views. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concepts will be discussed.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Outline door and hardware specifications using blueprints.
    2. Draft a window material list from blueprints.
    3. Interpret LEED specifications using blueprints.
    4. Estimate labor hours for specific jobs using blueprints.
    Listed Topics
    1. Door and hardware materials
    2. Window materials
    3. LEED concepts
    4. Estimating labor
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CAR 215 - Mathematics for Carpenters 3


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 116  

     
    Description
    This course provides a foundation of mathematics applied to the carpentry trade. Students will practice computational skills and apply analytical solutions to carpentry projects using measurements, geometry and algebra.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Estimate required roof material from blue prints.
    2. Calculate the unit rise and run of a stairway given the total rise.
    3. Operate a construction master calculator.
    4. Calculate compound angles for trim molding.
    Listed Topics
    1. Estimating
    2. Stairs
    3. Construction master calculator
    4. Compound angles
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CAR 216 - Mathematics for Carpenters 4


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CAR 215  

     
    Description
    This course provides a foundation of mathematics applied to the carpentry trade. Students will practice computational skills and apply analytical solutions to carpentry projects using measurements, geometry and algebra.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Estimate door hardware from blueprints.
    2. Analyze hexagons, pentagons and octagons.
    3. Calculate volume in cubes and cylinders.
    4. Compute the area of a circle.
    Listed Topics
    1. Estimating
    2. Hexagons, pentagons and octagons
    3. Volume calculations
    4. Circles
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/06/2014


    Course and Section Search



Central Service Technician

  
  • CST 103 - Inventory Management for Central Service


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Central Service Technician Program
    Co-requisites: SUR 110  or Employed Central Service Technician

    Description
    This course is a central service certification preparatory course. The student is introduced to the expanding role of the Central Service Technician as it relates to all areas of the institution. This course includes an introduction to the anatomical systems and medical terminology as they relate to hospital equipment. Theory includes basic anatomy and the corresponding equipment, inventory management and distribution, risk management, reusable versus disposable products, inventory control, purchasing, off-site warehousing and regulatory agencies. There is a review of all aspects of central service including sterilization, disinfection, packaging, instrumentation, human relationship skills and teamwork. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List two government agencies that regulate the activities of the Central Service Department.
    2. Differentiate between quality control and quality assurance.
    3. Define continuous quality improvement (CQI).
    4. Identify the six types of distribution systems utilized in Central Service Departments and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    5. List four principal types of inventory control systems.
    6. Explain the purpose of tracking patient equipment.
    7. List one advantage and disadvantage of the case cart system as utilized in the operating room.
    8. Define the role of the central service technician in preventive maintenance of patient care equipment.
    9. Identify the key steps in reporting accidents and personal or patient injuries.
    10. Identify time and temperature ratios for all forms of sterilization.

     Listed Topics

    1. Anatomy, physiology and related medical terminology
    2. Equipment management
    3. Purchasing and distribution
    4. Communication
    5. Current trends in central service
    6. Certification review
    Reference Materials
    Selected textbooks, references and electronic media will be used.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • CST 112C - Central Service Clinical


    Credits: 6
    330 Clinical Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Central Service Technician Program
    Co-requisites: SUR 110  

    Description
    This course assigns students to various clinical sites under the supervision of a surgical technology instructor. Students gain exposure to the various aspects of central service to obtain direct experience in instrumentation and processing, decontamination, sterilization, wrapping, equipment maintenance, distribution and case cart systems. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the appropriate biological indicators used for various sterilizers.
    2. Examine the results of biological testing for various sterilizers.
    3. Demonstrate proper handling of contaminated equipment and instruments, according to standard precautions and  hospital policy.
    4. Demonstrate inventory management and distribution of items to various hospital departments.
    5. Demonstrate preparation of case carts for the operating room.
    6. Prepare items for sterilization.
    7. Differentiate between decontamination and disinfection.
    8. Explain the factors of an electronic operating room schedule.
    9. Demonstrate professional behavior in the clinical setting.

     Listed Topics

    1. Sterile processing
    2. Distribution systems
    3. Decontamination and disinfection
    4. Instrumentation
    5. Operation of various sterilizers
    Reference Materials
    Selected textbooks and references will be used.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 04/10/2020


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  • CST 121 - Central Service Technician Certif Exam Prep


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Current employee in a central service or surgical service department.

     
    Description
    This course prepares the current Central Service Technician and surgical service employee for the certification examination sponsored by the International Association of Healthcare Central Service Material Management (IAHCSMM). The students expand on their current knowledge of the profession as they are updated to the expanding roles and underlying principles relating to their role as a Central Service Technician. There is a focus on the methods of test taking through discussion and practice tests. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Combine prefixes, word roots and suffixes to create medical terms related to surgery.
    2. Identify abbreviations for surgical procedures and the specialty to which they belong.
    3. Discuss the relationship of bacteria to the decontamination and sterilization process.
    4. Identify the disinfection or sterilization processes required for surgical instruments and patient care equipment as defined by the Spaulding classification system.
    5. Differentiate among government, state and local agencies as they relate to the Central Service Department.
    6. Differentiate between quality control and quality assurance.
    7. Give a specific example of continuous quality improvement (CQI) that applies to the employee’s department.
    8. Identify three quality control indicators that apply to the Central Service Department.
    9. Identify the six types of distribution systems utilized in the Central Service Department.
    10. Explain common barriers to effective communication.

     Listed Topics

    1. Anatomy, Physiology and Related Medical Terminology
    2. Equipment Management
    3. Purchasing and Distribution
    4. Communication
    5. Current trends in Central Service
    6. Certification Review
    Reference Materials
    Selected textbooks, electronic media and references will be used.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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Chemistry

  
  • CHM 109 - Introduction to Chemistry


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 090  

     
    Description
    This is an introductory course incorporating the concepts of chemical structure, bonding and stoichiometric relationships. Students with weak backgrounds in Chemistry are advised to take this course before enrolling in General Chemistry 1. This course has a laboratory component.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Solve dimensional analysis problems and make conversions related to the metric system, temperature and density.
    2. Classify matter based on its physical properties.
    3. Describe atomic structure, atomic mass and isotopes.
    4. Use the periodic table as a tool.
    5. Describe how atoms form ionic and covalent bonds.
    6. Write the names and formulas to elements and compounds.
    7. Apply mole relationships to elements and compounds.
    8. Write, balance and classify chemical equations.
    9. Solve stoichiometry problems.
    10. Calculate the concentration of solutions.
    11. Calculate pH of acidic and basic solutions.
    12. Exhibit proper laboratory safety procedures.
    13. Demonstrate basic measurement techniques.
    14. Demonstrate basic laboratory techniques.
    15. Perform chemical reactions.
    16. Utilize appropriate observation techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Significant digits, exponential and scientific notation
    2. Metric measurements, factor labeling, and density
    3. Matter and its properties
    4. Atomic structure
    5. Periodic classification of the elements
    6. Ionic and covalent bonding
    7. Chemical nomenclature
    8. The mole concept
    9. Writing, balancing, and classification of chemical equations
    10. Stoichiometric calculations
    11. Acids, bases and solutions
    12. Laboratory techniques
    Reference Materials
    Standard introductory chemistry textbook and lab manual.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/15/2007


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  • CHM 110 - Introductory Chemistry


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 090  

     
    Description
    This is an introductory course incorporating the concepts of chemical structure, bonding and stoichiometric relationships. Students with weak backgrounds in chemistry are advised to take this course before enrolling in General Chemistry 1. Students who wish may take CHM 111  at the same time.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Solve dimensional analysis problems and make conversions related to the metric system, temperature and density.
    2. Classify matter based on its physical properties.
    3. Describe atomic structure, atomic mass and isotopes.
    4. Use the periodic table as a tool.
    5. Describe how atoms form ionic and covalent bonds.
    6. Write the names and formulas to elements and compounds.
    7. Apply mole relationships to elements and compounds.
    8. Write, balance and classify chemical equations.
    9. Solve stoichiometry problems.
    10. Calculate the concentration of solutions.
    11. Calculate pH of acidic and basic solutions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Significant digits, exponential and scientific notation
    2. Metric measurements, factor labeling, and density
    3. Matter and its properties
    4. Atomic structure
    5. Periodic classification of the elements
    6. Ionic and covalent bonding
    7. Chemical nomenclature
    8. The mole concept
    9. Writing, balancing, and classification of chemical equations
    10. Stoichiometric calculations
    11. Acids, bases and solutions
    Reference Materials
    Standard introductory chemistry textbook.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 03/15/2007


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  • CHM 111 - Introductory Chemistry Lab


    Credits: 1
    2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: MAT 090  and (CHM 110  with a grade C or better).
    Co-requisites: CHM 110  

    Description
    This is a laboratory course for non-chemistry majors emphasizing basic chemical laboratory techniques. The experiments performed provide an understanding or show a practical application of the fundamental principles underlying chemical structure, bonding and stoichiometric relationships.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Solve dimensional analysis problems and make conversions related to the metric system, temperature and density.
    2. Measure the pH of acidic and basic solutions.
    3. Exhibit proper laboratory safety procedures.
    4. Demonstrate basic measurement techniques.
    5. Demonstrate basic laboratory techniques.
    6. Perform chemical reactions.
    7. Utilize appropriate observation techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Significant digits
    2. Metric measurements, factor labeling and density
    3. Writing, balancing and classification of chemical equations
    4. Acids, bases and solutions
    5. Laboratory techniques
    Reference Materials
    Standard introductory chemistry lab manual.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 04/16/2013


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  • CHM 120 - Bio-Organic Chemistry


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CHM 109  or CHM 110 /CHM 111  or equivalent high school chemistry

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the elements of general, organic and biological chemistry which are essential to the Allied Health professions. Principles of carbon chemistry are developed and related to more important aspects of biological chemistry.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Write a molecular, structural and empirical formula for an organic compound.
    2. Describe organic compounds using IUPAC naming system.
    3. Identify examples of compounds of major common functional groups.
    4. List the physical and chemical properties of the compounds containing the major functional groups.
    5. Describe the structures for lipids, carbohydrates and proteins.
    6. Explain the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.
    7. Build three dimensional models of organic compounds.
    8. Identify the functional group present in an organic compound by laboratory testing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Organic chemistry
    2. Hydrocarbons
    3. Alcohol, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters
    4. Acetals, ketals, hemiacetals, hemiketals
    5. Organic synthesis
    6. Biochemistry
    7. Carbohydrates
    8. Lipids
    9. Proteins
    10. Enzymes
    11. Nucleic acids
    12. Biochemical energy and ATP
    13. Carbohydrate metabolism
    14. Lipid metabolism
    15. Protein metabolism
    Reference Materials
    Standard tests, multimedia material and the Internet.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 03/01/2010


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  • CHM 151 - General Chemistry 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CHM 109  or CHM 110  and CHM 111  or ”B” or better in high school chemistry within the past five years and MAT 108  or MAT 111  or higher.

     
    Description
    This is a chemistry course appropriate for science and engineering majors. The topics include: measurements, classification and properties of matter, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, periodicity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, chemical reactions and the structure. Laboratory experiments deal with the quantitative and qualitative determination of physical and chemical properties of chemical substances.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List the common SI units of measurement, the values of selected prefixes and the use of dimensional analysis to interconvert units of measurement.
    2. Classify matter on the basis of physical and chemical properties and physical and chemical changes.
    3. Describe the structure of the atom in terms of subatomic particles; write the isotopic symbol for any isotope of a given element and an atom’s electronic configuration.
    4. Use the periodic table to categorize elements, infer the physical and chemical properties of elements, and to determine electron configurations.
    5. Write proper formulas and name common ions, ionic, covalent and organic compounds including acid base nomenclature where appropriate.
    6. Apply the mole concept to the determination of mass, % composition, empirical and molecular formulas.
    7. Apply the mole concept to stoichiometry calculations such as yield and per cent yield.
    8. Discuss the role of heat in chemical reactions, perform calorimetric calculations or use enthalpy tables to determine the heat of reaction.
    9. Discuss the properties of electromagnetic radiation with respect to wavelength, frequency, energy and spectral region and be able to calculate the energy, frequency or wavelength from appropriate data.
    10. Compare and contrast the Bohr and quantum theories of atomic structure and how they account for location of electrons in atoms and spectral lines.
    11. Write Lewis structures for ions, ionic and covalent compounds and use these structures and VSPER theory to predict molecular and ionic geometries.
    12. Compare and contrast valence bond, molecular orbital and metallic bonding theories and how each accounts for molecular structures and properties.
    13. Use kinetic molecular theory to account for the properties of gases and the gas laws.
    14. Use gas laws to calculate the pressure, volume, temperature, number of moles or molecular.
    Listed Topics
    1. Measurements
    2. Classification of matter
    3. Chemical nomenclature
    4. Type of chemical reactions
    5. Calculations involving the mole concept
    6. Classification and balancing of equations
    7. Reaction stoichiometry and its applications
    8. Atomic structure
    9. Periodicity and electron configurations
    10. Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding
    11. Molecular geometry
    12. Valence bond and molecular orbital bonding theories
    13. Properties of gases and the gas laws
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CHM 152 - General Chemistry 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 3 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CHM 151  with a C grade or better.

     
    Description
    In this course students investigate intermolecular forces, properties of solids and liquids, solution theory, acid-base theory, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, chemical thermodynamics and electrochemistry. This course has a laboratory component. The experiments support the lecture principles through data collection and analysis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply principles of intermolecular attraction to predict physical properties of substances.
    2. Identify central themes in the chemical theories of solids, liquids, solutions and gases.
    3. Perform calculations related to the chemical concepts. 
    4. Relate chemical concepts to real-world contexts. 
    5. Infer information from periodic trends.
    6. Apply experimental techniques and safety rules used in the execution of laboratory experiments.

     Listed Topics

    1. Solids, liquids and intermolecular forces
    2. Solutions and colligative properties
    3. Kinetics: rate laws, collision and transition state theories
    4. Chemical equilibrium: equilibrium constant calculations and Le Chatelier’s principle 
    5. Acid-base theory: pH, buffer and ionization constant calculations
    6. Thermodynamics: entropy, free energy, spontaneity and the laws of thermodynamics
    7. Electrochemistry: voltaic and galvanic cells and calculation of cell potential


     Reference Materials
    Textbooks and materials as deemed appropriate by instructor.


    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 5/17/2020


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  • CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry 1


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CHM 152  or permission of instructor

     
    Description
    The course covers the chemistry of the organic compounds of carbon. This includes the bonding, structure (including stereochemistry), nomenclature, physical properties, reactions and reaction mechanisms. The alkane, alkene, alkyne, alkyl, halide, alcohol, ethers and epoxides functional groups are studied in detail. Laboratory is an introduction to basic organic lab operations, such as separation, extraction and determination of physical properties.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Given a structure, give the name; or given the name, draw the structure for a given compound.
    2. Classify organic compounds by functional group and structure. (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers and epoxides).
    3. Illustrate and/or discuss the relationship of physical properties of a compound to its structure.
    4. Illustrate and apply the concept of resonance structures and molecular conformations to determine the reactivity and stability of organic compounds.
    5. List and recognize the common reaction intermediates involve in the mechanisms of organic chemistry (nucleophilic elimination).
    6. Write, complete and use the common reactions for the aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers and epoxides.
    7. Determine the physical properties of organic compounds (melting point, boiling point, refractive index, density) and use these properties to identify a compound.
    8. Separate a mixture of organic compounds (extraction, distillation, fractional distillation, steam distillation).
    9. Synthesize organic compounds by applying your knowledge of common organic reactions (on paper or in laboratory).
    Listed Topics
    1. Structure and bonding
    2. Lewis and resonance structures
    3. Molecular shapes
    4. Identity of functional groups
    5. Stereochemistry
    6. R & S nomenclature
    7. Thermodynamics and organic reactions
    8. Mechanisms and reactive intermediates
    9. Nomenclature of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers and epoxides
    10. Nucleolphlilic reaction mechanisms
    11. Electrophlic reaction mechanisms
    12. Organic oxidation-reduction reactions
    Reference Materials
    Standard chemistry textbook.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry 2


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 4 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CHM 201  or permission of instructor

     
    Description
    This course covers the chemistry of the organic compounds of carbon. This includes the bonding, structure (including stereochemistry), nomenclature, physical properties, reactions and reaction mechanisms. The dienes, aromatics, acids, acid derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carbohydrate, lipids and amino acids functional groups are studied in detail. Laboratory is an introduction to identification of organic compounds by spectroscopic and NMR data, and synthesis of organic compounds.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Given a structure, give the name; or given the name, draw the structure for a given compound.
    2. Classify organic compounds by functional group, and structure. (dienes, aromatic, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids ).
    3. Illustrate and/or discuss the relationship of physical properties of a compound to its structure.
    4. List and recognize the common reaction intermediates involve in the mechanisms of organic chemistry (Electrophlic addition, substitution reaction of carbonyl compounds, condensation reactions etc.).
    5. Write, complete and use the common reactions for the aliphatic hydrocarbons, (dienes, aromatic, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids ).
    6. Use the physical properties, UV, IR, Mass spectral data, NMR data to determine the identity or structure of a compound.
    7. Synthesize organic compounds by applying your knowledge of common organic reactions (on paper or in laboratory).
    Listed Topics
    1. Mass spectrometry
    2. UV and IR spectrometry
    3. NMR spectrometry
    4. Dienes and conjugation
    5. Benzene and other aromatic compounds
    6. Electrophlic aromatic substitution mechanisms
    7. Organometallic reagents
    8. Oxidation Reduction reactions of carbonyl compounds
    9. Carboxylic acids and acid derivatives
    10. Substitution reactions of carbonyl compounds
    11. Condensation reactions of carbonyl compounds
    12. Amines
    13. Carbohydrates, Lipids and amino acids.
    14. Nomenclature of (dienes, aromatic, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids )
    Reference Materials
    Standard textbook
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 07/13/2006


    Course and Section Search



Civil Engineering Technology

  
  • CET 140 - Site Plan Drafting


    Credits: 3
    4 Skills Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: EDD 120  

     
    Description
    This course provides training and background to produce civil engineering working drawings using computer-aided drafting techniques. Emphasis will be on site plan development and the preparation of drawings and specifications for land development. The course focus includes: maps, surveys, site plans, utilities, subdivision planning, roads, topography and grading, storm water drainage, sanitary sewer considerations and the basic use of GPS systems.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the software’s user interface process.
    2. Locate points into groups from survey figures.
    3. Interpret parcel information from reports.
    4. Create a survey of a plot of land.
    5. Produce a surface by using established survey points.
    6. Compose an alignment of a roadway.
    7. Diagram a profile of a cross-section.
    8. Generate a corridor using assemblies and intersections.
    9. Calculate grading solutions of a revised site.
    10. Compare different types of gravity fed and pressure pipe networks.
    11. Perform quanitity takeoff and volume calculations.
    12. Assemble plan production tools to create plan and profile sheets.
    Listed Topics
    1. The Autodesk Civil 3D interface
    2. Project management
    3. Parcels
    4. Survey
    5. Surfaces
    6. Alignments
    7. Profiles
    8. Corridors
    9. Grading
    10. Pipe networks
    11. Quantity take off/sections
    12. Plan production
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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  • CET 201 - Materials of Construction


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of the materials used in construction. Materials include wood, masonry and concrete, steel and non-ferrous metals, bitumens, roofing and siding, sealants and finishes. Green and sustainable materials are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. List material requirements for a simple building.
    2. Define bituminous material.
    3. Calculate the number of tons of asphalt required to pave a road.
    4. Define heat of hydration.
    5. List the four basic chemical components of concrete.
    6. Compare hot and cold weather concrete placement.
    7. Describe property improvement from heat treatment of steel.
    8. List the methods used to grade lumber.
    9. Compare and contrast green and sustainable construction materials and costs in determining project needs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Materials
    2. Aggregates
    3. Asphalt
    4. Concrete
    5. Construction procedures
    6. Ferrous and non-ferrous metals
    7. Construction procedures
    8. Softwood and hardwood lumber
    9. Laminated lumber
    10. Construction procedures
    11. Sealant and finishes
    12. Green and sustainable construction materials
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CET 202 - Soils in Construction


    Credits: 4
    3 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Description
    This course is a study of the composition, classification and processing of soils and their influence on the construction process. Laboratory tests will be performed on soils and aggregates to determine their physical and mechanical properties. Topics include soil properties, soil testing, detailed computations, evaluation of testing methods and results, excavation and types of foundations.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe general index properties and basic soil structure.
    2. Explain moisture and its relationship to capillary flow and permeability.
    3. Calculate settlement of above ground structures using compressibility principles.
    4. Explain the difference between cohesive and cohesionless soils.
    5. Calculate the shear strength of choesive and cohesionless soils.
    6. Employ stress analysis of various soil types.
    7. Analyze the stability of slopes using rotational and translational methods of analysis.
    8. Design spread foundations without soil failure.
    9. Relate theory and reasons for soil compaction.
    10. Identify categories of soils and major soil types.
    11. Identify types of rocks.
    12. Explain the effects of soil on design and construction.
    13. Describe soil composition (weight, volume, and mass relationships).
    14. Describe soil structure and soil classification tests.
    15. Describe test method used to establish soil density and field density.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to soils
    2. Soil types and soil structure
    3. Classification of soils
    4. Physical and engineering properties of soils
    5. Soil composition: terminology and definitions
    6. Particle sizes
    7. Particle arrangement
    8. Aggregates
    9. Soil particle size analysis
    10. Bulk density, particle density and porosity of soil
    11. Compaction
    12. Soil survey reports
    13. Soil surveys and land-use planning
    14. Site investigations: purpose and methods
    15. Foundations: introductory concepts
    16. Foundations: design considerations and methods
    17. Site improvement: earth moving, compaction and stabilization
    18. Pavement structure and base
    19. Asphalt pavements and materials
    20. Soils and the environment
    21. Soil and environment quality
    22. Soil quality and pollution
    Reference Materials
    Instructor approved textbook.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CET 215 - Site Plan Development


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course focuses on site planning and design that takes into account all physical problems or assets of the land. Emphasis is placed on the task of moving people, buildings and vehicles into a functional order producing logical and aesthetic solutions. Analysis of the profitability of land development and green and sustainable building sites are discussed.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Analyze the logical steps in determining a specific plan for site development.
    2. Develop order and function to the various elements in the design to follow a logical pattern.
    3. Describe methods of storm water management and erosion control.
    4. Compare and contrast methods for green and sustainable building site design.
    5. Develop a plan for streets, roads and parking areas for potential new site plans.
    6. Analyze methods for pedestrian and bicycle circulation for potential new site plans.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical reference
    2. Environmental considerations
    3. Mapping and inventory
    4. Geology and soils
    5. Vegetation
    6. Hydrology
    7. Shaping of the site
    8. Grading
    9. Retaining walls
    10. Topography
    11. Storm water management and erosion control
    12. Streets and roads
    13. Parking
    14. Pedestrian and bicycle circulation
    15. Green and sustainable building sites
    Reference Materials
    Instructor-approved textbook and materials.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/10/2020


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College Seminar

  
  • SEM 105 - College Seminar


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Description
    In this course, students explore academic strategies, culture, resources and expectations. Topics include career planning and graduation requirements. Students discover and use current college tools and services as the foundation for creating individualized academic, career and resource plans.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply independent learning strategies required for success in academic courses at the college level.
    2. Describe the major characteristics of college culture, expectations, and procedures.
    3. Utilize effective communication skills in order to interact respectfully and productively in a diverse learning environment.
    4. Identify interests and resources related to career options through the development of a career plan.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of academic terminology and timing through the development of an academic plan.  
    6. Apply problem-solving strategies to manage issues that impact school performance through the creation of a resource plan.
    7. Demonstrate information literacy using appropriate technological tools and resources necessary for academic success.
    Listed Topics
    1. College classroom expectations
    2. Academic terminology
    3. Policies and procedures as outlined in the CCAC Student Handbook
    4. Communication in a diverse setting
    5. Awareness of cultural differences
    6. Alignment of career interests to academic programs
    7. Career exploration and online tools
    8. Transfer programs and articulation agreements
    9. Program requirements
    10. Financial literacy
    11. Time management
    12. Study strategies
    13. Active learning techniques
    14. Goal-setting
    15. Student development resources (career services, advising & registration, financial aid, transfer & personal counseling, supportive services, campus cupboard, etc.) 
    16. Document sharing
    17. Blackboard and MyCCAC portal
    18. Academic email use and etiquette

    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 09/26/2019


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Computer-Assisted Tomography

  
  • CAT 201 - Comp Tomogrph Inst/Equip Procedures


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into CAT program
    Co-requisites: CAT 202  and CAT 203  

    Description
    This is a course in medical computed tomography(CT) for certified technologists. Included are a history of medical imaging in radiology sciences, advanced principles of image reconstruction for human anatomy utilizing radiographic computed tomography techniques, essential elements of medical computer systems, patient positioning for scanning protocols and data acquisition systematic procedures. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify early development of computed tomography, fundamentals and historical perspectives in medical imaging.
    2. Survey the principles of image reconstruction and processing concerning the CT field.
    3. Manipulate formulas to calculate principles of three-dimensional CT scanning.
    4. Examine software category systems utilized for computerized tomography applications.
    5. Identify the functions of the input, output, display and storage hardware necessary for scanning procedures and examinations.
    6. Explain analog, digital images and sampling protocol.
    7. Classify biological factors of contrast agents, chemical interactions, osmolality and viscosity and anaphylactic reactions that occur in CT scanning departments.
    8. Identify the technical matrix necessary for operation of the CT scanner.
    9. Scrutinize necessary CT scanning sagittal planes, transverse planes, coronal planes and off-axis sectional anatomy images of the human anatomic body sections.
    Listed Topics
    1. Computerized tomography
    2. Analog-to-digital
    3. Keyboard devices
    4. Quantization techniques
    5. Beam attenuation
    6. Reconstruction
    7. 3D imaging
    8. Equipment configurations
    9. Contrast
    10. CT systems
    11. Slices
    12. CT x-ray field
    13. CT scanning pharmaceuticals
    14. Image interpretation
    15. Physics artifacts
    16. Electrical unit functions
    17. Spiral/helical CT scanning
    18. Human anatomic body sections
    Reference Materials
    Program faculty evaluate teaching resources and materials each year. Students will be provided with current state-of-the-art resources in class. Additionally, students will be instructed which required textbooks to purchase that contain current technical information.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


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  • CAT 202 - Cross-Sect Anat/Computed Tomography Imag


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into CAT Program
    Co-requisites: CAT 201  and CAT 203  

    Description
    This is a course in computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional anatomy for certified technologists utilizing medical cross-sectional radiographs to identify cranial, thoracic, abdominal and musculoskeletal systems. Each system will be demonstrated in a transverse, sagittal, coronal and oblique computed tomography image. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify cranium and face sectional anatomy and CT images.
    2. Identify features of a typical vertebrae and regions of the salivary glands, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, trachea, arteries, veins, thorax cage, mediastinum and abdominal region.
    3. Identify the pericardial sac, heart wall and arteries and veins.
    4. Determine the blood flow through the heart on a CT image.
    5. Locate all vascular vessels within all locations of human anatomy body regions.
    6. Interpret abdominal functions and organs in relationship to each other on CT images.
    7. Assess pelvis structures and reproductive disorders.
    8. Identify all upper and lower extremity CT images of the human body.
    9. Scrutinize necessary CT scanning sagittal planes, transverse planes, coronal planes and off-axis sectional anatomy images of the human anatomic body sections.
    Listed Topics
    1. Head and neck sectional anatomy
    2. Thorax sectional anatomy
    3. Abdomen sectional anatomy
    4. Pelvis sectional anatomy
    5. Extremities and articulations sectional anatomy
    Reference Materials
    Program faculty evaluate teaching resources and materials each year. Students will be provided with current state-of-the-art resources in class. Additionally, students will be instructed which required textbooks to purchase that contain current technical information.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


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  • CAT 203 - Patient Care/Rad Safety Imaging Tech


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Acceptance into CAT Program
    Co-requisites: CAT 201  and CAT 202  

    Description
    This is a course in computed radiographic patient care and safety for certified technologists. Included are the principles of radiation protection for the patient, computed scanning technologist and medical team. Production and control of the computed x-ray beam for scanning procedures and equipment techniques are studied. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify potential risks from radiation delivered by a CT scanner to the patient.
    2. Identify patient safety guidelines as required prior to a CT scanning procedure.
    3. Identify special instructions necessary for patients that undergo CT scanning examinations.
    4. Determine patient care and comfort techniques utilized before, during and post CT scanning procedures.
    5. Evaluate the role cultural diversity plays in the communication process and communicate effectively with patients from different cultures.
    6. Interpret moral, ethical and legal issues relevant to the field of health care.
    7. Assess “standard of care” and “scope of practice” as they relate to Radiology and CT scanning.
    8. Identify the process of informed consent.
    9. Scrutinize necessary patient care precautions necessary to produce CT scanning images utilizing sagittal planes, transverse planes, coronal planes and off-axis sectional anatomy images of the human anatomic body sections.
    Listed Topics
    1. Potential risks from CT scanning procedures
    2. Patient safety guidelines
    3. Patient monitoring requirements
    4. Career opportunities for CT technologists
    5. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Code of Ethics
    6. Informed consent
    7. Isolation procedures
    8. Contrast injections and patient care procedures
    9. Medications
    10. Life threatening situations
    Reference Materials
    Program faculty evaluate teaching resources and materials each year. Students will be provided with current state-of-the-art resources in class. Additionally, students will be instructed which required textbooks to purchase that contain current technical information.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    • Culture Society & Citizenship
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CAT 204C - Clin Appl/Comp Tomography


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours 240 Cooperative Ed Hours

    Prerequisites: CAT 201  CAT 202  and CAT 203  
    Co-requisites: Clinical agency assignment

    Description
    Assigned to affiliate agencies, certified technologists perform all routine and advanced computed tomography procedures under the supervision of a Radiologist and certified computed tomography (CT) scan technologist. The student gains experience in imaging techniques, quality assurance, axial, coronal and sagittal sectional procedures. Clinical education assignments are made by faculty and students are responsible for their own transportation, parking and meals. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. This course requires a per credit health career fee; check the tuition and fee schedule for the current rate. Students will be charged for radiation badges.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate to the clinical staff and Radiologists proper CT scanning techniques for each examine assigned.
    2. Utilize proper patient care protocols for each assigned scanning procedure.
    3. Utilize special instructions necessary for patients that undergo a CT scan.
    4. Manipulate all the computer systems to produce quality CT images.
    5. Calculate medication doses under direct supervision of qualified medical staff.
    6. Employ emergency patient care techniques as required.
    7. Demonstrate the use of proper “standard of care” and “scope of practice” methods and protocols as required within a Radiology and CT department.
    8. Utilize all the necessary steps for the process of informed consent.
    9. Produce quality CT scanning images while utilizing necessary patient care precautions prior to, during and after sagittal planes, transverse planes, coronal planes and off-axis sectional anatomy images of the human anatomic body sections.
    Listed Topics
    1. Potential risks from CT scanning procedures
    2. Patient safety guidelines
    3. Patient monitoring requirements
    4. Scope of Practice and Standard of Care Procedures
    5. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Code of Ethics
    6. Informed consent
    7. Isolation procedures
    8. Contrast injections and patient care procedures
    9. Medications
    10. Life threatening situations
    11. Sectional anatomy
    12. Image production and evaluation
    Reference Materials
    Clinical Competency Handbook for CT Program. Additionally, students are provided with all the requirements as outlined by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Task Inventories for CT Scanning required to be completed under supervision by qualified clinical agency staff.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Quantitative & Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 02/27/2020


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Computer & Information Technology

  
  • CIT 100 - Computer Fundamentals and Applications


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This is a general computer literacy course. Students learn computer fundamentals (hardware, software, using a Microsoft Windows operating system), essential applications (word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software), working online (networks, Internet and email) and the impact of computing and the Internet on society. Students develop skills with common applications to use a computer as a tool, make informed decisions concerning computer generated information and obtain basic information systems concepts and terminology.
    Learning Outcomes
    The learning outcomes are consistent with many of the requirements of Internet and Computing Core Certification (IC3), an industry-recognized certification program that covers a broad range of computing knowledge and skills to prove competency in essential computer areas. The IC3 is a global, validated, standards-based training and certification program for basic computer and Internet knowledge and skills.

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify hardware components, their functions and performance issues in various computer systems and the factors involved in purchasing a computer system.
    2. Identify different types of software, their relationship to hardware, their function in a computer system, their task- appropriate use and considerations involved in purchasing and upgrading software.
    3. Identify the role of an operating system such as Microsoft Windows and how to use its features such as modifying the user interface, changing system settings, managing files and installing/uninstalling software.
    4. Use common application interface elements and commands for creating, opening, formatting, editing, saving and printing files.
    5. Produce word processing documents using basic functions, graphics, tables and automated formatting tools in an application such as Microsoft Word.
    6. Generate spreadsheets using formulas, functions, formatting, charts, tables, sorting and filtering in an application such as Microsoft Excel.
    7. Construct effectively designed and formatted presentations in an application such as Microsoft PowerPoint.
    8. Identify network fundamentals and the benefits and risks of network computing.
    9. Investigate Internet fundamentals, including browser options, security considerations, search tools and content evaluation.
    10. Critique the influence of computing and the Internet on society, including privacy, legal and ethical issues.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of computer systems
    2. Hardware components and how they interact with software
    3. Factors involved in purchasing a computer
    4. Types of software (systems and applications)
    5. Types of systems software (operating system and utilities)
    6. Operating system features and commands
    7. Common elements of application software interfaces
    8. Different types of application software (word processing, spreadsheets, presentation, and browsers)
    9. Features and use of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation and browser software
    10. Network fundamentals
    11. Internet features and usage
    12. Impact of computing and the Internet of society
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 102 - Computer Keyboarding for Professional Communications


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and the Internet.

     
    Description
    This course provides a mastery of the keyboard (letters, numbers and symbols) by touch on a personal computer using Microsoft Word. Students facilitate typing skills by generating and formatting mailable letters, memos, tables and reports. The minimum typing speed at end of the course is 30 words per minute (WPM) accurately.

    NOTE: This course cannot be used to satisfy a required CIT elective in any program.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Type a minimum of 30 WPM on a three-minute timed writing with three or fewer errors.
    2. Develop good work habits, acceptable typing technique and posture when using a personal computer and printer.
    3. Edit content and format of documents by recognizing, evaluating and correcting errors.
    4. Demonstrate skill in language arts including word division, proofreading, punctuation, grammar, spelling and keyboard composing.
    5. Produce professionally formatted business documents including letters, memos, tables and reports using Microsoft Word.
    Listed Topics
    1. “Touch” method for alphanumeric, symbol keys and 10-key keypad using a personal computer keyboard
    2. Technique for data entry from straight and rough-draft text
    3. Techniques (formatting, posture, etc.) for text entry on a keyboard
    4. Proofreading alphanumeric and numeric data
    5. Business correspondence: letters, memos, tables and report preparation
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Communication
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


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  • CIT 111 - Introduction to Programming: Java


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system, eligibility for MAT 090 .

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to software development using the Java programming language.  Students create basic Java applications using algorithm development and problem-solving strategies.  Topics include the software development process, Java language basics, data type representations and storage considerations, Graphical User Interface (GUI), program control structures, methods and parameter passing, one-dimensional arrays and Object-Oriented Programming (OOP).


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply algorithm development and problem-solving techniques to create Java applications.
    2. Utilize a Java Integrated Development Environment (IDE) to enter, compile, execute, test and debug Java applications.
    3. Choose the appropriate data type representations in a Java application.
    4. Create a simple GUI to interface with Java applications.
    5. Implement control structures in a Java application.
    6. Apply methods and parameter passing in a Java application.
    7. Apply the array data structure in a Java application.
    8. Utilize classes and methods found in the Java Application Programming Interface (API).
    9. Create OOP user-defined classes and methods that interface with a GUI.
    Listed Topics
    1. Computer systems and environments, including computer organization, procedural programming and OOP
    2. Algorithm development and problem-solving strategies
    3. Java IDE facilities for creating, testing and debugging applications
    4. Program language variables, data types, arithmetic operators and simple input and output
    5. Implicit and explicit type casting
    6. Program control structures using relational/logical operators to form Boolean expressions, decision (if/if-else) and iteration
    7. Methods, parameter passing and return types
    8. Array data structure design and implementation
    9. Classes and objects
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • CIT 115 - Information Technology Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system.

     
    Description
    This course explores technical issues involved with computers and information technology. Students will be able to set up a basic workstation, conduct basic software installation, establish basic network connectivity, identify compatibility issues, identify/prevent basic security risks and demonstrate knowledge in the areas of safety and preventative maintenance of computers. This course prepares students considering a career in Information Technology (IT) or desiring a more detailed knowledge of IT fundamentals.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain the function and features found in common operating systems and applications.
    2. Demonstrate best practices in information technology.
    3. Explain the purpose of internal computer components and basic peripherals.
    4. Compare and contrast different methods of sharing, storage and backup of data.
    5. Perform appropriate steps to set up a basic workstation and router.
    6. Implement basic support concepts.
    7. Identify basic security threats and web-browsing best practices.
    8. Describe the importance and impact of various environmental and safety concepts.
    9. Identify alternative technologies and their purpose.
    Listed Topics
    1. Types of operating systems, their basic functions and software/hardware compatibility
    2. Types of applications (productivity, collaboration, utility, specialized)
    3. Application platforms (mobile, desktop, Web-based) and common file types
    4. Software best management practices (install/uninstall, patching/updates, version identification, licensing)
    5. Alternative technologies (virtualization, cloud computing, Web apps, VoIP, gesture-based interaction)
    6. Wireless device software features (unlocking, Bluetooth pairing, wireless setup, email configuration, synchronization, app stores)
    7. Input and output devices and their common computer connector types
    8. Internal computer components (CPU, power supply, RAM, storage, expansion cards, motherboard, cooling)
    9. Security threats (malware, phishing, social engineering, spam, password cracking, physical security)
    10. Security best practices (password management, device hardening, secure WiFi, multifactor authentication, suspicious emails, admin versus user versus guest accounts)
    11. Web browsing best practices (secure protocols, certificate warnings, suspicious links and banner ads, adware, suspicious plugins, autofill forms, cookies, browser history, public workstations)
    12. Configuring a wired or wireless router
    13. Cellular, wireless and wired data connections
    14. Local versus network storage and printing
    15. Workstation set-up
    16. Basic support concepts
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 117 - Computer Organization


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 130 , Eligibility for MAT 108  

     
    Description
    In this course, students acquire an understanding of how a computer system’s hardware components impact performance of software. Students also learn about the impacts of parallelism and latency on performance as well as tradeoffs with various components such as processor clock speed, cycles per instruction, memory size and average memory access time. Problem solving is emphasized through the use of assembly language.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Diagram the digital components of a computing architecture.
    2. Explain the organization of the classical von Neumann machine and its major functional units.
    3. Describe the internal representation of non-numeric data.
    4. Convert numerical data from one format to another with justification for using alternative formats.
    5. Create assembly language program segments, which demonstrate how high-level language patterns map to assembly/machine language.
    6. Explain the basic concepts of interrupts and input/output operations at the hardware and system software level.
    7. List the main types of memory technologies, noting the effect of memory latency on execution time across the memory hierarchy.
    Listed Topics
    1. Digital logic and digital systems
    2. Machine level representation of data
    3. Assembly level machine organization and programming
    4. Memory system organization and architecture
    Reference Materials
    Appropriate textbook covering topics on computer organization, assembly language and performance.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 119 - Python Programming, Experimental


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system; eligibility for MAT 090 .

     
    Description
    This course introduces computer programming using the Python programming language. Emphasis is placed on common data types, control flow, object-oriented programming and graphical user interface-driven applications utilizing the standard library distributed with Python.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Design an algorithmic solution to solve a problem.
    2. Create and use variables of appropriate types to store program data.
    3. Formulate program instructions to perform computations.
    4. Design and use selection structures in a program.
    5. Design and use repetition structures in a program.
    6. Create lists and other data structures to store large volume of data.
    7. Compose functions and integrate them in a program.
    8. Utilize Python built-in functions and modules.
    9. Understand principles of object oriented programming.
    10. Use class and other object oriented programming techniques in a program.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Computers and Programming
    2. Input, Processing, and Output
    3. Decision Structures and Boolean Logic
    4. Repetition Structures
    5. Functions and Modules
    6. Files and Exceptions
    7. Lists and Tuples
    8. Classes and Object-Oriented Programming
    9. Inheritance
    10. GUI Programming
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook, current version of software, multimedia, internet and Web server account.


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 120 - Networking


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 115  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to computer networking fundamentals. Topics include: network design, network hardware, network operating systems software, data communications, configuration and installation, internetworking, and troubleshooting basic network problems. Using a Microsoft Windows Server-based LAN environment, students practice network administration concepts and activities.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    The student will have knowledge to assist others in the implementation and administration of simple LAN-based networks, particularly those using a Windows Server environment. The student should be capable of assisting an administrator within this environment. These outcomes are based, in part, on the proscribed topics listed in the 2000 ACM Guidelines for Associate Degree Programs to Support Computing in a Networked Environment (http://www.acmtyc.org/2000Guidelines.cfm) at the indicated expected proficiency level.

    COMPUTING WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION ENVIRONMENT:

    1. Identify and document user requirements for network client and server hardware, software, and services (application),
    2. Describe appropriate procedures & techniques for disaster prevention & recovery (application),
    3. Describe appropriate security procedures and practices, including security and protection of resources through software measures (application),
    4. Identify and discuss software licensing, privacy, and encryption issues (comprehension)

    DOCUMENTATION & TECHNICAL REFERENCES:

    1. Locate, read and interpret technical documentation (application),
    2. Effectively use locally maintained systems, software, and network documentation (application)

    COMPUTER SOFTWARE:

    1. Identify current operating systems and describe their important features (comprehension),
    2. Use system software to perform routine maintenance tasks such as backup, defragmentation, etc. (application),
    3. Make configuration changes to an operating system to optimize performance (comprehension),
    4. Install and configure client software for connecting to LANs, WANs, and the Internet (network client, browser, terminal emulation, file transfer, etc) (comprehension)

    TROUBLESHOOTING:

    1. Use effective troubleshooting strategies and techniques to resolve network problems, including network interfaces, cabling, or other network components (comprehension),
    2. Use utilities such as ping, telnet, and tracert in testing a network (application),
    3. Recognize and resolve complex network problems, including installation and configuration of server, client, NIC, cable, hub or network peripherals (comprehension)

    NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS:

    1. Describe current network environments, such as peer-to-peer and client/server (comprehension),
    2. Identify and discuss issues related to networked environments (security, privacy, redundancy) (comprehension),
    3. List and define layers in the OSI network protocol model (comprehension),
    4. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of each network topology (comprehension),
    5. Describe the major functions LAN protocols such as Ethernet, token ring and FDDI (comprehension),
    6. Describe software protocols such as IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, and NetBEUI (comprehension),
    7. Discuss the nature of IP addresses and MAC addresses, and mapping between protocol addressing schemes (comprehension)

    NETWORK HARDWARE

    1. Describe the major functions of network server hardware components (comprehension),
    2. Recognize and describe current cable technologies such as twisted-pair, coaxial and fiber optic (comprehension),
    3. Describe current wireless technologies such as satellite, microwave, and RF (comprehension),
    4. Describe the major functions of network connectivity hardware, such as NICS, hubs/switches, routers (comprehension),
    5. Describe the hardware needed to connect a LAN to the Internet (comprehension),
    6. Describe the function of network storage devices and other peripherals (comprehension),
    7. Describe the requirements for connecting peripherals directly to a network (comprehension),
    8. Set up and configure server and client hardware (including the installation of NICs and NIC drivers) (application)

    NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEMS SOFTWARE:

    1. Describe the major functions of network server components (comprehension),
    2. Install and configure drivers for NICs and network peripherals (application),
    3. Configure a server and client for multiple network protocols and frame types (application)

    DATA COMMUNICATIONS:

    1. Compare and contrast digital communications lines and cable characteristics (e.g., ISDN, DSL, T-1, T-3) (comprehension),
    2. Describe ATM technology; discuss the functions and applications of this technology (comprehension),
    3. Describe the functioning of modems, their features and operating characteristics (comprehension),
    4. Compare and contrast major data communications media in terms of data flow, data codes, and transmission codes (comprehension),
    5. Define common error detection and correction mechanisms (comprehension),
    6. Identify, compare and contrast LAN access control methods (CSMA/CD, token passing) (comprehension),
    7. Describe asynchronous and synchronous serial link protocols (comprehension),
    8. Identify and describe file transfer protocols and methodologies (comprehension),
    9. Describe data compression methodologies used for file transfer (comprehension),
    10. Identify evolving issues, such as gigabit transmission requirements, voice over IP, and wireless technologies (comprehension)

    INTERNETWORKING:

    1. Describe and differentiate between WAN and MAN topologies (comprehension),
    2. Identify and describe WAN protocols (comprehension),
    3. Explain how the first three layers of the OSI model related to routing and switching (comprehension),
    4. Differentiate among routing, switching, and bridging (comprehension),
    5. Describe the functions and characteristics of firewalls (comprehension)

    NETWORK ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT:

    1. Manage user accounts (application),
    2. Assign users appropriate rights to files, applications, and resources (application),
    3. Perform backup and recovery procedures and validation (application),
    4. Discuss the issues associated with single sign-on, password synchronization, and user authentication (comprehension),
    5. Effectively use network management tools to integrate and manage network resources (comprehension)
    Listed Topics
    1. Computing within the organization environment (requirements analysis, HW/SW evaluation, disaster prevention and recovery, ethics & legal issues, job opportunities and career paths)
    2. Documentation and technical references (technical documents, system documentation, online research)
    3. Computer software (systems software, applications software, software installation)
    4. Troubleshooting (network troubleshooting)
    5. Networking fundamentals (networked environments, models and standards, LAN topologies, LAN protocols & standards)
    6. Network hardware (server requirements, client requirements, transmission media, connectivity HW, peripherals, installation and configuration)
    7. Network operating systems software (server SW, client SW)
    8. Data communications (digital communications, devices, data flow, access control methods, protocols)
    9. Internetworking (WAN topologies, OSI model, security)
    10. Network administration and management (typical administrator functions, performance tuning)
    Reference Materials
    • The course will use a current and appropriate text on networking essentials (relevant materials for CompTIA’s Network+ certification are appropriate) and a text or classhandouts related to network administration activities under Microsoft Windows Server. (Where possible, the text should be the same across all campuses.)
    • Students need access to a networked LAN computer classroom that is not connected to the overall college network. Computers need to be running Microsoft client and server operating systems.

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 02/19/2004


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  • CIT 125 - Web Development


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system; high school Algebra.

     
    Description
    This course focuses on developing skills necessary to design, create, and enhance Web pages for personal and business use. Students will acquire hands-on experience in creating and publishing Web pages that include text, hyperlinks, images, tables, frames, forms, sound, and video. Topics include: Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, XML, Graphics and other web media, and Web site development using a web authoring tool.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the evolution of the Internet and the World Wide Web and outline the client/server model.
    2. Explain Internet protocols, URLs, and domain names.
    3. Employ markup tags to create Web pages containing text, lists, hyperlinks, images, tables, forms and frames.
    4. Create and use Cascading Style Sheets in writing example Web pages.
    5. Create and use basic JavaScript to illustrate web page interactivity.
    6. Describe server-side technologies such as CGI, and ASP which are used to develop web page interactivity.
    7. Describe the different types of available web media used to create Web pages and write example Web pages using available web media.
    8. Explain and put into action recommended guidelines for web site design, organization and development in the creation of a web site.
    9. Use a web authoring tool to create web pages and develop a web site.
    10. Create and use XML to create simple XML documents.
    Listed Topics
    1. Network overview and the client/server model
    2. Internet history and ethical use of information
    3. Internet standards, protocols, URLs and domain names
    4. Basic markup language tags
    5. Enhancing Web pages with color, images and text formatting
    6. Creating tables, frames and forms
    7. Creating Cascading Style Sheets
    8. Developing a web site using a WYSIWYG authoring tool
    9. Developing web page interactivity using JavaScript, CGI and ASP
    10. Introduction to XML
    11. Using a graphics editor
    Reference Materials
    To deliver the course, the following resources are necessary: a current and appropriate textbook; current and appropriate version of software; multimedia for lecture and demonstration; Internet access; and a CCAC Web server account for Web publishing. The same resources should be available across all campuses and centers.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/18/2009


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  • CIT 129 - Python 2: Algorithms, modeling and data processing, Experimental


    Credits: 3
    1 Lecture Hours 2 Lab Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 119

     
    Description
    Building on language foundations developed in Python 1, this second semester python course focuses on the  language’s powerful file processing and data manipulation tools.  Students will explore core libraries that allow programs to access operating system services, manipulate data of many types, interact with the user through graphical user
    interfaces (GUIs), and crunch out data metrics. This fast-paced course is project-focused and builds not only python programming skills but also best practices in object-oriented software design.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and load a python library suitable for processing files of a given type.
    2. Integrate an operating system process into a given program, making use of core python OS-related objects.
    3. Create instances of the core python graphical user interface (GUI) components: buttons, text boxes, select boxes and images
    4. Use data-display related GUI components to convey meaningful information extracted from a simple data set.
    5. Implement a user-centered design in python and gather user feedback to a prototype.
    6. Model the core phases of smart algorithm design with a simple, non-technical design problem.
    7. Convert a given algorithm written in English into working python code and test its functionality.
    8. Design and implement a new algorithm to solve a technical problem.
    9. Creatively design and implement a simulation of a given human or system interaction using best practices in design phases.
    10. Using a version control system, like git, curate an online portfolio of working and documented python code from at least 2 course projects.
    11. Effectively discuss their python skills and their applications to an employer during a practice interview.
    Listed Topics
    1. File types and python object adapters
    2. Looping through files with dictionaries
    3. File-based data stores
    4. Operating system interaction
    5. User-interface GUI components
    6. Data display GUI components
    7. GUI Design through user interview
    8. User-centered design
    9. Top-down design approach
    10. Psuedocode versions of algorithms
    11. Algorithm implementation in python
    12. Searching, sorting, and traversal algorithms
    13. Monte carlo simulations
    14. Simulation design phases
    15. Model and unit testing
    16. Technical interview preparation
    Reference Materials
    Print Book: Python Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science, 2nd Edition, by John
    Zelle, Franklin, Beedle, and Associates Independent Press. Amazon link.
    Online learning tool: Code Academy’s Interactive Python programming course
    Python Software Foundation’s Python 2.7 Language reference


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  • CIT 130 - Object-Oriented Programming 1: Java


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 111  or successful completion of a college-level computer programming course.

     
    Description
    This course builds upon the technical computer programming skills gained in CIT 111  and expands on the software development process concepts.  Students review Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) concepts and applications, as well as software engineering standards and principles.  Topics include the Unified Modeling Language (UML), Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) and event handling, string and array processing, searching and sorting algorithms, class hierarchies, inheritance concepts and applications, abstract and interface classes, simple database integration and software security assurances.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create UML diagrams to reflect the class compositions.
    2. Implement OOP design into Java applications.
    3. Apply the Java Application Programming Interface (API) classes and methods to create GUI classes with event handling.
    4. Apply Java language elements to include string processing techniques in a program.
    5. Create programs using arrays of primitives and objects.
    6. Design Java applications to include searching and sorting implementations.
    7. Create OOP solutions that incorporate class hierarchies, inheritance and polymorphism.
    8. Produce OOP solutions that include abstract and interface classes.
    9. Create Java applications that interface with database technology.
    10. Implement data validation and exception handling in Java applications to mitigate security vulnerabilities.

     Listed Topics

    1. OOP program structure, data types, decision and control structures
    2. UML diagrams
    3. Classes and their constructors
    4. GUIs and event handling
    5. Reusable code, scope, overloading and overriding
    6. Integrated development environment (IDE) use in testing and debugging plans and techniques
    7. String processing techniques
    8. Arrays of primitives and class objects
    9. Searching and sorting algorithms and implementations
    10. Class hierarchies, inheritance and polymorphism
    11. Abstract and interface classes
    12. Database integration
    13. Data validation, exception handling and security assurances
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • CIT 140 - Office Productivity Applications


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer, eligibility for MAT 090 .

     
    Description
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills involved with common office productivity applications. Student learn the features and functions of the Excel spreadsheet application as well as the Access database application. Students learn to effectively use and integrate data from spreadsheets with a database in the development of solutions for business-oriented problems. Critical thinking and quantitative reasoning through project-based activities is emphasized.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Manage spreadsheet worksheets and workbooks.
    2. Demonstrate effective spreadsheet workbook management techniques.
    3. Manage data cells, ranges and tables within a spreadsheet.
    4. Apply custom data formats and layouts within a spreadsheet.
    5. Perform spreadsheet operations with formulas and functions.
    6. Create advanced formulas, charts and tables within a spreadsheet.
    7. Manage a simple relational database.
    8. Create tables, queries, forms and reports within a relational database.
    9. Devise business-oriented solutions involving simple relational database design and its integration with a spreadsheet for data analysis purposes.
    Listed Topics
    The following topics are based in part on those items specified by Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) for Excel, Excel Expert and Access certification.

    1. Excel workbook and worksheet creation, formatting, options, navigation and distribution
    2. Excel cell formats, ranges and organization
    3. Excel formulas, functions, data analysis, conditional operations and troubleshooting
    4. Excel table creation, styles, filtering, sorting and distribution
    5. Excel chart creation and formatting
    6. Access exported tables, table creation, fields and records
    7. Access query controls, calculated fields and grouping
    8. Access form controls and formats
    9. Access report controls and formats
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Quantitative and Scientific Reasoning
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


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  • CIT 141 - Word Processing


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and Windows operating system, keyboarding and some basic exposure to Microsoft Office

     
    Description
    This course introduces basic and intermediate word processing concepts and applications. Topics include preparation of a variety of documents and mastery of specialized software functions. Upon completion, students should be able to work effectively in a computerized word processing environment using Microsoft Word.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create a document.
    2. Format characters, paragraphs and pages.
    3. Manipulate shapes, pictures, text boxes and SmartArt.
    4. Create form letters, mailing labels and directories.
    5. Create tables.
    6. Create customized themes and styles.
    7. Create macros.
    8. Insert graphic elements.
    9. Create specialized tables and indexes.
    10. Prepare shared documents.
    Listed Topics
    1. Document design and best practices
    2. Format options for characters, paragraphs and pages
    3. Object manipulation
    4. Mail merge methods for letters, envelopes, labels and directories
    5. Styles and themes
    6. Macros
    7. Specialized tables and indexes
    8. Document sharing and collaboration
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • CIT 142 - Desktop Publishing Concepts


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 141   or instructor’s permission.

     
    Description
    This course introduces the fundamentals of word and image production using a personal computer. This course provides hands-on development that emphasizes the elements of page composition, publication design, text construction, graphs and business applications. Upon completion, students should be able to work effectively in producing flyers, proposals and brochures in a computerized office environment using a word-processing application such as Microsoft Word.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify desktop publishing tools and their proper use.
    2. Identify the basic elements of design.
    3. Manipulate design elements to have the desired effect.
    4. Compose newsletter, newspaper, advertisement, sales promotion, business document and form layouts.
    5. Manipulate pictures using digital editing hardware and software.
    6. Identify potential legal problems with published material.
    7. Create a published product from concept to final product
    Listed Topics
    1. Software and hardware involved with document layout, illustration, image editing
    2. Publishing applications such as Microsoft Word
    3. Typefaces, element position, white/grey/black space, contrast, repetition, alignment and proximity
    4. Page and document layout, article placement, captions, headlines for newsletters and newspaper layouts
    5. Element placement for sales promotions, business documents and forms
    6. Scanner settings to affect image quality, use of digital editing hardware and software, identifying different digital printing media
    7. Real-world project evaluation for appropriate format and content
    8. Digital printing media
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • CIT 145 - Programming in C


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 111  or strong previous programming experience.

     
    Description
    This course provides a working knowledge of the C programming language. The focus of the course includes program structure, data types and variables, input and output, control structures, user-defined functions, bit operators, arrays, pointers and an introduction to data structures. This course is C programming for programmers and not an introduction to programming using C.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create algorithmic solutions to coding problems.
    2. Create programs using C input/output functions.
    3. Create programs using various control structures.
    4. Develop programs using functions available in the C standard library.
    5. Design programs using user-defined functions.
    6. Write programs to include data structures.
    7. Demonstrate a mastery of pointers.
    8. Program bit manipulator operators.
    9. Design programs to include file processing.
    Listed Topics
    1. C program structure
    2. Data types and variable declarations
    3. C standard input and output streams and statements
    4. C control structures
    5. C standard library functions
    6. User-defined functions and parameter passing
    7. Arrays, pointers and strings
    8. Structures, unions and bit manipulation operators
    9. File processing
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/14/2019


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  • CIT 150 - Computer Technical Support


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 115  

     
    Description
    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills consistent with the objectives for CompTIA A+ certification to install, maintain, customize and operate a personal computer system. Topics include: system architecture, boot process, command line interface, motherboards, memory, installing and optimizing storage devices, input/output devices, managing and supporting a Windows operating system environment, networked computers, printers, mobile devices and troubleshooting fundamentals.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Configure and troubleshoot PC hardware and operating system components.
    2. Evaluate device characteristics required for different situations and users.
    3. Implement disaster prevention and recovery methods.
    4. Configure and troubleshoot basic networking devices.
    5. Manage mobile devices and mobile device security.
    6. Implement tools to detect, remove and prevent malware.
    7. Utilize the appropriate Windows commands, utilities and tools to evaluate and resolve common operating system issues.
    Listed Topics
    1. CPU characteristics
    2. Types of storage devices and backup media
    3. Motherboard components
    4. Power supplies and cooling methods
    5. Memory types and characteristics
    6. Display device characteristics and video adapters
    7. Input and output devices
    8. Mobile devices and laptop computers
    9. Windows systems administration tools
    10. Boot sequence
    11. Security features and best practices
    12. Troubleshooting techniques and diagnostic tools
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/material, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor, access to the Internet.

    While not a course designed to fully prepare students for CompTIA’s A+ certification exams, textbooks that support this material and concepts are appropriate.

    When taught in a classroom, a work area containing a PC with the proper hardware and operating system environment is required for performing labs that involve operating system settings and replacing hardware components. When taught online, software-based simulators can be used for this purpose.


    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • CIT 155 - Excel Spreadsheets


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and Windows operating system, keyboarding and basic exposure to Microsoft Office.  Ability to effectively manage Windows files and folders.  Eligibility for MAT 090 .

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to electronic spreadsheets, tables and charts for solving business and technical problems using Microsoft Excel. Students learn through applied and project-based activities that go beyond the mechanics of the software. Students utilize critical thinking activities for applied learning and problem solving. Topics include statistical, mathematical, financial and data analytical functions.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Create effective worksheets and workbooks with formulas and functions.
    2. Create and manage Excel tables, charts, PivotTables and PivotCharts.
    3. Perform data analysis using What-If, Goal Seek, Scenario Manager and Solver.
    4. Look up data using advanced functions.
    5. Prepare workbooks for collaboration.
    6. Create and modify macros.
    7. Apply advanced conditional formatting and filtering.
    Listed Topics
    1. Excel workbook fundamentals
    2. Formulas and functions
    3. Cell, worksheet and workbook enhancements
    4. Charts and chart tools
    5. Pivot tables, charts and slicers
    6. Workbook management
    7. Advanced worksheet formatting
    8. Advanced functions and formulas
    9. Data analysis tools
    10. Macro management
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/material, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor, access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • CIT 161 - Visual Basic: Windows Programming


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 111  or previous experience with an object-oriented programming language.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to developing applications for a Windows environment using Visual Basic. The course emphasizes designing graphical user interfaces/dialogues and event-driven programming. Topics include creating and using classes, the design of the graphical user interface, human/computer interaction, testing and evaluation, rapid prototyping, design tools, database access with SQL, and ADO.NET.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Build full-featured Windows applications that provide fast and effective solutions to business needs.
    2. Demonstrate proper graphical user interface design utilizing menus, controls, icons, dialogue and color; implement user navigation.
    3. Develop Windows-based application programs utilizing various features such as menus, common Windows dialogs, ADO.NET, database access with error validation and SQL.
    4. Create Windows components using visual inheritance.
    5. Use Visual Basic as a front end to a database to consume and manipulate data.
    6. Demonstrate essential concepts of human/computer interaction and error-handling, debugging and testing that is required in creating an effective application.
    7. Adhere to Windows standards in the development of Visual Basic programs.
    Listed Topics
    1. Application development using object oriented, event driven design
    2. Objects: classes, properties, methods, events, inheritance, collections
    3. Designing applications: user interface, windows standards, forms, common controls, events, code and variables
    4. Controlling program execution: functions and procedures, control structures, debugging
    5. Data structures including single and multi-dimensional arrays
    6. Menus, String processing, dialogs, error trapping
    7. File Handling
    8. Developing database applications using ADO.NET and SQL
    Reference Materials
    1. The course will use a current and appropriate text on Visual Basic and class handouts as required.
    2. Students need access to a computer classroom with Internet access under Windows and with Visual Studio that includes Visual Basic.

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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  • CIT 175 - Cyberspace Vulnerabilities and Risks


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Cybersecurity, such as cybersecurity goals, vulnerabilities, threats and risks. Students also learn to use the methods and tools for cybersecurity vulnerability scanning and risk assessment.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Explain cybersecurity goals, policies and standards.
    2. Differentiate identification, authentication and authorization.
    3. Describe classification levels of information assets.
    4. Define cybersecurity vulnerabilities, threats and risks.
    5. Describe access control models and methods.
    6. Describe security vulnerabilities and risks in various cyberspace settings.
    7. Apply quantitative and qualitative approaches to cybersecurity risk assessment.
    8. Conduct cybersecurity vulnerability scanning using software tools.
    9. Describe information security models.
    10. Explain the security benefits of virtualization.
    Listed Topics
    1. Cybersecurity goals, policies and standards
    2. Identification, authentication and authorization
    3. Classification of information assets
    4. Cybersecurity vulnerabilities, threats and risks
    5. Access control models and methods
    6. Various cyberspace settings with security vulnerabilities and risks
    7. Approaches to cybersecurity risk assessment
    8. Cybersecurity vulnerability scanning tools
    9. Information security models
    10. Security benefits of virtualization
    Reference Materials
    Appropriate materials, references and software tools will be used.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/04/2014


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  • CIT 180 - Computer Forensics 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 115  or waived with instructor approval.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the computer forensics field and technology. Students will obtain essential knowledge of the computer forensics profession, legal issues and procedures of computer investigations and digital evidence management, industry-standard computer forensic tools, file systems, data recovery and collection, and sample case evaluations. Each student is required to sign an ethical agreement with the instructor.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define basic terminology in computer forensics and digital evidence.
    2. Describe the role of computer forensics and relevant laws in a criminal investigation.
    3. Explain procedures for public and private investigations of computer crimes or incidents.
    4. Identify and prepare a computer forensic investigation and secure digital evidence.
    5. Cite and explain relevant legal ground or corporate policies for pursuing digital evidence.
    6. Identify legal or business needs for computer forensic hardware and software tools.
    7. Describe and use common industry-standard computer forensics tools.
    8. Manage digital evidence with proper retention, storage, and documentation.
    9. Describe the underlying concepts of data storage and Windows and DOS file systems.
    10. Perform basic steps in data acquisitions of disk files using a software tool.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to computer forensics, technology, and related disciplines
    2. Public enforcement investigations versus private business investigations
    3. Definitions of a computer crime, incident, and digital evidence
    4. General steps in planning and conducting a computer investigation
    5. Legal issues and procedures in collecting and securing digital evidence
    6. Search and seizure and chain of custody regarding digital evidence
    7. Windows and DOS file systems and Windows registries
    8. Computer forensic hardware and software tools
    Reference Materials
    Selected textbooks, references, and industry-standard hardware and software tools will be used.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/07/2009


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  • CIT 181 - Principles of Information Security


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 115  or waived with instructor approval.

     
    Description
    This course provides students necessary background in the technical realities and legal and theoretical principles of computer and information security to help them identify and evaluate computer security crimes and incidents. Topics include information security components and models, legal and ethical issues in information security and privacy, basics of computer networks and data communication, common computer and network system threats, attacks, and vulnerabilities, as well as information security risk and damage analysis and assessment.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define information security and describe major information security models.
    2. Discuss needs for information security and procedures of information security auditing.
    3. Identify major national and international laws that protect privacy and information security.
    4. Discuss legal, ethical and financial ramifications of information security violations.
    5. Explain the basic concepts of IP addressing and the TCP/IP protocol.
    6. Analyze network traffic and configure various Internet security settings.
    7. Identify and describe common computer and network threats, attacks and vulnerabilities.
    8. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of current information security solutions.
    9. Analyze and assess the risks and damage of business information systems.
    10. Develop information security policies or plans that address potential crimes or incidents.
    Listed Topics
    1. Information security models and components
    2. Information technology laws and ethics
    3. Business needs and customer privacy
    4. Impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act
    5. IP addressing and TCP/IP model, layers, protocols, and functions
    6. Network sniffing and data analysis
    7. Operating system and Internet security threats, attacks, and vulnerabilities
    8. Strengths and weaknesses of IDS and firewalls
    9. Information security risk management and damage assessment
    10. Information security policies and planning
    Reference Materials
    Selected textbooks, references, and industry-standard hardware and software tools will be used.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/03/2006


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  • CIT 185 - Network Security


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 175  

     
    Description
    This course highlights the models and protocols essential to securing wired and wireless networks. Students also learn to capture and analyze network traffic, identify network security threats, and apply and evaluate network security controls.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe network types and connection and data communication processes.
    2. Describe the functions of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) layers and vulnerabilities.
    3. Describe various network threats and attacks.
    4. Capture network traffic for security analysis.
    5. Analyze network traffic to identify security anomalies and attacks.
    6. Evaluate different network security solutions and controls.
    7. Apply network security safeguard solutions and tools.
    8. Conduct network security audits.
    9. Explain cryptography and public key infrastructure.
    10. Explain digital certificates and digital signatures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Network types and connection and data communication processes
    2. OSI and TCP/IP layers, functions and vulnerabilities
    3. Network threats and attacks
    4. Network traffic capture and analysis
    5. Network traffic sniffing tools
    6. Network security solutions and controls
    7. Hands-on work on network safeguards and tools
    8. Network security audits and logs
    9. Cryptography and public key infrastructure
    10. Digital certificates and digital signatures
    Reference Materials
    Appropriate materials, references and software tools will be used.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/04/2014


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  • CIT 186 - Intrusion Detection and Prevention


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 175  

     
    Description
    This course covers the basic theory and practice of detecting and preventing intrusions and attacks in cyberspace. The study emphasis is on methods and tools to monitor for and identify system vulnerabilities and threats and prevent attacks.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe internal and external intrusion threats and risks.
    2. Create intrusion event handling procedures.
    3. Identify current penetration testing tools, technique and procedures.
    4. Apply current penetration testing tools, technique and procedures.
    5. Perform network and system discovery and footprinting.
    6. Describe Intrusion Detection System/Intrusion Prevention System (IDS/IPS) principles, tools and techniques.
    7. Evaluate IDS/IPS tools.
    8. Create IDS/IPS rules and sensors to prevent and detect intrusions.
    9. Test IDS/IPS rules and sensors.
    10. Respond to detected intrusions appropriately.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internal and external intrusion threats and risks
    2. Intrusion event handling procedures
    3. Penetration testing tools, technique and procedures
    4. Hands-on work on penetration testing
    5. Network and system discovery and footprinting
    6. IDS/IPS principles, tools and techniques
    7. Strengths and weaknesses of IDS/IPS tools
    8. Hands-on work on creating IDS/IPS rules and sensors
    9. Hands-on test of IDS/IPS rules and sensors
    10. Response to intrusions and event handling
    Reference Materials
    Appropriate materials, references, and software tools will be used.
     
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/04/2014


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  • CIT 205 - Help Desk and User Support


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 115  

     
    Description
    This course focuses on information and services within an organization that requires user support specialists to enhance productivity and to resolve problems.  Topics include an overview of the user support services field, hardware and software evaluation, facilitation of product standards, needs assessment, system installation, user training, documentation preparation, troubleshooting and other forms of assistance.  Problem solving, communication skills and interpersonal relations are emphasized throughout the course.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Summarize the role and responsibilities of computer help desk and user support personnel.
    2. List examples illustrating the importance of customer service and support.
    3. Describe Help Desk operations, technologies and environments.
    4. Perform needs assessments related to current and new hardware and software requirements.
    5. Explain the need to define, communicate and enforce product standards.
    6. Summarize the use of performance standards.
    7. Identify the common processes, procedures and service levels related to customer service.
    8. Prepare appropriate documentation such as training manuals, online help and product standards guidelines.
    9. Identify the roles and responsibilities of support personnel when installing and maintaining computer software and hardware systems.
    10. Classify ergonomic factors affecting the user’s environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to technical user support
    2. Customer service skills required for user support
    3. Methodology for troubleshooting common support problems
    4. Product evaluation strategies and standards
    5. Introduction to Help Desk concepts and operations
    6. Help Desk roles and responsibilities
    7. Help Desk processes and procedures
    8. Help Desk tools and technologies
    9. Help Desk performance measures
    10. Customer support as a profession
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/material, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor, access to the Internet
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Communication
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • CIT 206 - Administrative Technology and Procedures


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 140  and CIT 141  

     
    Description
    This course provides a comprehensive foundation of office technology skills using computer programs to complete common business tasks.  Topics include document formatting, spreadsheet preparation, database analysis and creation of visual presentations. Writing skills, communication skills, record management, team work and personal skills required in today’s business office are emphasized.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the current trends in technology in today’s office environment including the virtual office.
    2. Create properly formatted business documents using various computer applications according to accepted professional styles. 
    3. Describe procedures involved with maintaining paper and electronic filing systems for records and messages.
    4. Plan business travel arrangements using the Internet.
    5. Create itineraries and expense reports.
    6. Plan meetings and conferences using online resources.
    7. Prepare outgoing mail according to USPS regulations.
    8. Discuss how to deal with common workplace issues encountered in an office environment.
    9. List techniques used to manage stress and time in a professional manner.

     Listed Topics

    1. The changing office environment
    2. Characteristics of being an effective team member
    3. Effective written communication techniques
    4. The virtual office
    5. Records management
    6. Business travel arrangements
    7. Incoming and outgoing mail management
    8. Techniques used for managing stress and time
    9. Word processing techniques using mail merge letters and labels, flyers and office specific documents
    10. Spreadsheet usage involving formulas, functions and advanced features
    11. Database creation using queries, forms and reports
    12. Visual presentations using objects and charts
    Reference Materials
    Current editions of the following (or equivalent) textbooks are recommended for this course:

    • Office Procedures for the 21st Century
    • Go! With Microsoft Office

    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 4/24/2020


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  • CIT 215 - Systems Analysis and Design


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 130   or CIT 161  or CIT 230  or permission of the instructor.

     
    Description
    In this course, students utilize a system development methodology through team-based projects that demonstrate their Information Technology skills. The focus of the course includes the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) phases, user system requirements, logical and physical design, test and implementation planning, performance evaluation, software package evaluation and acquisition, prototyping, structured and object-oriented methodologies, development and adherence to the system life cycle standards and designing interfaces and dialogues. This course encourages interpersonal skill development with clients, users, team members and others associated with development, operation and maintenance of the system.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply the tools and techniques of analysis and design needed to meet the needs and goals of an organization.
    2. Solve business problems using a systems approach. 
    3. Analyze the requirements of a simple system.
    4. Explain the role of the SDLC in the development of information systems.
    5. Formulate plans related to software package evaluation and acquisition, system testing, user training and support.
    6. Demonstrate effective communications necessary to work with clients, users, team members and others associated with development, operation and maintenance of the system.
    Listed Topics
    1. Systems development environment
    2. System requirements
    3. Process modeling and conceptual data modeling
    4. Systems planning and selection
    5. Alternative design strategies
    6. Object-oriented analysis and design
    7. Rapid application development and case tools
    8. Effective human interface and database design
    9. Project management
    10. Systems implementation and operation
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Communication
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


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  • CIT 220 - Linux Operating System


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 115  

     
    Description
    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills consistent with the objectives for CompTIA Linux+ certification to configure, monitor and support servers running the Linux operating system using security best practices, scripting and automation. Topics include system architecture, package management, shell commands, file systems, administrative tasks, network configuration, system security and troubleshooting fundamentals.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Configure hardware settings, run levels and shutdown options.
    2. Install a boot manager with shared libraries.
    3. Use various tools to perform package management.
    4. Use shell commands to administer the system, perform basic file management, manage processes, create scripts and perform basic file editing.
    5. Create partitions, file systems, disk quotas and file permissions.
    6. Set up a display manager.
    7. Manage user and group accounts and related system files.
    8. Manage printers and printing.
    9. Configure and troubleshoot basic client-server networks.
    10. Perform essential security administration tasks.
    Listed Topics
    1. System architecture
    2. Installation and package management
    3. GNU and Unix commands
    4. Devices and Linux filesystems
    5. Shells, scripting and data management
    6. User interfaces and desktops
    7. Administrative tasks
    8. Essential system services
    9. Networking fundamentals
    10. Security
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/material, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor, access to the Internet.

    While not a course designed to fully prepare students for CompTIA’s Linux+ certification exams, textbooks that support this material and concepts are appropriate.

    When taught in a classroom, a work area containing a PC with the proper hardware and operating system environment is required for performing labs that involve operating system settings. When taught online, software-based simulators can be used for this purpose.


    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    Approved By: Dr. Quintin B. Bullock Date Approved: 01/02/2020


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  • CIT 230 - Database Systems


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 111  or CIT 130  or CIT 145  or CIT 161  or permission of the instructor.

     
    Description
    This course covers information systems design and implementation within a database management system (DBMS) environment.  Students learn to create data models of user’s needs, gain foundation skills in database design and learn to use standard Structured Query Language (SQL) to interact with databases. The focus of the course includes the relational database model, the Entity-Relationship (E-R) model, SQL, database design and implementation, database normalization and multiuser DBMS administrative management.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of database design terminology, concepts and applications.
    2. Create data modeling using the Entity-Relationship (E-R) model.
    3. Construct a database using SQL.
    4. Demonstrate application processing using SQL.
    5. Create a database application system with a representative DBMS that includes appropriate programming procedures, form, report and menu/applications generators.
    6. Identify DBMS administrative functions, including concurrency control, database security and recovery processes.
    Listed Topics
    1. Database concepts and terminology
    2. The relational model
    3. Structured Query Language (SQL)
    4. The Entity-Relationship (E-R) model
    5. Database normalization
    6. DBMS design and implementation
    7. Programming methodology for automating procedures: syntax, control structures and algorithm development
    8. DBMS administrative functions, concurrency controls and database security
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


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  • CIT 244 - Object-Oriented Programming 2/Java


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 130  

     
    Description
    This course builds on the concepts of software design and development introduced in CIT 130  . Review basic Object-Oriented design and program structure in the creation of Java applications. The focus of this course is on Object-Oriented design data encapsulation, graphical user interfaces, exception handling, multi-threading, Input/Output processes and data structures.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Employ inheritance, polymorphism and encapsulation by implementing interface and abstract classes.
    2. Create advanced Swing graphical user interface (GUI) components in a program.
    3. Apply Java language elements to use error and exception handling techniques in a program.
    4. Apply Java language elements to use Input/Output streams and file access methods in a program.
    5. Apply Java language elements to create programs with multi-dimension arrays of primitives and objects.
    6. Apply Java language elements to create programs utilizing inheritance and class hierarchies.
    7. Implement ArrayLists using queues and stacks.
    8. Use predefined application programming interface (API) Java collection classes to manage data in a program.
    9. Apply multi-threading techniques in a Java program.
    Listed Topics
    1. Object-Oriented design
    2. Interpret unified modeling language (UML)
    3. Java API
    4. Exception handling
    5. Multi-threading
    6. Data structures
    7. Abstract classes, class hierarchies and polymorphisms
    8. Files structure and data streams
    9. Inner and nested classes
    10. Protecting class data fields
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook, current version of software, multimedia, internet and Web server account.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 12/19/2012


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  • CIT 245 - Data Structures and Programming: C++


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 130  

     
    Description
    A course in software design and development which focuses on data abstraction and implementation of information structures. The course introduces the object-oriented language C++. Topics include arrays, pointers, lists, stacks, queues and trees,


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Develop and present problem solutions using abstract data types.
    2. Compile, build and execute C++ programs.
    3. Implement, by using codes, code linked lists, stacks, queues and trees.
    4. Compare the efficiency of different algorithms.
    5. Implement various sorting and searching algorithms.
    Listed Topics
    1. C++ data types, identifiers, and operators
    2. C++ control structures
    3. Data abstraction
    4. Linked lists
    5. Stacks and queues
    6. Trees
    7. Sorting and searching algorithms
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate textbook; current and appropriate versions of software.
    Approved By: Flores, Roy Date Approved: 11/12/1998


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  • CIT 250 - Internetworking of Computers


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 120  

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the essential concepts and technical skills necessary to establish an Internet or Intranet within an enterprise, and the use of TCP/IP as a routable network protocol. Windows Server is used as a vehicle for both discussion and related lab activities. Topics include planning and installation, diverse client support, multiple protocol support, domain management, Novell and Macintosh connectivity, Remote Access Server, Active Directory Services and troubleshooting. Detailed coverage is also provided on TCP/IP issues such as IP addressing, bridging and routing, DHCP and naming services.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate the steps required to set up an Intranet or Internet within an enterprise.
    2. Demonstrate the steps required for the implementation of TCP/IP as a routable network protocol.
    3. Demonstrate the subnetting process.
    4. Plan and implement an enterprise network.
    5. Explain and list the concepts of IP addressing, DHCP, and bridging and routing.
    6. Explain how remote sites are connected utilizing VPN’s and RADIUS.
    7. Explain how to administer a multi-site, multi-domain environment.
    8. Describe how to integrate multiple platforms such as Microsoft, Novell and Unix, into an enterprise.
    9. Explain how security issues pertain to an enterprise.
    Listed Topics
    The following is intended to show specific topics to be covered and does not specify a required sequence.

    1. Communication architecture involved with WANS, switching, security
    2. Network applications used for internetworking
    3. Integrating networks using different operating systems (Novell and Unix)
    4. Integrating networks using different protocols and channel access methods
    5. Managing Active Directory Services across multiple LANs
    6. TCP/IP (DHCP, name resolution via WINS and DNS)
    7. Network monitoring, firewalls, proxy servers, system performance issues
    8. Troubleshooting problems and tools
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate textbook, class handouts and use of a Windows Server lab supporting multiple servers.
    Approved By: Flores, Roy Date Approved: 11/12/1998


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  • CIT 251 - Windows Server Operating System


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 120  

     
    Description
    This course presents lectures and hands-on labs involving Windows Server administration, as well as technical support knowledge and skills necessary to install, upgrade, and maintain a single LAN that uses Windows Server. Students learn and practice the following network administration concepts: planning for server hardware and network protocols, planning the Active Directory and Security, server installation, server configuration, configuring storage, backup options, managing accounts, managing printers, remote access and virtual private networks, managing Internet and network operability, server monitoring and optimization, network monitoring and troubleshooting.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    Upon completion of this course, the student will have both knowledge and hands-on experience of networking technical support as found in a Windows Server environment. The student will be capable of acting as an assistant to an administrator in a simple LAN configuration using Windows Server. The following outcomes are taken from Microsoft’s Preparation Guide for Exam 70-290 Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment.


       1.  Manage basic disks and dynamic disks
       2.  Monitor server hardware using Device Manager and Control Panel
       3.  Optimize server disk performance

    • Implement a RAID solution.
    • Defragment volumes and partitions.

       4.  Install and configure server hardware devices

    • Configure driver signing options.
    • Configure resource settings for a device.
    • Configure device properties and settings.

       5.  Manage local, roaming, and mandatory user profiles
       6.  Create and manage computer accounts in an Active Directory environment.
       7.  Create and manage groups:

    •  Identify and modify the scope of a group.
    •  Find domain groups in which a user is a member.
    •  Manage group membership.
    •  Create and modify groups by using the Active Directory Users and Computers Microsoft Management     Console (MMC) snap-in.

       8.  Create and manage user accounts

    •  Create and modify user accounts by using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in.

       9.  Troubleshoot computer accounts

    •   Diagnose and resolve issues related to computer accounts by using the Active Directory Users and    Computers MMC snap-in.
    •   Reset computer accounts.

      10.  Troubleshoot user accounts

    •   Diagnose and resolve account lockouts.
    •   Diagnose and resolve issues related to user account properties.

      11.  Configure access to shared folders

    •   Manage shared folder permissions.

      12.  Troubleshoot Terminal Services

    •   Diagnose and resolve issues related to Terminal Services security.
    •   Diagnose and resolve issues related to client access to Terminal Services.

      13.  Configure file system permissions.

    •   Verify effective permissions when granting permissions.
    •   Change ownership of files and folders.

      14.  Troubleshoot access to files and shared folders
      15.  Monitor and analyze events using Event Viewer and System Monitor
      16.  Manage servers remotely

    •   Manage a server by using Terminal Services remote administration mode.

      17.  Troubleshoot print queues
      18.  Monitor system performance
      19.  Monitor file and print servers using Task Manager, Event Viewer, and System Monitor

    •   Monitor disk quotas.
    •   Monitor print queues.
    •   Monitor server hardware for bottlenecks.

      20.  Monitor and optimize a server environment for application performance.

    •   Monitor memory, network, process, and disk performance objects.

      21.  Perform system recovery for a server.

    •   Back up files and System State data to media.
    •   Configure security for backup operations.

      22.  Manage backup procedures.

    •   Verify the successful completion of backup jobs.
    •   Manage backup storage media.

      23.  Restore backup data.
      24.  Schedule backup jobs.

     

     Listed Topics

    1. Managing and maintaining physical and logical devices
    2. Managing users, computers, and groups
    3. Managing and maintaining access to resources
    4. Managing and maintaining a server environment
    5. Managing and implementing disaster recovery
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate Microsoft Official Curriculum or Microsoft Approved Study Guide, class handouts and use of a Windows Server lab.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


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  • CIT 255 - Web Server Administration


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 120  

     
    Description
    This course provides technical information and hands-on lab activities involved with administering a Web Server on the Internet or an intranet. Topics include web server and proxy server overview, internet protocols and ISP connection options, HTTP and FTP protocols, web server planning and operating system platforms, server configuration and publishing documents, server-side programming, network security, web client/server security, CGI security and secure on-line transactions.


    Learning Outcomes
    Describe the functions of a Web server. Describe the role of secured Web servers. Describe the role of internal DNS and how to configure. Describe the differences between Microsoft and non-Microsoft Web server platforms. Explain and list the concepts of IP Addressing. Demonstrate the subnetting process. Explain the process of registering a domain name. Explain the functions of a proxy server. Identify the purpose of a DMZ. Explain how security issues pertain to the Web server environment. Identify the integration of E-mail services in a Web server environment.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 11/03/2009


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  • CIT 264 - Mobile Apps Programming Using Android


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 130   or with instructor’s permission

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to creating software applications (apps) using an Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) language and the Android operating system.  The focus of the course includes the Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and Software Development Kit (SDK) technologies, Graphical User Interfaces (GUI), program design and control structures, interactive activity classes and the activity life cycle, multimedia applications, database technology and Web application publishing.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Implement OOP language concepts and applications.
    2. Create apps using an OOP language and the Android operating system class libraries.
    3. Create a GUI to work with activities.
    4. Write apps to include classes, inheritance, constructors, methods and events.
    5. Write computer programming structures to control program logic execution.
    6. Implement activities, the activities life cycle, intents and fragments into apps.
    7. Create apps to include multimedia processing and database processing.
    8. Demonstrate the procedures required to deploy apps onto various devices or emulators.
    9. Prepare apps for Internet publication.
    Listed Topics
    1. OOP concepts and applications
    2. Android operating system architecture
    3. Software development tools, including the SDK, IDE and emulators
    4. Application processes in writing, compiling, executing, testing, and debugging apps on various devices/emulators  
    5. GUI
    6. Classes and inheritance
    7. Program design and programming structures
    8. Program activities and the life cycle of activities
    9. Multimedia processing
    10. Database technology
    11. Web application deployment and publishing
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/11/2019


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  • CIT 266 - Mobile Apps Programming using iOS


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 130   or with instructor’s permission.

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to creating software applications (apps) using an Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) language and the iOS operating system.  The focus of the course includes the Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and the Software Development Kit (SDK) technologies, visual software tools and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI), program design and control structures, the iOS app life cycle, multimedia, database technology and Web application publishing.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Implement OOP language concepts and applications.
    2. Create apps using an OOP language and the iOS operating system.
    3. Describe the architecture layers of the iOS operating system.
    4. Apply visual software tools to create GUI.
    5. Write apps to include classes, inheritance, constructors, methods and events.
    6. Apply delegates and protocols to promote efficiency of applications.
    7. Design apps to include multimedia processing and database technology.
    8. Demonstrate the procedures required to deploy apps onto various devices or simulators.
    9. Prepare apps for Internet publication.
    Listed Topics
    1. OOP concepts and applications
    2. iOS operating system architecture
    3. Software development tools
    4. Application processes in writing, compiling, executing, testing, and debugging apps on various devices/simulators
    5. GUI
    6. Classes and inheritance
    7. Program design and programming structures
    8. iOS app life cycle
    9. Multimedia processing
    10. Database technology
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 04/01/2019


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  • CIT 280 - Computer Forensics 2


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 180  and CIT 181  
    Co-requisites: CIT 281  

    Description
    This course provides students the opportunities to apply the fundamentals of the computer forensics to the processing and analysis of real or hypothetical cases. Students obtain substantial hands-on experience in problem-solving and in using computer forensic knowledge and tools to identify, recover, collect, process, analyze, document and present digital evidence in sample cases of computer crimes or incidents. The hands-on experience includes work on file and data recovery in addition to examination and analysis of email and network intrusions.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify legal and business implications of sample cases of computer investigations.
    2. Prepare a plan for public or private investigation of a sample case.
    3. Determine appropriate data acquisition method.
    4. Preserve the integrity of data needed using appropriate forensic tools.
    5. Perform digital forensic analysis on Microsoft file systems.
    6. Solve problems of data-hiding and data access.
    7. Perform network data capture and analysis.
    8. Examine email messages and headers.
    9. Analyze email messages and headers.
    10. Document findings of digital evidence per business and legal procedures.
    11. Present findings of digital evidence per business and legal procedures.
    Listed Topics
    1. Review of major laws and regulations regarding information security
    2. Public investigation versus private or corporate investigation
    3. Sample cases of public and private investigation
    4. Features of various computer forensic tools and data recovery procedures
    5. Network sniffing and monitoring tools
    6. Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) software tools for Windows
    7. Email configurations and data analysis
    8. Legal documentation of digital evidence
    9. Expert witnesses for computer investigations
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate textbook, current and appropriate version(s) of software, multimedia, Internet access and a CCAC web server account for web publishing.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2014


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  • CIT 281 - Project in Computer Forensics


    Credits: 2
    2 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 180  and CIT 181  
    Co-requisites: CIT 280  

    Description
    This course is an advanced level practicum for students in the Computer Forensics program. Students gain comprehensive experience and demonstrates their competencies in applying the knowledge and skills learned in this program to real world or hypothetical cases of computer security crime or incident. While students are encouraged to identify and work on projects in actual government agencies or business organizations, they may also work on equivalent hypothetical cases mutually agreed to between the students and the instructor. The course work culminates into an individual or team portfolio that can be used to evaluate the students’ competencies in the program.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe the scope of the case assignment and identify the legal grounds or business rules and constituents related to the case.
    2. Plan a solution to a computer forensics case to include determining facilities, technology, tools and required personnel by applying the required critical thinking and problem solving skills in the investigation.
    3. Defend the planned solution with supervisor or instructor or team members.
    4. Observe legal procedures and professional ethics throughout a case.
    5. Develop a professional portfolio based on the assigned project which demonstrates all computer forensic software used in the solution of the case.
    Listed Topics
    1. Case assignment and evaluation criteria
    2. Review of governing laws and business regulations regarding the case
    3. Review of digital forensic techniques, tools and procedures
    4. Regular progress report to supervisor or instructor
    5. Project management skills
    6. Documentation and portfolio development
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate textbook, current and appropriate version(s) of software, multimedia, Internet access and a CCAC web server account for web publishing.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/15/2014


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  • CIT 282 - Advanced Cybersecurity Topics


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 185  

     
    Description
    This course covers advanced and emerging topics in Cybersecurity. The current emphasis in the course is on mobile device security and cloud security.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe mobile device architectures and files systems.
    2. Describe security vulnerabilities in mobile phones and tablets.
    3. Describe security threats and attacks against mobile devices.
    4. Evaluate different mobile device security models.
    5. Identify mobile device system and data analysis tools.
    6. Perform mobile device system and data analysis.
    7. Describe solutions to mitigate lost mobile devices.
    8. Evaluate security limitations of the virtualization technology.
    9. Describe security vulnerabilities in cloud computing.
    10. Evaluate security policies, agreements and safeguards in cloud environments.
    Listed Topics
    1. Mobile device architectures and files systems
    2. Security vulnerabilities in mobile phones and tablets
    3. Security threats and attacks against mobile devices
    4. Mobile device security models
    5. Mobile device system and data analysis tools
    6. Hands-on work on mobile device system and data analysis
    7. Mitigations of lost mobile devices
    8. Security limitations of virtualization
    9. Security vulnerabilities in cloud computing
    10. Security policies, agreements and safeguards in cloud environments
    Reference Materials
    Appropriate materials, references, and software tools will be used.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/04/2014


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  • CIT 285 - Cybersecurity Capstone


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Instructor approval

     
    Description
    This course, which must be taken in the final semester, is the exit course for the program. With the instructor’s guidance and approval, each student will work on and complete a portfolio-type project on a specific cybersecurity problem using the learning from previous courses in the program and additional research.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Evaluate cybersecurity vulnerabilities, threats and attacks.
    2. Perform risk analysis and assessment for cybersecurity incidents.
    3. Create cybersecurity policies and procedures.
    4. Select effective security solutions for intrusion detection and prevention.
    5. Handle cybersecurity incidents appropriately.
    6. Identify safeguards and controls to mitigate cybersecurity risks.
    7. Create technical reports on cybersecurity incidents.
    8. Conduct basic research in the Cybersecurity field.
    9. Demonstrate familiarity with cybersecurity career paths and requirements.
    10. Demonstrate basic skills in managing cybersecurity projects.
    Listed Topics
    1. Evaluation of cybersecurity vulnerabilities, threats and attacks
    2. Risk analysis and assessment for cybersecurity incidents
    3. Cybersecurity policies and procedures
    4. Decisions on security solutions for intrusion detection and prevention
    5. Cybersecurity incident handling
    6. Mitigations of cybersecurity risks
    7. Technical reports on cybersecurity incidents
    8. Research skills and resources in the Cybersecurity field
    9. Cybersecurity career paths and requirements
    10. Cybersecurity project management skills
    Reference Materials
    Appropriate materials, references, and software tools will be used.
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 11/04/2014


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  • CIT 403 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 3
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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  • CIT 406 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: 6
    Description
    Cooperative Education provides students with a working experience in their discipline and develops their ability to understand and perform appropriately in the dynamic work environment.  Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to earn three credits and a minimum of 300 hours to earn six credits.  In order to participate and enroll in Cooperative Education, students must meet the following criteria:

    •     Must have a QPA of 2.5 or higher
    •     Completed 30 college credits with at least 12 credits in their major field
    •     Have faculty approval
    •     Secure clearances if they are needed
    •     Follow established processes and complete required paperwork
    •     Qualify for risk management coverage

    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 05/14/2007


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  • CIT 600 - Windows Operating System


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course is designed for end users who are familiar with computers and who need to use the features and functionality of the Windows operating system for personal or professional reasons. Topics include customizing the environment, managing file systems, performing file and folder operations, enhancing computer security and evaluating installation issues. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the names and functions of the Windows operating system.
    2. Demonstrate the resizing, moving, scrolling, maximizing, minimizing, restoring and closing of windows.
    3. Manage files and folders.
    4. Customize Windows environment including desktop, screen display, printer, mouse and keyboard usage.
    5. Demonstrate proper use of Windows and other desktop applications.
    6. Access the Internet with a browser.
    7. Apply Windows security features.
    Listed Topics
    1. Introduction to Windows interface
    2. Program and file management
    3. Windows customization
    4. Windows applications
    5. Internet searches with browser
    6. Management of Windows devices and installation issues
    7. Windows security
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


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  • CIT 601 - Research using the Internet


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system.

     
    Description
    This course introduces students to the Internet as an information retrieval tool and teaches strategies for locating and analyzing information. The course is designed to help students develop the basic information literacy skills necessary for college course work, general research and for lifelong learning in an information-centered society. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the types of information resources available via the Internet.
    2. Use effective search strategies of appropriate Internet resources and Internet-accessible library databases in the research process.
    3. Apply keyword and Boolean search techniques for Internet search tools.
    4. Access relevant information resources using Internet communication tools including web search engines, meta-search engines and subject directories.
    5. Evaluate the credibility, quality and accuracy of Internet resources for specific information needs.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of social, legal and ethical issues including netiquette, plagiarism and copyright infringement.
    7. Demonstrate proper use of Blackboard features utilized in most on-line CCAC classes including discussion boards and assignment submissions.
    Listed Topics
    1. Blackboard features
    2. Brief history of Internet
    3. Internet communication and research tools
    4. Strategies for effective and efficient use of web search engines
    5. Keyword and Boolean search techniques
    6. Social, legal and ethical issues
    7. Evaluation of Internet resources for usefulness and reliability
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    • Information Literacy
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


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  • CIT 602 - Presentation Graphics: Powerpoint


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system and some basic exposure to Microsoft Office.

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the use of presentation graphics software using presentation software such as Microsoft PowerPoint.  Topics include planning, creating, formatting, customizing and reviewing professional presentations.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the names and functions of the presentation interface.
    2. Demonstrate the creation and editing of presentations.
    3. Format presentations with fonts, SmartArt graphics, shapes, headers/footers and notes.
    4. Insert pictures, textboxes, charts, tables and WordArt into presentations.
    5. Customize presentations with themes, backgrounds, transitions, timings, sound and animation.
    6. Make universal changes to presentations using master slides.
    7. Apply design principles in the planning and development of professional presentations.
    Listed Topics
    1. Professional presentation design
    2. Presentation creation
    3. Presentation formatting with fonts, SmartArt graphics, shapes, headers/footers and notes
    4. Pictures, textboxes, charts, tables and WordArt
    5. Presentation customization
    6. Master slides
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 604 - Electronic Spreadsheets: Excel


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system and some basic exposure to Microsoft Office.

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to solving business and technical problems using Microsoft Excel.  Topics include basic spreadsheet concepts involving design, formulas, functions and charts.  This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the names and functions of the spreadsheet interface.
    2. Describe the theory and concepts of electronic spreadsheets and their role in decision making.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to design a worksheet, select cells, enter text and numbers and navigate using spreadsheet application.
    4. Format a worksheet by adjusting column widths, inserting rows and columns, aligning text and adding borders/colors/shading.
    5. Create formulas using relative and absolute references and functions.
    6. Design charts from spreadsheet data.
    7. Modify attributes of charts.
    Listed Topics
    1. Spreadsheet creation with text/numbers
    2. Formulas, functions and relative vs absolute cell references
    3. Spreadsheet formats
    4. Visual presentation of data through charts
    5. Role of spreadsheets in decision making
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 606 - Database Management: Access


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system and some basic exposure to Microsoft Office.

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to Microsoft Access. Topics include basic database concepts, creating a simple database, navigation, sorting and searching, creating forms, queries, reports and labels. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Design a relational database using tables, fields, field properties, primary keys, foreign keys and relationships.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to navigate, sort, filter and add/edit/delete records.
    3. Construct queries using fields in one or more tables.
    4. Build queries for navigating, sorting, filtering and adding/editing/deleting field data.
    5. Construct forms for users to enter record data.
    6. Demonstrate the proper use of forms to navigate, sort, filter and add/edit/delete field data.
    7. Produce formatted reports and labels through the sorting and filtering of field data.
    Listed Topics
    1. Database structure definition and creation
    2. Data entry and editing
    3. Searching, sorting and filtering data
    4. Form design and use
    5. Report and label design
    6. Query construction
    7. Print options for tables, forms, reports and queries
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 607 - Office Management:Outlook


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and Windows operating system and some basic exposure to Microsoft Office.

     
    Description
    This course focuses on developing Microsoft Outlook skills necessary to send e-mail, keep a calendar, store notes, organize tasks and keep track of contracts in a small office or home environment. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify the names and functions of the Outlook interface.
    2. Demonstrate the use of basic mailbox functions.
    3. Configure different email accounts.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to attach files and insert pictures into emails.
    5. Organize messages using flags, categories and folders.
    6. Apply personal signatures to messages.
    7. Manage contacts, address book and tasks.  
    8. Create appointments and meetings in calendar.

     Listed Topics

    1. Mailbox functions
    2. Email enhancements
    3. Contact management
    4. Calendar management
    5. Task management
    6. Customization
    Reference Materials
    Textbooks/materials, current and appropriate software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration as required by instructor; access to the Internet.
    Students who successfully complete this course acquire general knowledge, skills and abilities that align with CCAC’s definition of an educated person. Specifically, this course fulfills these General Education Goals:
    • Technological Competence
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 03/15/2019


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 615 - Computer Applications in Health Care


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Basic skills using a personal computer and operating system and some basic exposure to Microsoft Office.

     
    Description
    This course provides an overview of actual and potential uses within the health care system. Emphasis is on learning about computer applications and their uses specific to nursing/allied health care. A hands-on component is included as part of the course. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Describe computer operations using proper terminology.
    2. Identify the use of computers for information management specific to health care.
    3. Demonstrate word processing applications in health care.
    4. Identify applications of spreadsheet analysis and database usage related to health care.
    5. Define and use computer assisted instruction software packages.
    6. Identify hospital information systems and their impact on the health care system.
    7. Identify the effects of the computer on the role of the health care team, the quality of health care and health care costs.
    8. Identify clients’ rights to confidentiality in computer information systems.
    Listed Topics
    1. Use of the Internet for health information
    2. Emergence of computers into health care industry
    3. Sources of resistance to computers
    4. HIS (Hospital Information Systems)
    5. Privacy issues
    6. Ergonomics
    7. Databases & spreadsheets related to practice, education, & research
    8. Computer-Assisted Instruction experience
    9. Hands-on experience with word processing, databases and spreadsheets
    Reference Materials
    The course will use a current and appropriate textbook or handouts, current and appropriate software and the use of a computer lab with access to the Internet.
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 11/03/2009


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 641 - Computer Information Security


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: Regular experience using computers and Internet.

     
    Description
    This course is an introduction to practical computer and data security topics for all users, including business professionals and home users. Coverage includes general information security concepts, personal computer security, internet and e-mail security, wired and wireless network security, and organizational data security and risk assessment, The course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.


    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Define and describe general information security issues, including data and identity theft and various vulnerabilities and attacks.
    2. Discuss information security policies and principles.
    3. Explain how to apply physical security, data security and operating system security on personal desktop and laptop computers.
    4. Identify and describe risks and vulnerabilities of the Internet and e-mail.
    5. Identify and explain preventive measures and technologies that can be used to minimize Web attacks and protect e-mail.
    6. List and describe common network attacks and security solutions.
    7. Discuss effective practices in organizational data asset evaluation and risk assessment.
    Listed Topics
    The following is intended to show specific topics to be covered and does not specify a required sequence.

    1. Definition of information security and general security policy
    2. Data and identity theft, various vulnerabilities and attacks, and attacker profiles
    3. Physical security, data security, and operating system security of personal computers
    4. Internet and Web vulnerabilities, attacks, and security measures and solutions
    5. Email vulnerabilities, attacks, and security measures and solutions
    6. Wired and wireless network security issues and solutions
    7. Organizational data security and risk assessment
    Reference Materials
    Current and appropriate textbook, current and appropriate version of software, multimedia for lecture and demonstration, access to the Internet.
    Approved By: Sutin, Stewart Date Approved: 11/08/2006


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CIT 655 - Swift Programming for Software Developers, Experimental


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CIT 111   or previous experience with an object-oriented programming language
    Description
    This course is an introduction to the Apple Swift object-oriented computer programming language. The focus of the course includes the Integrated Development Environment (IDE), along with various software development tools, to create computer programs written in Swift. Additional course topics include program variables and data types, conditional and control programming structures, foundation frameworks, object-oriented computer programming concepts and applications, and collections. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Apply a Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and various software development tools to create Swift computer programs.
    2. Write programs to work with various data types, including, Float, Double and Bool.
    3. Write programs to include various conditional statements.
    4. Create programs to include various program control structures.
    5. Create programs to implement object-oriented programming techniques.
    6. Create programs to work with various collections.
    Listed Topics
    1. The IDE and software development tools
    2. Data types, string interpolation, type inference and type annotation
    3. Conditional statements
    4. Program control structures
    5. Foundation frameworks and the Swift standard library
    6. Object-oriented computer programming concepts and applications
    7. Collections
    Reference Materials
    Current textbook, references, current version of software, multimedia and Internet.


    Course and Section Search



Court Reporting

  
  • CRT 100 - Court Reporting Orientation


    Credits: 1
    1 Lecture Hours

    Description
    This course introduces students to the profession of court reporting. Topics include the history of court reporting, educational requirements, the duties and responsibilities of court reporters, professional organizations, certifications testing and career options in the fields of Judicial, Freelance, Closed Captioning and Computer Aided Realtime Translation (CART). Speakers include practicing court reporters from local firms and courts. A field trip to a closed captioning agency is offered. This course is open to any student with an interest in the court reporting profession.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Discuss the history of court reporting.
    2. Identify the four career paths of a court reporter: Judicial, Freelance, Closed Captioning and CART.
    3. List the professional organizations associated with the field of court reporting.
    4. Discuss the ethical responsibilities associated with the job of a court reporter.
    5. State the skill requirements of court reporters for employment and certification.
    6. Identify the skills necessary to work in the field of closed captioning.
    Listed Topics
    1. Historical development of court reporting and importance in today’s legal environment
    2. Professional duties and responsibilities of court reporters
    3. Skill requirements for national certification of court reporters
    4. Employment opportunities locally and nationally
    Reference Materials
    Handouts, Journal of Court Reporting, The Outline, Internet and library resources
    CDs depicting aspects of the field of court reporting
    Field trips and guest speakers
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 101 - Court Reporting 1


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: CRT 103  

    Description
    This course introduces the student to the theory of writing conflict-free machine shorthand outlines. The student will develop the ability to write words, sentences and paragraphs through daily dictation and drills. The student will demonstrate the ability to write Literary material in realtime at 60-80 words per minute.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform machine shorthand writing techniques on the Stenograph machine.
    2. Apply theory principles of writing on the Stenograph machine, consonant combinations, long vowels and diphthongs, suffixes, numbers and abbreviations.
    3. Write in realtime through use of court reporting software.
    4. Read aloud from Stenographically produced notes and analyze stroking errors.
    5. Edit transcripts using computer-generated software.
    6. Write on a Stenograph machine dictated material at 95 percent accuracy using theory, grammar, proofreading and editing techniques.
    7. Write, edit and transcribe Literary material in realtime at 60-80 words per minute for three-five minutes with 95 percent accuracy in a supervised environment.
    Listed Topics
    1. Keyboard practice and rhythmic stroking
    2. Machine shorthand theory principles and techniques
    3. Speed development
    4. Oral reading of sentences and Literary material from machine shorthand notes
    5. Transcription of sentences and Literary material from machine shorthand notes
    6. Literary speed proficiency of 60 to 80 words per minute for 3 minutes with 95 percent transcription accuracy
    Reference Materials
    Materials and Resources:
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: CDs used in concert with theory lessons, CD player
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 102 - Court Reporting 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 101  
    Co-requisites: CRT 104  and CRT 205  

    Description
    This course is a continuation of the conflict-free theory for writing machine shorthand. The student will demonstrate skill building through dictation, readback of notes, machine practice and transcription. Instruction is placed on writing terminology that requires multi-strokes and developing skill in writing every word of the English language.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Recognize machine shorthand theory principles and apply them to the spoken word.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to Stenographically write any word spoken or written in the English language with speed and accuracy.
    3. Translate orally and read machine shorthand notes in English.
    Listed Topics
    1. Machine shorthand theory and Question and Answer material
    2. Advanced oral translation and reading of machine shorthand notes in English
    3. All English language words written in machine shorthand
    Reference Materials
    Materials and Resources:
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: CDs used in concert with theory lessons, CD player
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 103 - Machine Shorthand Theory


    Credits: 4
    4 Lecture Hours

    Co-requisites: CRT 101  

    Description
    This course introduces the student to the theory of writing conflict-free machine shorthand outlines. The alphabet, briefs and phrases and fingering exercises will be taught. The student will develop the ability to write words, sentences and paragraphs on the Stenograph machine through daily dictation and drills.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Perform machine shorthand writing techniques on the Stenograph machine.
    2. Apply theory principles of writing on the Stenograph machine consonant combinations, long vowels and diphthongs, suffixes, numbers, abbreviations.
    3. Write in realtime through use of court reporting software.
    4. Read aloud from Stenographically produced notes and analyze stroking errors.
    5. Edit transcripts using computer-generated software.
    6. Write dictated material at 95 percent accuracy using theory, grammar, proofreading and editing techniques.
    Listed Topics
    1. Finger dexterity and Stenograph keyboard knowledge through the use of Case CATalyst realtime software
    2. Theory principles, abbreviations, briefs and phrases
    3. Machine shorthand principles, writing the spoken and written word
    4. Oral reading and analyzing of machine shorthand notes
    Reference Materials
    Materials and Resources:
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: CDs used in concert with theory lessons, CD player
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 104 - Speedbuilding


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 101  
    Co-requisites: CRT 102  and CRT 205  

    Description
    This course uses dictation and practice of Literary and Question and Answer material. The goal is 90-110 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy at 95 percent or better. Dictation and transcription skills are emphasized and tested.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Literary and Question and Answer material at 90-110 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the term.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 90-110 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Write multi-syllable and unfamiliar words with speed and accuracy including medical and technical dictation.
    5. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Oral translation and reading of machine shorthand notes
    2. Literary and Question and Answer writing in machine shorthand
    3. Jury Charge briefs and phrases
    4. Endurance writing
    5. Speed and accuracy writing
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: CDs used in concert with theory lessons, CD player
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 106 - Question and Answer 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 102  CRT 104  
    Co-requisites: CRT 107  and CRT 108  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Question and Answer material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in testimony are reviewed. Colloquy designations are stressed in multi-voice material. The goal is writing 120-140 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Question and Answer material at 120-140 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 120-140 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Write multi-syllable and unfamiliar words with speed and accuracy including medical and technical dictation.
    5. Take dictation of multi-voice material utilizing machine shorthand speaker designations at 120-140 words per minute with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    6. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice three hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 107 - Jury Charge 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 102 , CRT 104  
    Co-requisites: CRT 106  and CRT 108  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Jury Charge material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in Jury Charge are reviewed. The goal is writing 120-140 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Jury Charge material at 120-140 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 120-140 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice three hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 108 - Literary 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 102 , CRT 104  
    Co-requisites: CRT 106  and CRT 107  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development of Literary material. Oral note reading is also stressed. The goal is writing 100-120 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Literary material at 100-120 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 100-120 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice three hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 111 - Court Transcription 1


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 101 , CRT 103  
    Co-requisites: CRT 102  

    Description
    This course offers an introduction to court reporting transcript production, including matters of English grammar, usage and punctuation in combination with formatting of text to accurately reflect the verbatim, spoken word in text documents. Reinforcement and development of language skills and transcript-related computer skills using CATalyst software are emphasized.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Use proofreading and editing skills to correctly punctuate and format text.
    2. Demonstrate proficiently in English grammar, usage and punctuation.
    3. Perform proficiently in research of transcript topics.
    4. Develop skill in the use of Case CATalyst software and produce corrected, accurate transcripts.
    5. Recognize basic transcript components and produce accurate transcripts that incorporate basic transcription skills.
    Listed Topics
    1. English grammar, punctuation and usage
    2. Proofreader’s symbols
    3. Spelling and research
    4. Proofreading, editing and correction of text for accuracy
    5. Software training
    Reference Materials
    A textbook will be required
    Audio-visual Materials: Course material available at class Blackboard site on http://courses.ccac.edu/ and supplemental material on the internet
    Open Lab, Tutoring, etc.: Library 311A Practice Lab
    Approved By: Bullock, Quintin Date Approved: 05/11/2015


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 205 - Machine Shorthand Companion


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 101  and CRT 103  
    Co-requisites: CRT 102  and CRT 104  

    Description
    This course is offered in conjunction with CRT 102 . In this course students are drilled on machine shorthand theory. Emphasis is placed on developing skill and proficiency in the mastery of the complete theory of machine shorthand writing. The course focuses on the development of accurate writing skills and understanding of theory principals. Dictation and drill are conducted daily.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate accuracy at a level of 95 percent in a testing and classroom environment in Question and Answer and Literary material.
    2. Write numbers, symbols and acronyms at an accuracy level of 95 percent in a testing and classroom environment.
    3. Stroke theory and Jury Charge briefs and phrases at an accuracy level of 95 percent.
    4. Memorize and write 50 Jury Charge briefs and phrases at an accuracy level of 95 percent.
    Listed Topics
    1. Steno alphabet, punctuation, numbers, inflected endings
    2. Theory of phonetic writing
    3. Computer aided transcription skills
    4. Evaluation of writing techniques
    5. Individual writing styles
    Reference Materials
    Materials and Resources:
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: CDs used in concert with theory lessons, CD player
    Directed Study: Practice three hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Tutoring Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 206 - Question and Answer 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 106  
    Co-requisites: CRT 207  and CRT 208  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Question and Answer material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in testimony are reviewed. Colloquy designations are stressed in multi-voice material. The goal is writing 150-160 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Question and Answer material at 150-160 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 150-160 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Write multi-syllable and unfamiliar words with speed and accuracy including medical and technical dictation.
    5. Take dictation of multi-voice material utilizing machine shorthand speaker designations at 150-160 words per minute with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    6. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice three hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 207 - Jury Charge 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 107  
    Co-requisites: CRT 206  and CRT 208  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development and readback of Jury Charge material. Appropriate abbreviations and phrases used in Jury Charge are reviewed. The goal is writing 140-160 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Jury Charge material at 140-160 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 140-160 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


  
  • CRT 208 - Literary 2


    Credits: 3
    3 Lecture Hours

    Prerequisites: CRT 108  
    Co-requisites: CRT 206  and CRT 207  

    Description
    This course emphasizes speed development of Literary material. Oral note reading is also stressed. The goal is writing 120-140 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or better using Case CATalyst software.
    Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    1. Identify and analyze stroking errors and fluently read aloud machine shorthand notes.
    2. Write dictation of Literary material at 120-140 words per minute using machine shorthand skills and transcribe under institutional supervision with the goal of 95 percent accuracy or higher by the end of the course.
    3. Write with speed and accuracy through sustained dictation periods at 120-140 words per minute for five minutes with transcription accuracy of 95 percent or higher.
    4. Use correct grammar and punctuation when transcribing.
    Listed Topics
    1. Internet research on vocabulary, spelling and word meanings within the context of dictated material
    2. Sustained classroom practice and readback in an environment that facilitates speed development
    3. Stenograph University Online/Accelerators
    Reference Materials
    Required Text: Department selected text
    Stenograph University Online Pass Code with Performance eValuator
    Required Materials: Stenograph paper, ribbons, realtime cables and connections
    Audio-Visual Materials: Stenograph Testimony, Jury Charge and Captioning Accelerators
    Available in Reserve Room of the library and on the Internet
    Directed Study: Practice thee hours daily utilizing CDs, tutorials and online dictation materials
    Open Court Reporting Lab
    Approved By: Johnson, Alex Date Approved: 05/05/2011


    Course and Section Search


 

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